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Re: Native American Iron Smelting Artifacts-email reply from Wm Connor, MES

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  • Susan
    All, In regard to the Native American smelted artifacts link I posted two days ago: http://www.archaeologyfieldwork.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=135
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 31, 2008
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      All,

      In regard to the Native American smelted artifacts link I posted two days ago: http://www.archaeologyfieldwork.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=135 , I received this email from William Connor of Midwestern Epigraphic Society in Ohio.  I am inserting his MES home page link of several years ago, and see a photo of Zena in there!  Bottom of the site is the link again to Connor's "America's Myserious Furnaces". http://www.iwaynet.net/~wdc/meshome.htm

      Date:Wed, 29 Oct 2008 6:53 pm

      Sue:

      I've seen this site before and have no idea how this could have been an iron furnace.  Primarily, this is because in a direction reduction iron furnace (the old original kind), the ore and charcoal must be in the same container.  In my Ohio pit furnace type, burning charcoal chemically reduces the ore (removes oxygen from the iron oxide ore) and what is left of the ore becomes semi-molten and forms a "bloom" of wrought iron.  Also, it seems that if this really was an iron furnace, it would produce only tiny amounts of iron.
       
      So I'm not sure what was going on at this site. 
       
      Bill Conner
       
      --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Susan" <beldingenglish@...> wrote:

      Vince, David, and All,
       
      I address this post also to fairly new member from Minnesota, David
      Johnson and his father who continue to maintain their outstanding web
      site(s). It is my hope David will keep us updated re: his site and
      further investigations, especially those along or near significant
      waterway sites.
       
      I suggest that one smelted metal implement on the web site might have
      come from Spiro Mounds, which I overheard during one of perhaps a dozen
      tours of the senior Dr. Johnson's basement Copper Room and museum in C.
      Wisconsin:
       
      The Old Copper Complex-North America's First Metal Miners and Metal
      Artisians:  http://copperculture.homestead.com/
       
      Since Vince brought up Spiro Mounds and the surrounding region, thought
      some of you might be interested in the archaeologyfieldwork.com general
      website, and this article by Charlie Hatchett of Texas:
      http://www.archaeologyfieldwork.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=135
       
      I sent the article to Dr. Wm. Connor of the Midwestern Epigraphic
      Society. See "America's Mysterious Furnaces":
      http://www.iwaynet.net/~wdc/  
      You may recall I posted Judy Rudebusch's article on mooring stones to
      this group not long ago, will send this to her in lieu of triangular
      stone holes in one of Hatchett's photos---here called a vent. But I
      suggest they could have been made by the same type of tools, time
      frame, and peoples that created countless "mooring stone holes" being
      investigated by Dahm, Rudebusch, Hilgren, etc. along intracontinental N.
      American waterways. We, after all are open-minded scientifically-minded
      investigators with additional added data to consider on issues that
      should not have been concluded and closed.
       
      Charlie also has a forum and blog on pre-clovis artifacts in Texas end
      of his letter. His article from Archaeologyfieldwork.com web site:
      Native American Iron Smelting Artifacts
      <http://www.archaeologyfieldwork.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=135&start=0&\
      postdays=0&postorder=asc&highlight=&sid=8dee6e5857f36f876ec97f0912de1665\
       
      http://www.archaeologyfieldwork.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=135

      Susan
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