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native american genocide

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  • Vincent Barrows
    http://www2.tbo.com/content/2008/may/01/na-american-indian-deaths-called-genocide/?news-nationworld American Indian Deaths Called Genocide The Associated Press
    Message 1 of 3 , May 7, 2008
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      http://www2.tbo.com/content/2008/may/01/na-american-indian-deaths-called-genocide/?news-nationworld
       
       
      American Indian Deaths Called Genocide
      The Associated Press
      May 1, 2008
      DENVER - The Colorado Legislature passed a resolution Wednesday comparing
      the deaths of millions of American Indians to the Holocaust and other acts
      of genocide around the world.
      The nonbinding measure passed 22-12 in the Senate and 59-4 in the House
      after some lawmakers protested that it unfairly condemned all Europeans
      for injustices against Indians.
      The resolution says Europeans intentionally caused many American Indian
      deaths and that early American settlers often treated Indians with
      "cruelty and inhumanity."
      It specifically mentions the forced removal of the Cherokee Nation in
      1838 and the 1864 Sand Creek massacre in Colorado. It also refers to
      deaths due to disease that were intensified by forced migrations, food
      deprivation and enslavement by Europeans.
      Members of a group of American Indians who came to the Capitol to watch
      the vote said they wanted recognition of what happened to their ancestors.
      "It's nothing personal to the people of today, but we have to recognize
      the past," said Theresa Gutierrez, who works with American Indian students
      at the University of Colorado in Denver.
      Copyright c. 2008 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.
      Tampa Bay Online Copyright c. 2008 Media General Communications
      Holdings, LLC. A Media General company.
       
       
      --------- "RE: Indian Genocide Resolution stirs debate" ---------
       
       
      Date: Fri, 2 May 2008 07:31:13 -0700
      From: Gary Smith <gars@...>
      Subj: NA News Item
      - - - - - - -<Forwarded news>- - - - - - -
      filename="SOME NOT HAPPY WITH ADMITTING TRUTH"
       
       
      http://www.pechanga.net/
      http://durangoherald.com/asp-bin/article_generation.asp?article_type=news&article_path=/news/08/news080501_5.htm
       
       
      Indian genocide resolution stirs debate
      Bill cites Sand Creek massacre, removal of Cherokees from Georgia
      By Joe Hanel | Herald Denver Bureau
      May 1, 2008
      DENVER - Lawmakers paused Wednesday for the third time in a week to
      remember a genocide. But this time, the memorial turned into an
      uncomfortable debate about American history.
      Senate Joint Resolution 31 recites the history of horrors that fell upon
      American Indians after European settlement. The native population of 18
      million north of the Rio Grande in the late 1400s had plunged to about 200,
      000 by 1900 - nearly a 99 percent drop.
      But unlike previous condemnations of genocide, Wednesday's vote wasn't
      unanimous.
      "There's a wholesale condemnation of European settlement in this
      resolution that I find troubling," said Rep. Kevin Lundberg, R-Berthoud,
      who voted no.
      Sen. Bill Cadman, R-Colorado Springs, made similar arguments in the
      Senate.
      The House voted 59-4 for the resolution, and the Senate passed it 22-12.
      It was the Legislature's third resolution on genocide in the last week.
      Lawmakers voted unanimously for a Holocaust memorial, and there was just
      one dissenting vote against a memorial of the Ottoman Empire's genocide of
      Armenians in 1915.
      Lawmakers also voted unanimously for a resolution condemning China's
      human-rights record early last month.
      "As we wagged our finger at Turkey about a week ago for not coming face-
      to-face with its own history, we see now how hard it is to come face-to-
      face with our own history," said Rep. Mike May of Parker, the House's top
      Republican, who voted yes.
      All of Southwest Colorado's lawmakers - Sen. Jim Isgar and Reps. Ellen
      Roberts and Ray Rose - voted for the resolution.
      Colorado's executive secretary of the Commission on Indian Affairs,
      Ernest House Jr., joined several members of the Oglala Sioux Tribe and
      other Indians to watch Wednesday's debate. House grew up in McElmo Canyon
      and is a member of the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe.
      Two Denver-area Democrats - Sen. Suzanne Williams and Rep. Debbie
      Stafford - sponsored the resolution. It talks about the disease, war,
      forced migration, starvation and enslavement that American Indians
      suffered.
      The resolution cites the removal of the Cherokees from Georgia and the
      massacre of nearly 200 Indians by the Colorado militia at Sand Creek in
      1864.
      "As Coloradans, I think we need to acknowledge this is part of the
      history of our state," said Rep. Rob Witwer, R-Genesee.
      email author at jhanel@...
      Copyright c. 2008 The Durango Herald. All rights reserved.


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    • Falasha Leott
      This reminds me of the same controversy surrounding Reverend Wright. Also, another villian that has been historically honored is Buffalo Bill Cody. His claim
      Message 2 of 3 , May 7, 2008
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        This reminds me of the same controversy surrounding Reverend Wright. Also, another villian that has been historically honored is Buffalo Bill Cody. His claim to fame was shooting thousands of buffalo. Even as a little girl visiting his memorial, I couldn't figure out what was so great about shooting helpless beasts.


        ----- Original Message ----
        From: Vincent Barrows <v_barrows@...>
        To: ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, May 7, 2008 6:11:18 AM
        Subject: [ancient_waterways_society] native american genocide

        http://www2. tbo.com/content/ 2008/may/ 01/na-american- indian-deaths- called-genocide/ ?news-nationworl d
         
         
        American Indian Deaths Called Genocide
        The Associated Press
        May 1, 2008
        DENVER - The Colorado Legislature passed a resolution Wednesday comparing
        the deaths of millions of American Indians to the Holocaust and other acts
        of genocide around the world.
        The nonbinding measure passed 22-12 in the Senate and 59-4 in the House
        after some lawmakers protested that it unfairly condemned all Europeans
        for injustices against Indians.
        The resolution says Europeans intentionally caused many American Indian
        deaths and that early American settlers often treated Indians with
        "cruelty and inhumanity."
        It specifically mentions the forced removal of the Cherokee Nation in
        1838 and the 1864 Sand Creek massacre in Colorado. It also refers to
        deaths due to disease that were intensified by forced migrations, food
        deprivation and enslavement by Europeans.
        Members of a group of American Indians who came to the Capitol to watch
        the vote said they wanted recognition of what happened to their ancestors.
        "It's nothing personal to the people of today, but we have to recognize
        the past," said Theresa Gutierrez, who works with American Indian students
        at the University of Colorado in Denver.
        Copyright c. 2008 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.
        Tampa Bay Online Copyright c. 2008 Media General Communications
        Holdings, LLC. A Media General company.
         
         
        --------- "RE: Indian Genocide Resolution stirs debate" ---------
         
         
        Date: Fri, 2 May 2008 07:31:13 -0700
        From: Gary Smith <gars@Speakeasy. org>
        Subj: NA News Item
        - - - - - - -<Forwarded news>- - - - - - -
        filename="SOME NOT HAPPY WITH ADMITTING TRUTH"
         
         
        http://www.pechanga .net/
        http://durangoheral d.com/asp- bin/article_ generation. asp?article_type= news&article_path= /news/08/ news080501_ 5.htm
         
         
        Indian genocide resolution stirs debate
        Bill cites Sand Creek massacre, removal of Cherokees from Georgia
        By Joe Hanel | Herald Denver Bureau
        May 1, 2008
        DENVER - Lawmakers paused Wednesday for the third time in a week to
        remember a genocide. But this time, the memorial turned into an
        uncomfortable debate about American history.
        Senate Joint Resolution 31 recites the history of horrors that fell upon
        American Indians after European settlement. The native population of 18
        million north of the Rio Grande in the late 1400s had plunged to about 200,
        000 by 1900 - nearly a 99 percent drop.
        But unlike previous condemnations of genocide, Wednesday's vote wasn't
        unanimous.
        "There's a wholesale condemnation of European settlement in this
        resolution that I find troubling," said Rep. Kevin Lundberg, R-Berthoud,
        who voted no.
        Sen. Bill Cadman, R-Colorado Springs, made similar arguments in the
        Senate.
        The House voted 59-4 for the resolution, and the Senate passed it 22-12.
        It was the Legislature' s third resolution on genocide in the last week.
        Lawmakers voted unanimously for a Holocaust memorial, and there was just
        one dissenting vote against a memorial of the Ottoman Empire's genocide of
        Armenians in 1915.
        Lawmakers also voted unanimously for a resolution condemning China's
        human-rights record early last month.
        "As we wagged our finger at Turkey about a week ago for not coming face-
        to-face with its own history, we see now how hard it is to come face-to-
        face with our own history," said Rep. Mike May of Parker, the House's top
        Republican, who voted yes.
        All of Southwest Colorado's lawmakers - Sen. Jim Isgar and Reps. Ellen
        Roberts and Ray Rose - voted for the resolution.
        Colorado's executive secretary of the Commission on Indian Affairs,
        Ernest House Jr., joined several members of the Oglala Sioux Tribe and
        other Indians to watch Wednesday's debate. House grew up in McElmo Canyon
        and is a member of the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe.
        Two Denver-area Democrats - Sen. Suzanne Williams and Rep. Debbie
        Stafford - sponsored the resolution. It talks about the disease, war,
        forced migration, starvation and enslavement that American Indians
        suffered.
        The resolution cites the removal of the Cherokees from Georgia and the
        massacre of nearly 200 Indians by the Colorado militia at Sand Creek in
        1864.
        "As Coloradans, I think we need to acknowledge this is part of the
        history of our state," said Rep. Rob Witwer, R-Genesee.
        email author at jhanel@durangoheral d.com
        Copyright c. 2008 The Durango Herald. All rights reserved.


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      • Vincent Barrows
        Below is some recent correspondence from expert archaeologist Liz Kassly (finder of the Kassly-Schaefer Tablet and the John Kelly Tablet) and her effort to
        Message 3 of 3 , May 8, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          Below is some recent correspondence from expert archaeologist Liz Kassly (finder of the Kassly-Schaefer Tablet and the John Kelly Tablet) and her effort to preserve mounds and archaeological sites in Fairview Heights . Below Liz Kassly’s excellent article about the importance of preservation is a response from the Fairview Heights City Hall .
            The Kassly-Schaefer Tablet can be seen here:
          http://www.freewebs.com/historyofmonksmound
            
          The John Kelly Tablet can be seen here:
          http://s243.photobucket.com/albums/ff280/Marburg72/KOREA/Dads_retirement_party/PETROGLYPHS/?action=view&current=P1000314.jpg
            
          Thanks
          Vince
            
            
          EYE ON ARCHAEOLOGY
           
           An old friend of mine and I recently had a discussion on the
           preservation of Archaeological sites in the Illinois area - O’Fallon is
           where they built her new church. She said she prayed and prayed that
           they would not find any archaeological remains…so they would not have
           the added cost of having an Indian site excavated. She said that having
           a church was more important than finding an old village site. Yes,
           churches are important as well as houses being built everywhere with the
           influx of people in the area…but prehistory is important also. Once you
           destroy it, it is gone forever and no information can be gleaned from
           it. What if they had destroyed the Dead Sea Scrolls? Those kids that
           found the Scrolls (that were hidden high up the hills in old caves) they
           could have trashed them not even caring what they were. But they knew
           that they were very important and maybe worth a lot of money. They were
           priceless!
           
           Our Illinois prehistoric sites are also priceless…yet many are destroyed
           everyday by construction companies that know how to get around the laws
           set forth by the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency (IHPA). Someone
           has been telling construction companies in O’Fallon how to do just
           that…get around the preservation laws. They first strip down the soils
           with their tractors and build the houses and then apply for water and
           sewer permits for their plat maps. That is so wrong and so illegal. Why
           does the IEPA (Illinois Environmental Protection Agency) allow this to
           happen? In essence what they are doing is destroying important
           information about the past. They are ‘robbing’ citizens like you and I,
           from learning about the Indians of pre-history. There are a few private
           archaeological firms in the area and it has long been suspected that one
           of them has a secret agreement or cooperation with developer’s for the
           illegal and deceitful purpose of writing off these important sites…for a
           payoff. In other words - they don’t give a damn!! My friend who is a
           politician says the city of O’Fallon has it’s own agenda and they don’t
           really care. It’s all about making money!
           
           The O’Fallon Illinois uplands have numerous old village sites that are
           scattered throughout the area. Many of these sites are ‘satellite’
           communities of the Cahokia Mounds Indians. They moved into the hills to
           escape their flooded bottomlands and overpopulation. The rich upland
           soils (of that ancient time) afforded them plentiful harvests of
           vegetables like corn, beans and squash and much more. Deer, bison and
           other small game animals were also plentiful.
           
           As you look out over the fields and rolling hills…remember that others
           were here before us. And when you look out your window and watch the
           quickly disappearing farmlands…I hope you wonder about the history, that
           was below your feet. Was it saved or is it gone forever? Site
           destruction happens everywhere. History always seems to repeat itself.
           The white man was instrumental in destroying the Indians when they were
           alive…and now because of that same greed, some really don’t care and
           destroy what is left of them. It is called ’ignorance’.
           
           A small site in a housing development area is slated for destruction,
           along with eight others (seven sites have already been destroyed in the
           same development). I would like to see them saved, so honest
           archaeologist’s can garnish what little information is left in the soil,
           after the plow and beneath our feet. So much can be learned of the
           ‘people of the past’. Why won’t the developer’s and politician’s let us
           save these sites? What is the cost you ask? Not much compared to the
           price of a little plot of land that is sold to one homeowner. On this
           small site from 1988-1999 I have found thousands of broken shards of
           pottery, small flint tools and flakes of all different shapes and sizes,
           as well as bones, shells and stones. Even more important, I found a
           small fired clay human head about the size of a large marble. Possibly a
           doll’s head made for a small child, it depicts a simple image of a
           prehistoric face from over a 1000 years ago and it provides us a glimpse
           of their past through their art. It’s almost like finding a lost Picasso!
           Let the politician’s of the city of O’Fallon know how you feel about how
           little they care about our important prehistory being destroyed. Please
           call O’Fallon City Hall and let the Mayor (Gary Graham) know how
           outraged you are about the destruction of Archaeological sites in the
           city of O’Fallon . 618 622 9554. We must all use our voices to help save
           these remnants of the past ~ Thankyou Sincerely
           
           Elizabeth A Kassly of Swansea, Illinois
            
            
           From: "Brian Keller" <bkeller3@...
           To: Elizabeth Kassly
           Subject: historic preservation mtg
           Date: Tue, 6 May 2008 21:35:55 -0500
           
           
           Elizabeth ,
           
           Thank you very much for coming to the Historic Preservation
           Commission
           meeting tonight at the Historical Society museum.  Your presentation
           was
           certainly informative and eye-opening.  What you said will most
           certainly be
           a topic of conversation at future meetings.  Since the commission is
           the
           body that recommends sites for protected landmark status, it's
           certainly
           within their charter to discuss.  Archaeological site preservation is
           not a
           direction the commission has gone in the past, but after your talk
           there
           seems to be
           interest in doing so and finding out what our options
           are.  You
           had a receptive audience.  
           
           Historical preservation in O'Fallon, on the local organizational
           level, is
           primarily the work of two groups -- the Historical Society and the
           Historic
           Preservation Commission.  The latter focuses on site and property
           preservation and makes recommendations to the City Council for
          
           historic
           landmarks.  Steve Brown is chairman.  The Historical Society of which
           I'm
           president runs the museum and archives -- a focus on artifact and
           document
           preservation in addition to education.  Would you be interested in
           speaking
           at one of our Historical Society meetings sometime?  The Society
           meets in
           the same room you were tonight except
           on the third Tuesday of each
           month at
           7pm.  People can't get concerned about what they don't know about.
            If you'd
           be interested, let me know and I'll check with our program chairman
           about
           available months.  We'd also be happy to display or make available
           any
           information you'd like share at our museum -- we periodically get
           visitors
           who ask about Native American settlement in the O'Fallon area.  
           
           Thanks again!
           Brian Keller
           


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