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indigenous institutions and book of wild

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  • Vincent Barrows
    This document was published by the French Government and is composed of fragments of ancient Indigenous compositions, drama or rhetoric, adapted since the
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 25, 2008
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      This document was published by the French Government and is composed of fragments of ancient Indigenous compositions, drama or rhetoric, adapted since the conquest including Subject of Christians.  The author wrote it is urgent to collect these oratories, which are becoming daily more unintelligible and quickly lost amid political concussions incessant. Such documents embrace the whole history of periods cosmogonic, Toltec history, until the arrival of Cortez.  Geography and ethnography of the area between the Mississippi and Grand Ocean, are represented in the book at hand.
      It includes representations purely artistic, annals, calendars, rituals, parts of the trial, land registration, and finally the
      mixed signs of writing and numeration.
      Using the help of writing and plans drawing, as on our maps, our plans including some prints with captions, where the legend and localities are accompanied by their own name and sometimes a narrative. This leads all to the absolute conclusion on the degree of perfection achieved through writing which could only be taught in indigenous institutions.

      The Book of Wild (Manuscript Pictographique Amerique), recorded by D. Emanuel 1860 is one such remaining document from these institutions.

      Scanned this document from Microfilm at Rice University in Houston, TX. It was recorded by Domenech Emanuel (1825-1903). This 1860 document is called The Manuscript Pictographique Amerique. (Book of Wild). D. Emanuel started out as a French Missionary where he stayed in St. Louis at the Seminary of the Barrens. I think he may have acquired the document when he was at that seminary, The origin of the document with American Indian Pictographs probably has much earlier origin,.of particular interest are the written languages on the document and the depictions of swords and scabbards, as well as sailing ships. I do not know what it is or what it says. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. I did some research to find out who D. Emmanuel was. and found that he was one of the first ordained missionaries in texas, and spent a lot of time as an amateur ethnographer. He made trips to the Western states and recorded many interesting examples of petroglyphs in several later works. Imp.Lemercier Paris, this ideographic of the "Red Indians" was indeed controversial. The author wrote some responses to this document were "full of hatred of a national jealousy".An translation from the frech document stated: "We should not expect to find in a library a important manuscript  written by the Sachem hand of some insider secrets of all institutions of this tribe.
       That is what happened. The Library of the Arsenal has, for nearly a century, hidden in a box that contained the volume manuscript, and bears in the catalog title  Book of Wild. This volume, indeed, was by penned by the Indians of New France. The Marquis de Paulmy, who had in his valuable library, received, probably from some travelers or that were donated by missionaries. We were unable, however, discover a certain provenance of the Book of the Wild. It is a collection of figures and hieroglyphics intermingled of letters and numbers very crudely and very naively designed to lead and rolled in red crayon on thick paper mill in Canada. The collection is incomplete at the beginning and end, also offers regrettable shortcomings in the current volume. It consists still lift sheets of a small size of 4" or more less affected by the seawater, which has made them stick together.
      This manuscript we had reported as a monument very curious and perhaps unique in the world, by famous bibliophile Paul Lacroix, curator of the Library of the Arsenal made us take a facsimile, with the intention to recommend to Mexican archaeologists.  A missionary scholar who returning from the United States, where he stayed long among Indian tribes, may have provided us this precious manuscript. Also, it is with feelings of deep gratitude we thank the government of His Majesty Emperor Napoleon III of its readiness to meet and our plea to all charges of this publication and he was executed in the seventeenth century. We have not ever published a manuscript apparently rarer and more singular than this: it is undoubtedly from the old people of New France . We do not claim to provide translation, not would be hardly possible, with the weak information, it has on the pictographic redskins: however, we think we can explain not only the about this manuscript, but still a large number of hieroglyphics it contains.  But before you start this explanation we give some preliminary details on on the Indian ideographic."

      This correspondence is to share this document with you - called the Book of Wild, which can be seen at the following links:

      http://s243.photobucket.com/albums/ff280/Marburg72/Book%20of%20Wild/

      http://www.freewebs.com/historyofmonksmound/bookofwild.htm

      http://amicus.collectionscanada.gc.ca/aaweb-bin/aamain/itemdisp?sessionKey=999999999_142&l=0&d=2&v=0&lvl=1&itm=5735499

      Vince Barrows

    • Vincent Barrows
      The attached  photo is from a Spiro Mound display at the Houston, Texas Natural History Museum. The photo shows three (3) points uncovered in Sprio Mound.
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 27, 2008
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        The attached  photo is from a Spiro Mound display at the Houston, Texas Natural History Museum. The photo shows three (3) points uncovered in Sprio Mound. These points appear to be Brewerton (Late Archaic) points.
         
        So the question is: what are they doing in a "Mississippian" mound?
         
        Is there any reason to believe that Spiro Mound was not from the same time as these points?
         
        I suggest that the chronology is parallel with the lithics found within the mound - making it "late archaic" rather than "Mississippian".

        My two cents;
        Vince

      • Vince
        Here is a link to the translated version (from French) of the Book of Wild, with D. Emanuels complete commentary on each page.
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 28, 2008
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          Here is a link to the translated version (from French) of the Book of
          Wild, with D. Emanuels complete commentary on each page.

          http://www.scribd.com/doc/9568355/Pictograph-America-Book-of-Wild
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