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Re: Illinois quake

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  • bigalemc2
    Most of you probably know by now, but the Illinois quake was along the Wabash Valley Fault Line. This is along the Wabash River, which forms the lower 1/3 of
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 20, 2008
      Most of you probably know by now, but the Illinois quake was along the Wabash Valley Fault Line.  This is along the Wabash River, which forms the lower 1/3 of the Illinois-Indiana border.

      As explained much better than is often done on CNN, with great maps, the Wabash Valley system appears to be an extension of the New Madrid system, but no fault lines were shown mapped across the center of southern Illinois.  Both systems have fault lines running SW-to-NE.

      The epicenter was about 26 miles SW of Vincennes, Indiana, and 6 miles east of Bone Gap, IL.  I've never heard of Bone Gap.  Olney is 22 miles NNW of the epicenter.

      . . . . Steve


      --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Susan" <beldingenglish@...> wrote:
      All,
       
       Ancient Waterways member and engineer Vince Barrows from Illinois near St. Louis sent the following response to host Mike White at the PreColumbian Inscriptions site yesterday (see other posts at this excellent epigraphy group):
       http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/Precolumbian_Inscriptions/message/108\06
      http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/Precolumbian_Inscriptions/message/10\806

      Does anyone know if the earthquake was along the Madrid fault?

      Rick Osman and his wife felt the quake in SW Indiana; my son and his wife did too near Chicago. And several people emailed to ask how the 5.3 affected Burrows Cave excavations near Olney. Wayne had said in an earlier phone conversation they are waiting for flood levels to subside before proceeding further. John White of Midwest Epigraphic Society emailed also on Friday that Wayne May was heading for Ohio to speak (yesterday) before one of the groups there.

    • Rick Osmon
      The Wabash Fault Zone is a hodgepodge of intersecting fault lines. I ve talked to several geology majors and none could explain how this occurred. Yes, the
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 21, 2008
        The Wabash Fault Zone is a hodgepodge of intersecting fault lines. I've talked to several geology majors and none could explain how this occurred. Yes, the largest is right along the river. The zone extends to intersect the main fault and one of the secondary faults of New Madrid, under far western Kentucky,  and towards central Indiana.

        The only similar fault system I've been able to identify is under the southern end of the Arabian Peninsula and is also similar in its level of activity.

        Both areas are known for natural gas deposits and I've often wondered if the multiple fault lines are the result of a collapse of the gas dome after a major venting. Geologists usually attribute the "sand blows" or  "sand volcanoes " to seismic events, but a venting might have the same effect. The photo in the link is also close to the North Sea gas dome.

        There is also the question of: If petroleum was formed from diatoms, why is it always below the limestone dome? I think these things are probably all closely related, but I'm not the geologist.

        Oz


        --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "bigalemc2" <puppet@...> wrote:
        >
        > Most of you probably know by now, but the Illinois quake was along the
        > Wabash Valley Fault Line. This is along the Wabash River, which forms
        > the lower 1/3 of the Illinois-Indiana border.
        >
        > As explained much better than is often done on CNN, with great maps, the
        > Wabash Valley system appears to be an extension of the New Madrid
        > system, but no fault lines were shown mapped across the center of
        > southern Illinois. Both systems have fault lines running SW-to-NE.
        >
        > The epicenter was about 26 miles SW of Vincennes, Indiana, and 6 miles
        > east of Bone Gap, IL. I've never heard of Bone Gap. Olney is 22 miles
        > NNW of the epicenter.
        >
        > . . . . Steve
        >
        >
        > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Susan"
        > beldingenglish@ wrote:
        > All,
        >
        > Ancient Waterways member and engineer Vince Barrows from Illinois near
        > St. Louis sent the following response to host Mike White at the
        > PreColumbian Inscriptions site yesterday (see other posts at this
        > excellent epigraphy group):
        >
        > http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/Precolumbian_Inscriptions/message/108\
        > \06
        > http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/Precolumbian_Inscriptions/message/10\\
        > 806
        >
        > Does anyone know if the earthquake was along the Madrid fault?
        >
        > Rick Osman and his wife felt the quake in SW Indiana; my son and his
        > wife did too near Chicago. And several people emailed to ask how the 5.3
        > affected Burrows Cave excavations near Olney. Wayne had said in an
        > earlier phone conversation they are waiting for flood levels to subside
        > before proceeding further. John White of Midwest Epigraphic Society
        > emailed also on Friday that Wayne May was heading for Ohio to speak
        > (yesterday) before one of the groups there.
        >
      • bigalemc2
        Rick - Cool info. Thanks! I can t remember if I ve mentioned Thomas Gold. (See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Gold) He had a theory about the formation
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 21, 2008
          Rick -

          Cool info. Thanks!

          I can't remember if I've mentioned Thomas Gold. (See
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Gold) He had a theory about the
          formation of oil that is at complete odds with the prevailing
          paradigm. I think it holds water - and oil, too.

          Gold asserted that oil is actually formed down in the mantle and has
          nothing at all to do with Permian swamps and decaying vegetation. He
          says that at the temps and pressures way down there, there are
          microbes that digest hydrocarbons, and that their byproducts are
          petroleum. He said that the fact that microbes are found
          in the oil is because the microbes were digesting the hydrocarbons.

          The paradigm about salt domes, which we all learned in school, has
          long since been found to be incorrect, as oil is found in many
          different formations. (All the gloom and doom about oil running out
          has been repeated several times in the relatively short history of
          petroleum. Discoveries in new kinds of formations have extended the
          known reserves over and over.)

          Gold's theory of oil being formed in the Deep Biosphere also means
          that, since the swamps are not the source (if he was correct), that
          oil is not a finite, non-replenishable resource. This is actually
          supported by the fact that depleted oil fields have been known to
          "somehow" replenish - to have more oil show up later, after the fields
          are emptied. The main stream explanation for this is that the oil
          seeps in from neighboring sources, laterally.

          Though Gold was a member in very good stead in the National Academy of
          Sciences, on this issue he was thought to be a kook of sorts. Having
          read his book, I think he is onto something.

          Time will tell if Gold was correct or not. I present it here to open
          minds a bit, and as a possible answer to Risk's question.

          The fact that the oil was UNDER the domes does suggest that the
          petroleum came from below and was trapped in its upward rise, does it
          not?

          The Wikipedia article on Gold explains all this very concisely, and
          presents the opposition arguments, also.

          . . . . Steve


          --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Rick Osmon"
          <ozman@...> wrote:
          >
          > The Wabash Fault Zone is a hodgepodge of intersecting fault lines.
          I've
          > talked to several geology majors and none could explain how this
          > occurred. Yes, the largest is right along the river. The zone extends
          to
          > intersect the main fault and one of the secondary faults of New
          Madrid,
          > under far western Kentucky, and towards central Indiana.
          >
          > The only similar fault system I've been able to identify is under the
          > southern end of the Arabian Peninsula and is also similar in its level
          > of activity.
          >
          > Both areas are known for natural gas deposits and I've often wondered
          if
          > the multiple fault lines are the result of a collapse of the gas dome
          > after a major venting. Geologists usually attribute the "sand blows"
          or
          > "sand volcanoes <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sand_volcano> " to
          > seismic events, but a venting might have the same effect. The photo in
          > the link is also close to the North Sea gas dome.
          >
          > There is also the question of: If petroleum was formed from diatoms,
          why
          > is it always below the limestone dome? I think these things are
          probably
          > all closely related, but I'm not the geologist.
          >
          > Oz
        • Vincent Barrows
          Another 4.2 magnitude quake occurred today at 12:31 in illinois. Attached is a graph of the quakes from the last month. The the graph shows that the magnitude
          Message 4 of 9 , Apr 25, 2008
            Another 4.2 magnitude quake occurred today at 12:31 in illinois.
            Attached is a graph of the quakes from the last month. The the graph shows that the magnitude of the quakes is increasing around the world.
            Vince

            bigalemc2 <puppet@...> wrote:
            Most of you probably know by now, but the Illinois quake was along the Wabash Valley Fault Line.  This is along the Wabash River, which forms the lower 1/3 of the Illinois-Indiana border.

            As explained much better than is often done on CNN, with great maps, the Wabash Valley system appears to be an extension of the New Madrid system, but no fault lines were shown mapped across the center of southern Illinois.  Both systems have fault lines running SW-to-NE.

            The epicenter was about 26 miles SW of Vincennes, Indiana, and 6 miles east of Bone Gap, IL.  I've never heard of Bone Gap.  Olney is 22 miles NNW of the epicenter.

            . . . . Steve


            --- In ancient_waterways_ society@yahoogro ups.com, "Susan" <beldingenglish@ ...> wrote:
            All,
             
             Ancient Waterways member and engineer Vince Barrows from Illinois near St. Louis sent the following response to host Mike White at the PreColumbian Inscriptions site yesterday (see other posts at this excellent epigraphy group):
             http://tech. groups.yahoo. com/group/ Precolumbian_ Inscriptions/ message/108\ 06
            http://tech. groups.yahoo. com/group/ Precolumbian_ Inscriptions/ message/10\ 806

            Does anyone know if the earthquake was along the Madrid fault?

            Rick Osman and his wife felt the quake in SW Indiana; my son and his wife did too near Chicago. And several people emailed to ask how the 5.3 affected Burrows Cave excavations near Olney. Wayne had said in an earlier phone conversation they are waiting for flood levels to subside before proceeding further. John White of Midwest Epigraphic Society emailed also on Friday that Wayne May was heading for Ohio to speak (yesterday) before one of the groups there.



            Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.

          • Chris Patenaude
            Rick, im inna rush, gotta scoot. But Google THIS!! ah ah! Petroleum oil is NOT a fossil substance. Russian and many American geologists are beginning to stand
            Message 5 of 9 , Apr 28, 2008
              Rick, im inna rush, gotta scoot.
              But Google THIS!! ah ah!
              Petroleum oil is NOT a fossil substance. Russian and
              many American geologists are beginning to stand up
              against a brick wall of American scientific dogma
              (same as diffusionists battle against collegiate
              Historians) but with proof that oil is a mineral,
              earth-derived, geo-created substance, not an organic
              residue. It is not endless, but not nearly so 'finite'
              as a 'non-renewable' resource, as once thought. The
              earth is busy, somewhere, making more right now as we
              speak. I'm not clear at all about the details,
              however.

              Now COAL is organic. But not Petrol, according to
              cutting edge technology (American POV) but having well
              established acceptance in Russian science circles.
              Can anyone surf for that?

              Whizzin out the door...
              -c
              --- Rick Osmon <ozman@...> wrote:

              > The Wabash Fault Zone is a hodgepodge of
              > intersecting fault lines. I've
              > talked to several geology majors and none could
              > explain how this
              > occurred. Yes, the largest is right along the river.
              > The zone extends to
              > intersect the main fault and one of the secondary
              > faults of New Madrid,
              > under far western Kentucky, and towards central
              > Indiana.
              >
              > The only similar fault system I've been able to
              > identify is under the
              > southern end of the Arabian Peninsula and is also
              > similar in its level
              > of activity.
              >
              > Both areas are known for natural gas deposits and
              > I've often wondered if
              > the multiple fault lines are the result of a
              > collapse of the gas dome
              > after a major venting. Geologists usually attribute
              > the "sand blows" or
              > "sand volcanoes
              > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sand_volcano> " to
              > seismic events, but a venting might have the same
              > effect. The photo in
              > the link is also close to the North Sea gas dome.
              >
              > There is also the question of: If petroleum was
              > formed from diatoms, why
              > is it always below the limestone dome? I think these
              > things are probably
              > all closely related, but I'm not the geologist.
              >
              > Oz
              >
              >
              > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com,
              > "bigalemc2"
              > <puppet@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > Most of you probably know by now, but the Illinois
              > quake was along the
              > > Wabash Valley Fault Line. This is along the
              > Wabash River, which forms
              > > the lower 1/3 of the Illinois-Indiana border.
              > >
              > > As explained much better than is often done on
              > CNN, with great maps,
              > the
              > > Wabash Valley system appears to be an extension of
              > the New Madrid
              > > system, but no fault lines were shown mapped
              > across the center of
              > > southern Illinois. Both systems have fault lines
              > running SW-to-NE.
              > >
              > > The epicenter was about 26 miles SW of Vincennes,
              > Indiana, and 6 miles
              > > east of Bone Gap, IL. I've never heard of Bone
              > Gap. Olney is 22
              > miles
              > > NNW of the epicenter.
              > >
              > > . . . . Steve
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com,
              > "Susan"
              > > beldingenglish@ wrote:
              > > All,
              > >
              > > Ancient Waterways member and engineer Vince
              > Barrows from Illinois
              > near
              > > St. Louis sent the following response to host
              > Mike White at the
              > > PreColumbian Inscriptions site yesterday (see
              > other posts at this
              > > excellent epigraphy group):
              > >
              > >
              >
              http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/Precolumbian_Inscriptions/message/108\
              > \
              > > \06
              > >
              >
              http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/Precolumbian_Inscriptions/message/10\\
              > \
              > > 806
              > >
              > > Does anyone know if the earthquake was along the
              > Madrid fault?
              > >
              > > Rick Osman and his wife felt the quake in SW
              > Indiana; my son and his
              > > wife did too near Chicago. And several people
              > emailed to ask how the
              > 5.3
              > > affected Burrows Cave excavations near Olney.
              > Wayne had said in an
              > > earlier phone conversation they are waiting for
              > flood levels to
              > subside
              > > before proceeding further. John White of Midwest
              > Epigraphic Society
              > > emailed also on Friday that Wayne May was heading
              > for Ohio to speak
              > > (yesterday) before one of the groups there.
              > >
              >
              >



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            • bigalemc2
              Chris - Hi. It seems you are talking about the abiogenic theory of oil. See message #530 below. I was excited about it and am into it as much as you seem to
              Message 6 of 9 , Apr 28, 2008
                Chris -

                Hi.  It seems you are talking about the abiogenic theory of oil.  See message #530 below.  I was excited about it and am into it as much as you seem to be.

                I would love it if your comment about a lot of scientists being behind it were true.  I haven't yet found anything but scorn at the theory, at least in U.S. circles.  Whatever you have found, point me to it.

                BTW, this is for the most part an off-topic post, as was my own for the most part.  I was rsponding to a comment by Rick about oil being UNDER domes.  If you want to carry this discussion via email, my address is shown.  (I assume others won't want this cluttering up the forum.)

                In the meantime, I can recommend Thomas Gold's The Deep, Hot Biosphere .

                Steve

                --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, Chris Patenaude <yacrispyubetcha@...> wrote:
                >
                > Rick, im inna rush, gotta scoot.
                > But Google THIS!! ah ah!
                > Petroleum oil is NOT a fossil substance. Russian and
                > many American geologists are beginning to stand up
                > against a brick wall of American scientific dogma
                > (same as diffusionists battle against collegiate
                > Historians) but with proof that oil is a mineral,
                > earth-derived, geo-created substance, not an organic
                > residue. It is not endless, but not nearly so 'finite'
                > as a 'non-renewable' resource, as once thought. The
                > earth is busy, somewhere, making more right now as we
                > speak. I'm not clear at all about the details,
                > however.
                >
                > Now COAL is organic. But not Petrol, according to
                > cutting edge technology (American POV) but having well
                > established acceptance in Russian science circles.
                > Can anyone surf for that?
                >
                > Whizzin out the door...
                > -c

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