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  • Ted Sojka
    These are now called the dancing bears, with some objecting to the military image of the former name. These were seen by many soldiers on the road just along
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 16, 2013
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    These are now called the dancing bears, with some objecting to the
    military image of the former name.
    These were seen by many soldiers on the road just along side the mound
    group that connected the fort
    at Prairie du Chien across the river to Fort Atkinson. This was the
    "only fort built to protect an indian tribe.",
    says a sign at that fort.

    This of course begs the question why any self respecting first nation
    tribe needed help in doing that.
    That is a book of a story, with several being written after the Black
    Hawk War that lead up to the reason
    that the Winnebago needed protection from their traditional enemies,
    the Sac and Fox and the Sioux.
  • Ryan Howell
    Of course the reason the Ho-Chunk ended up there was because they were marched out of their traditional homeland in Western Wisconsin, literally, at bayonet
    Message 2 of 6 , Nov 16, 2013
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      Of course the reason the Ho-Chunk ended up there was because they were marched out of their traditional homeland in Western Wisconsin, literally, at bayonet point (see the "Surrender of Dandy's Band" in WHC) and after several killings by U.S. Troops. A close reading of some of the Indian agent documents and letters from Fort Crawford (Prairie du Chien,WI) and Fort Winnebago (Portage, WI) agencies seems to suggest that this was very deliberate. By placing the Winnebago/Ho-Chunk between two more numerous enemies it was felt that two "problems" could be solved simultaneously: (1) two larger, aggressive groups not yet under U.S. control (the Dakota and Sauk/Fox) could be buffered from each other and (2) a smaller, but continuously difficult to control group (the Ho-Chunk) would naturally either be wiped out or forced to submit to progessively even greater U.S. government and military control.

      Diabolical U.S./Native American realpolitik in case study.


      Ryan J. Howell, MA, RPA, CMA.
      Senior Project Archaeologist
      U.S. Army (Contractor)-CEMML-CSU
      Fort McCoy, WI 54656
      507-993-9643
      CSUID# 827278320




      These are now called the dancing bears, with some objecting to the
      military image of the former name.
      These were seen by many soldiers on the road just along side the mound
      group that connected the fort
      at Prairie du Chien across the river to Fort Atkinson. This was the
      "only fort built to protect an indian tribe.",
      says a sign at that fort.

      This of course begs the question why any self respecting first nation
      tribe needed help in doing that.
      That is a book of a story, with several being written after the Black
      Hawk War that lead up to the reason
      that the Winnebago needed protection from their traditional enemies,
      the Sac and Fox and the Sioux.


    • Ted Sojka
      Thanks Ryan, Yes, and to add insult to the injury, their reward for helping the US locate Black Hawk, they had their lands taken away and were put in to the
      Message 3 of 6 , Nov 16, 2013
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        Thanks Ryan,

        Yes, and to add insult to the injury, their reward for helping the US locate Black Hawk, they had their lands taken away and were put in to the Demilitarized Zone called the Neutral Ground, across the river in Iowa.

        This was initially to keep the Sioux and Sac-Fox apart and from waring.  As this area was empty and things had settled down somewhat, the solution of the time was to put the removed Winnebago Ho Chunk there as a holding area.  It did not work out well and when the soldiers were needed on the Mexincan border, they abandoned the fort and a trail of tears for the Winnebago started to Winona, then St. Paul at Fort Snelling.  

        A sad story that I hoped the yearly Rendez-vous at the fort started by a local historical group would educate the public on the true reason the fort was built.

        The story is told in Spencer Lone Trees books as well as others.  He is related to both the DeCora's and the Winneshieks.  Thanks for contributing to this story. 


        On Nov 16, 2013, at 8:54 AM, Ryan Howell wrote:

         


        Of course the reason the Ho-Chunk ended up there was because they were marched out of their traditional homeland in Western Wisconsin, literally, at bayonet point (see the "Surrender of Dandy's Band" in WHC) and after several killings by U.S. Troops. A close reading of some of the Indian agent documents and letters from Fort Crawford (Prairie du Chien,WI) and Fort Winnebago (Portage, WI) agencies seems to suggest that this was very deliberate. By placing the Winnebago/Ho-Chunk between two more numerous enemies it was felt that two "problems" could be solved simultaneously: (1) two larger, aggressive groups not yet under U.S. control (the Dakota and Sauk/Fox) could be buffered from each other and (2) a smaller, but continuously difficult to control group (the Ho-Chunk) would naturally either be wiped out or forced to submit to progessively even greater U.S. government and military control.

        Diabolical U.S./Native American realpolitik in case study.


        Ryan J. Howell, MA, RPA, CMA.
        Senior Project Archaeologist
        U.S. Army (Contractor)-CEMML-CSU
        Fort McCoy, WI 54656
        507-993-9643
        CSUID# 827278320




        These are now called the dancing bears, with some objecting to the
        military image of the former name.
        These were seen by many soldiers on the road just along side the mound
        group that connected the fort
        at Prairie du Chien across the river to Fort Atkinson. This was the
        "only fort built to protect an indian tribe.",
        says a sign at that fort.

        This of course begs the question why any self respecting first nation
        tribe needed help in doing that.
        That is a book of a story, with several being written after the Black
        Hawk War that lead up to the reason
        that the Winnebago needed protection from their traditional enemies,
        the Sac and Fox and the Sioux.




      • Ryan Howell
        Do you have a title for the Lone Tree books? Sounds like something I would enjoy. Thanks, Ryan On Saturday, November 16, 2013 12:36 PM, Ted Sojka
        Message 4 of 6 , Nov 16, 2013
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          Do you have a title for the Lone Tree books? Sounds like something I would enjoy.

          Thanks,

          Ryan



          On Saturday, November 16, 2013 12:36 PM, Ted Sojka <tedsojka@...> wrote:
           
          Thanks Ryan,

          Yes, and to add insult to the injury, their reward for helping the US locate Black Hawk, they had their lands taken away and were put in to the Demilitarized Zone called the Neutral Ground, across the river in Iowa.

          This was initially to keep the Sioux and Sac-Fox apart and from waring.  As this area was empty and things had settled down somewhat, the solution of the time was to put the removed Winnebago Ho Chunk there as a holding area.  It did not work out well and when the soldiers were needed on the Mexincan border, they abandoned the fort and a trail of tears for the Winnebago started to Winona, then St. Paul at Fort Snelling.  

          A sad story that I hoped the yearly Rendez-vous at the fort started by a local historical group would educate the public on the true reason the fort was built.

          The story is told in Spencer Lone Trees books as well as others.  He is related to both the DeCora's and the Winneshieks.  Thanks for contributing to this story. 


          On Nov 16, 2013, at 8:54 AM, Ryan Howell wrote:

           


          Of course the reason the Ho-Chunk ended up there was because they were marched out of their traditional homeland in Western Wisconsin, literally, at bayonet point (see the "Surrender of Dandy's Band" in WHC) and after several killings by U.S. Troops. A close reading of some of the Indian agent documents and letters from Fort Crawford (Prairie du Chien,WI) and Fort Winnebago (Portage, WI) agencies seems to suggest that this was very deliberate. By placing the Winnebago/Ho-Chunk between two more numerous enemies it was felt that two "problems" could be solved simultaneously: (1) two larger, aggressive groups not yet under U.S. control (the Dakota and Sauk/Fox) could be buffered from each other and (2) a smaller, but continuously difficult to control group (the Ho-Chunk) would naturally either be wiped out or forced to submit to progessively even greater U.S. government and military control.

          Diabolical U.S./Native American realpolitik in case study.


          Ryan J. Howell, MA, RPA, CMA.
          Senior Project Archaeologist
          U.S. Army (Contractor)-CEMML-CSU
          Fort McCoy, WI 54656
          507-993-9643
          CSUID# 827278320




          These are now called the dancing bears, with some objecting to the
          military image of the former name.
          These were seen by many soldiers on the road just along side the mound
          group that connected the fort
          at Prairie du Chien across the river to Fort Atkinson. This was the
          "only fort built to protect an indian tribe.",
          says a sign at that fort.

          This of course begs the question why any self respecting first nation
          tribe needed help in doing that.
          That is a book of a story, with several being written after the Black
          Hawk War that lead up to the reason
          that the Winnebago needed protection from their traditional enemies,
          the Sac and Fox and the Sioux.






        • Ted Sojka
          They are a children s series called the Night Sun. Night Sun and the Two Fires , Night Sun and the Seven Arrows , and your librarian should be able to find
          Message 5 of 6 , Nov 16, 2013
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            They are a children's series called the Night Sun.  " Night Sun and the Two Fires", "Night Sun and the Seven Arrows", and your librarian should be able to find them.  His parents were from each of the Decorah and Winneshiek bands.  I would think they have them in Black River Falls at the tribal headquarters or in a town book store. 

            If you have any community speaker organization where you are located, he also is good speaker, and would have stories about the area to share.  

            There were several biographies of Black Hawk that told part of the story an the History of Winneshiek County tells a bit.  The definitive work is "Twilight of Empire", by Eckhardt. (?)

            Ted 

            PS Have you ever been to Fort Atkinson Iowa to see the fort?   Several digs were done by the state archeologist at the site to determine things about how the soldiers lived there.  Privies are the cache pits of that area for artifacts.  



            On Nov 16, 2013, at 2:08 PM, Ryan Howell wrote:

             

            Do you have a title for the Lone Tree books? Sounds like something I would enjoy.

            Thanks,

            Ryan










          • Ryan Howell
            Thanks Ted. No, I have never made it to Atkinson yet, although by now I should have. Certainly passed by it quite a bit. I have visited or worked on most of
            Message 6 of 6 , Nov 16, 2013
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              Thanks Ted. No, I have never made it to Atkinson yet, although by now I should have. Certainly passed by it quite a bit. I have visited or worked on most of the other Upper Midwest forts of that era (Crawford, Winnebago, Madison, Snelling etc.). I will check out the LoneTree series. Thanks for the recommendation.

              RJH



              On Saturday, November 16, 2013 2:46 PM, Ted Sojka <tedsojka@...> wrote:
               
              They are a children's series called the Night Sun.  " Night Sun and the Two Fires", "Night Sun and the Seven Arrows", and your librarian should be able to find them.  His parents were from each of the Decorah and Winneshiek bands.  I would think they have them in Black River Falls at the tribal headquarters or in a town book store. 

              If you have any community speaker organization where you are located, he also is good speaker, and would have stories about the area to share.  

              There were several biographies of Black Hawk that told part of the story an the History of Winneshiek County tells a bit.  The definitive work is "Twilight of Empire", by Eckhardt. (?)

              Ted 

              PS Have you ever been to Fort Atkinson Iowa to see the fort?   Several digs were done by the state archeologist at the site to determine things about how the soldiers lived there.  Privies are the cache pits of that area for artifacts.  



              On Nov 16, 2013, at 2:08 PM, Ryan Howell wrote:

               

              Do you have a title for the Lone Tree books? Sounds like something I would enjoy.

              Thanks,

              Ryan












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