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Stone Mound along one of the canals of Ohio

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  • Ted Sojka
    The Mound Builders by J.P. McLean 1879 Licking County, Ohio Perhaps the largest and finest stone mound in Ohio was that which stood about eight miles south of
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 13, 2013
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      The Mound Builders by J.P. McLean 1879
      Licking County, Ohio

      Perhaps the largest and finest stone mound in Ohio was that which stood about eight miles south of Newark, and one mile east of the reservoir on the Licking Summit of the Ohio canal. It wasa composed of stones found onm the adjacent grounds, laid up, without cement, to the height of about fifty feet, with a circular base of one hundred and eighty-two feet if diameter. It was surrounded by a low embankment of an oval form, accompanied by a ditch, and having a gateway at the east end. When the reservoir, which is seven miles long, was made, in order to protect the east bank, so that it might be used for navigation, the stones from this mound were removed for that purpose. During the years 1831-32 not less than fifty teams were employed in hauling them, carrrying away from ten thousand to fifteen thousand wagon loads. Near the circumference of the base of the mound wewrediscovered fifteen or sixteen small earth mounds, and a similar one in the center. These small mounds were not examined until 1850, when two of them were opened by some of the neighboring farmers. In one were found human bones with some fluviatile shells, and in the other, two feet below a layer of hard, white fire clay, they came upon a trough, covered by small logs, and in it was found a human skeleton, around which appeared the impression of coarse cloth. With the skeleton were found fifteen copper rings and a breastplate or badge. The wood of the trough was in a good state of preservation, the clay over it being impervious to both air and water. The central mound was afterwards opened and found to contain a great many human bones, but no other relics of any note. All of these mounds, so far as they have been explored, contain earth from a distance- the fire clay having been brought from Flint Ridge, six or eight miles distant.
    • Karla Akins
      Fascinating. Karla Akins The Pastor s Wife Wears Biker
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 16, 2013
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        Fascinating.



        On Tue, Aug 13, 2013 at 1:55 PM, Ted Sojka <tedsojka@...> wrote:



        The Mound Builders by J.P. McLean 1879
        Licking County, Ohio

        Perhaps the largest and finest stone mound in Ohio was that which stood about eight miles south of Newark, and one mile east of the reservoir on the Licking Summit of the Ohio canal. It wasa composed of stones found onm the adjacent grounds, laid up, without cement, to the height of about fifty feet, with a circular base of one hundred and eighty-two feet if diameter. It was surrounded by a low embankment of an oval form, accompanied by a ditch, and having a gateway at the east end. When the reservoir, which is seven miles long, was made, in order to protect the east bank, so that it might be used for navigation, the stones from this mound were removed for that purpose. During the years 1831-32 not less than fifty teams were employed in hauling them, carrrying away from ten thousand to fifteen thousand wagon loads. Near the circumference of the base of the mound wewrediscovered fifteen or sixteen small earth mounds, and a similar one in the center. These small mounds were not examined until 1850, when two of them were opened by some of the neighboring farmers. In one were found human bones with some fluviatile shells, and in the other, two feet below a layer of hard, white fire clay, they came upon a trough, covered by small logs, and in it was found a human skeleton, around which appeared the impression of coarse cloth. With the skeleton were found fifteen copper rings and a breastplate or badge. The wood of the trough was in a good state of preservation, the clay over it being impervious to both air and water. The central mound was afterwards opened and found to contain a great many human bones, but no other relics of any note. All of these mounds, so far as they have been explored, contain earth from a distance- the fire clay having been brought from Flint Ridge, six or eight miles distant.

      • william smith
           This is very interesting and may help explain the degree of technology of the ancient people in Ohio. The following sites may be related to this
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 17, 2013
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             This is very interesting and may help explain the degree of technology of the ancient people in Ohio. The following sites may be related to this structure. A- The Hopewell road seems to go from Newark to the Ohio river. This road was about 100 yards wide and very straight. It had 2 ft. high walls on each side and stone base near Newark. Brad Lepper (Ohio Historical Society) published a book called The Hopewell Road. My personal feelings on this road is that it was used to contain the small legged bison. This theory is supported by the bones and arrow or spear points found on this road.. The other potential related site is the Newark earthworks which were investigated by Prof. Shively and Horn from Earlem college about 10 years ago. Their report indicates the site was very advanced in math more than Stonehenge. The Decologe stone, holy stone and stone cup found near Newark which contain evidence of early Hebrew are also interesting. The fact that copper breastplate and rings indicate a high degree of technology and could be related to some of the ancient Ohio smelting sites identified by William Conner.


          From: Karla Akins <kkakins@...>
          To: ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Saturday, August 17, 2013 12:37 AM
          Subject: Re: [ancient_waterways_society] Stone Mound along one of the canals of Ohio

           
          Fascinating.



          On Tue, Aug 13, 2013 at 1:55 PM, Ted Sojka <tedsojka@...> wrote:



          The Mound Builders by J.P. McLean 1879
          Licking County, Ohio

          Perhaps the largest and finest stone mound in Ohio was that which stood about eight miles south of Newark, and one mile east of the reservoir on the Licking Summit of the Ohio canal. It wasa composed of stones found onm the adjacent grounds, laid up, without cement, to the height of about fifty feet, with a circular base of one hundred and eighty-two feet if diameter. It was surrounded by a low embankment of an oval form, accompanied by a ditch, and having a gateway at the east end. When the reservoir, which is seven miles long, was made, in order to protect the east bank, so that it might be used for navigation, the stones from this mound were removed for that purpose. During the years 1831-32 not less than fifty teams were employed in hauling them, carrrying away from ten thousand to fifteen thousand wagon loads. Near the circumference of the base of the mound wewrediscovered fifteen or sixteen small earth mounds, and a similar one in the center. These small mounds were not examined until 1850, when two of them were opened by some of the neighboring farmers. In one were found human bones with some fluviatile shells, and in the other, two feet below a layer of hard, white fire clay, they came upon a trough, covered by small logs, and in it was found a human skeleton, around which appeared the impression of coarse cloth. With the skeleton were found fifteen copper rings and a breastplate or badge. The wood of the trough was in a good state of preservation, the clay over it being impervious to both air and water. The central mound was afterwards opened and found to contain a great many human bones, but no other relics of any note. All of these mounds, so far as they have been explored, contain earth from a distance- the fire clay having been brought from Flint Ridge, six or eight miles distant.



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