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Orkney Islands influential in the design/building of Egyptian Pyramids?

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  • Susan
    Jamie, All, Interesting BBC article about author(s) of Uriel s Machine: The Ancient Origins of Science: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/scotland/1021508.stm
    Message 1 of 4 , May 4, 2008
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      Jamie, All,

      Interesting BBC article about author(s) of Uriel's Machine: The Ancient Origins of Science:

      http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/scotland/1021508.stm 

      "Island brains behind pyramids?"
      Pyramids

      The skills are said to have been exported
      The pyramids of Egypt may have been inspired by a group of builders on the Scottish island of Orkney, according to an academic.

      Dr Robert Lomas, of the University of Bradford, believes complex construction techniques were developed on Orkney more than 1,000 years before the Egyptians used similar ideas.

      He said skills used on the islands from 3800 BC were extremely sophisticated.

      The Egyptians heard of the ideas and copied their techniques after they spread across Europe.

      Astronomer priests

      Dr Lomas said: "These people seem to have been led by a group of astronomer priests who passed on their knowledge to pilgrims all over Britain.

      "Unfortunately, although they were intelligent, they had not developed any type of writing that we are able to read so their discoveries have been forgotten.

      Maes Howe
      Going underground at Maes Howe
      "We can see what they did but have to experiment to find out how they did it."

      At Maes Howe on the Orkney islands - a chambered tomb built around 3000BC - the builders devised a standard unit of length by taking detailed readings from the movement of sun and stars.

      Dr Lomas believes this measurement - the megalithic yard - proves the islanders knew the earth was round.

      They also understood that it moved around the sun centuries before it was generally accepted by the rest of the world.

      Seafaring theory

      The measurement was used to build state-of-the-art monuments, he said.

      In the book Uriel's Machine: The Ancient Origins Of Science, Dr Lomas and co-author Christopher Knight argue that the megalithic yard - which measures 82.966cm - could easily have been taken by seafarers to Brittany and beyond.

      The megalithic yard was first discovered in 1967 by Professor Alexander Thom, of Oxford University, who analysed more than 400 sites around the British Isles and Northern France.

    • james m. clark jr.
      Scotlands name comes from the Egyptian princess Scota. I think she is mentiond in the Irish Annuals. The Irish claim an Etruscan heritage also. But on an
      Message 2 of 4 , May 7, 2008
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        Scotlands name comes from the Egyptian princess Scota. I think she is
        mentiond in the Irish Annuals.

        The Irish claim an Etruscan heritage also. But on an earlier note,
        Milesians as well and even the ancient Lydians who are the Maeonians
        the first to rule the seas. According to Eusebius, (see "Navis") at
        A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890) (eds. William
        Smith, LLD, William Wayte, G. E. Marindin

        http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Perseus:text:1999.04.0063&query=page%3D%231276


        and "The Journal of Hellenic Studies", Vol. XXVII (1907), page 83

        The list given by Eusebius is the same in "The Journal of Hellenic
        Studies" but the leading British Israelite historian ends the sea
        power dates roughly the same and in the same order as Eusebius but
        ends with:

        Aeginetans 10 490- 480

        "In [that year,] Xerxes marches his armies from Asia into Europe."

        Tacitus, as some assume, may have been describing Runic, perhaps
        Etruscan, but as far as the word hundred Caesar describes its use in a
        political sense. Makes me wonder if that would include Lou-lan in the
        Tarim Basin. The Galatians attacked Rome so did the Mongols, but it
        was the Irish, Allen's, and Vandals who cleaned the slate and
        virtually re-educated the modern world. If not, I'll get right one
        day.

        be well,
        jamey



        --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Susan"
        <beldingenglish@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Jamie, All,
        >
        > Interesting BBC article about author(s) of Uriel's Machine: The Ancient
        > Origins of Science:
        >
        > http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/scotland/1021508.stm
        > <http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/scotland/1021508.stm>
        >
        > "Island brains behind pyramids?"
        > [Pyramids]
        >
        > The skills are said to have been exported
        > The pyramids of Egypt may have been inspired by a group of builders on
        > the Scottish island of Orkney, according to an academic.
        > Dr Robert Lomas, of the University of Bradford, believes complex
        > construction techniques were developed on Orkney more than 1,000 years
        > before the Egyptians used similar ideas.
        > He said skills used on the islands from 3800 BC were extremely
        > sophisticated.
        > The Egyptians heard of the ideas and copied their techniques after they
        > spread across Europe.
        > Astronomer priests
        > Dr Lomas said: "These people seem to have been led by a group of
        > astronomer priests who passed on their knowledge to pilgrims all over
        > Britain.
        > "Unfortunately, although they were intelligent, they had not developed
        > any type of writing that we are able to read so their discoveries have
        > been forgotten.
        > [Maes Howe]
        > Going underground at Maes Howe
        > "We can see what they did but have to experiment to find out how they
        > did it."
        > At Maes Howe on the Orkney islands - a chambered tomb built around
        > 3000BC - the builders devised a standard unit of length by taking
        > detailed readings from the movement of sun and stars.
        > Dr Lomas believes this measurement - the megalithic yard - proves the
        > islanders knew the earth was round.
        > They also understood that it moved around the sun centuries before it
        > was generally accepted by the rest of the world.
        > Seafaring theory
        > The measurement was used to build state-of-the-art monuments, he said.
        > In the book Uriel's Machine: The Ancient Origins Of Science, Dr Lomas
        > and co-author Christopher Knight argue that the megalithic yard - which
        > measures 82.966cm - could easily have been taken by seafarers to
        > Brittany and beyond.
        > The megalithic yard was first discovered in 1967 by Professor Alexander
        > Thom, of Oxford University, who analysed more than 400 sites around the
        > British Isles and Northern France.
        >
      • james m. clark jr.
        According to tradition the earliest inhabitants of Attica lived in a savage manner until the time of Cecrops, who came, in 1550 BC, with a colony from Egypt,
        Message 3 of 4 , May 9, 2008
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          "According to tradition the earliest inhabitants of Attica lived in a
          savage manner until the time of Cecrops, who came, in 1550 BC, with a
          colony from Egypt, taught them all the essentials of civilization, and
          founded Athens. One of Cecrops' descendants founded eleven other
          cities in the regions round, and there followed a period of mutual
          hostility."

          http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/cgi-bin/xphrase.pl?keyword=Cecrops

          Scota is given to Miledh/Gathelus, son of Cecrops, also known as
          Calcol from whom all ancient Caladonia is named that is'nt exactly
          in the remote regions round, not by land anyhow, nor by seaway of the
          Pillars of Hercules.

          http://www.pictart.org/historyimages/map_tribes.jpg

          But first, King Nectonibus of Egypt makes Miledh commander of his army
          to deal with the threat of the Ethiopian king at the same time trouble
          was in Athens. While Gathelus is still in Egypt following the victory
          that made him known, he bore two sons from Scotia, namely Eber Finn &
          Amerghin.

          How they reached these distant lands in the North is even more
          fascinating, especially if by ship, which is ironically in recorded
          history.

          In 1995, According to: A History of Pagan Europe, By Prudence Jones &
          Nigel Pennick; Published by Routledge, a startling claim is made about
          the Suebus River being the Oder river durring the era of Tacitus. As
          far as I know they are own there own on this one.

          http://books.google.com/books?id=vYtrv5qD9isC&pg=PA114&lpg=PA114&dq=danube+oder+suebus&source=web&ots=zeApOj4c7L&sig=bgK8NUq_ogzUTm93QiatZ0_GPsQ&hl=en#PPA114,M1

          pages 112 113 & 114 shed some vital information, old recorded sagas,
          especially on ships and goddess, and tribal gods whom are without a
          doubt in my mind were, in some cases historical figures. But unlike a
          Triune doctrine, pagan gods are never equal with their father even if
          its monotheistic, and as old as Egypt. It seems to me that a modern
          projection is more akin to the spread of Manichaism rather than the
          actual records that promote higher education even higher, for without
          it, we would have no advancement or history.

          I have been trying to fizzle through some modern British Israelite
          debates or rather material as there are many errors given to the
          leading scholar on world history, but recorded history is far more
          scholarly than any degree earned.

          be well,
          jamey




          --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "james m. clark jr."
          <jameyboy@...> wrote:
          >
          > Scotlands name comes from the Egyptian princess Scota. I think she is
          > mentiond in the Irish Annuals.
          >
          > The Irish claim an Etruscan heritage also. But on an earlier note,
          > Milesians as well and even the ancient Lydians who are the Maeonians
          > the first to rule the seas. According to Eusebius, (see "Navis") at
          > A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890) (eds. William
          > Smith, LLD, William Wayte, G. E. Marindin
          >
          >
          http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Perseus:text:1999.04.0063&query=page%3D%231276
          >
          >
          > and "The Journal of Hellenic Studies", Vol. XXVII (1907), page 83
          >
          > The list given by Eusebius is the same in "The Journal of Hellenic
          > Studies" but the leading British Israelite historian ends the sea
          > power dates roughly the same and in the same order as Eusebius but
          > ends with:
          >
          > Aeginetans 10 490- 480
          >
          > "In [that year,] Xerxes marches his armies from Asia into Europe."
          >
          > Tacitus, as some assume, may have been describing Runic, perhaps
          > Etruscan, but as far as the word hundred Caesar describes its use in a
          > political sense. Makes me wonder if that would include Lou-lan in the
          > Tarim Basin. The Galatians attacked Rome so did the Mongols, but it
          > was the Irish, Allen's, and Vandals who cleaned the slate and
          > virtually re-educated the modern world. If not, I'll get right one
          > day.
          >
          > be well,
          > jamey
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Susan"
          > <beldingenglish@> wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > > Jamie, All,
          > >
          > > Interesting BBC article about author(s) of Uriel's Machine: The
          Ancient
          > > Origins of Science:
          > >
          > > http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/scotland/1021508.stm
          > > <http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/scotland/1021508.stm>
          > >
          > > "Island brains behind pyramids?"
          > > [Pyramids]
          > >
          > > The skills are said to have been exported
          > > The pyramids of Egypt may have been inspired by a group of builders on
          > > the Scottish island of Orkney, according to an academic.
          > > Dr Robert Lomas, of the University of Bradford, believes complex
          > > construction techniques were developed on Orkney more than 1,000 years
          > > before the Egyptians used similar ideas.
          > > He said skills used on the islands from 3800 BC were extremely
          > > sophisticated.
          > > The Egyptians heard of the ideas and copied their techniques after
          they
          > > spread across Europe.
          > > Astronomer priests
          > > Dr Lomas said: "These people seem to have been led by a group of
          > > astronomer priests who passed on their knowledge to pilgrims all over
          > > Britain.
          > > "Unfortunately, although they were intelligent, they had not developed
          > > any type of writing that we are able to read so their discoveries have
          > > been forgotten.
          > > [Maes Howe]
          > > Going underground at Maes Howe
          > > "We can see what they did but have to experiment to find out how they
          > > did it."
          > > At Maes Howe on the Orkney islands - a chambered tomb built around
          > > 3000BC - the builders devised a standard unit of length by taking
          > > detailed readings from the movement of sun and stars.
          > > Dr Lomas believes this measurement - the megalithic yard - proves the
          > > islanders knew the earth was round.
          > > They also understood that it moved around the sun centuries before it
          > > was generally accepted by the rest of the world.
          > > Seafaring theory
          > > The measurement was used to build state-of-the-art monuments, he said.
          > > In the book Uriel's Machine: The Ancient Origins Of Science, Dr Lomas
          > > and co-author Christopher Knight argue that the megalithic yard -
          which
          > > measures 82.966cm - could easily have been taken by seafarers to
          > > Brittany and beyond.
          > > The megalithic yard was first discovered in 1967 by Professor
          Alexander
          > > Thom, of Oxford University, who analysed more than 400 sites
          around the
          > > British Isles and Northern France.
          > >
          >
        • Chris Patenaude
          Susan, great link!! This paragraph tickled my fancy... At Maes Howe on the Orkney islands - a chambered tomb built around 3000BC - the builders devised a
          Message 4 of 4 , May 15, 2008
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            Susan, great link!!
            This paragraph tickled my fancy...

            "At Maes Howe on the Orkney islands - a chambered tomb
            built around 3000BC - the builders devised a standard
            unit of length by taking detailed readings from the
            movement of sun and stars.

            Dr Lomas believes this measurement - the megalithic
            yard - proves the islanders knew the earth was round.

            They also understood that it moved around the sun
            centuries before it was generally accepted by the rest
            of the world."

            Again, confirmation of Crichton Miller's
            re-discoveries!
            -c
            --- Susan <beldingenglish@...> wrote:

            >
            > Jamie, All,
            >
            > Interesting BBC article about author(s) of Uriel's
            > Machine: The Ancient
            > Origins of Science:
            >
            >
            http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/scotland/1021508.stm
            >
            <http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/scotland/1021508.stm>
            >
            > "Island brains behind pyramids?"
            > [Pyramids]
            >
            > The skills are said to have been exported
            > The pyramids of Egypt may have been inspired by a
            > group of builders on
            > the Scottish island of Orkney, according to an
            > academic.
            > Dr Robert Lomas, of the University of Bradford,
            > believes complex
            > construction techniques were developed on Orkney
            > more than 1,000 years
            > before the Egyptians used similar ideas.
            > He said skills used on the islands from 3800 BC were
            > extremely
            > sophisticated.
            > The Egyptians heard of the ideas and copied their
            > techniques after they
            > spread across Europe.
            > Astronomer priests
            > Dr Lomas said: "These people seem to have been led
            > by a group of
            > astronomer priests who passed on their knowledge to
            > pilgrims all over
            > Britain.
            > "Unfortunately, although they were intelligent, they
            > had not developed
            > any type of writing that we are able to read so
            > their discoveries have
            > been forgotten.
            > [Maes Howe]
            > Going underground at Maes Howe
            > "We can see what they did but have to experiment to
            > find out how they
            > did it."
            > At Maes Howe on the Orkney islands - a chambered
            > tomb built around
            > 3000BC - the builders devised a standard unit of
            > length by taking
            > detailed readings from the movement of sun and
            > stars.
            > Dr Lomas believes this measurement - the megalithic
            > yard - proves the
            > islanders knew the earth was round.
            > They also understood that it moved around the sun
            > centuries before it
            > was generally accepted by the rest of the world.
            > Seafaring theory
            > The measurement was used to build state-of-the-art
            > monuments, he said.
            > In the book Uriel's Machine: The Ancient Origins Of
            > Science, Dr Lomas
            > and co-author Christopher Knight argue that the
            > megalithic yard - which
            > measures 82.966cm - could easily have been taken by
            > seafarers to
            > Brittany and beyond.
            > The megalithic yard was first discovered in 1967 by
            > Professor Alexander
            > Thom, of Oxford University, who analysed more than
            > 400 sites around the
            > British Isles and Northern France.
            >
            >
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