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Re: Sunstone Confirmed

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  • Susan
    The site where the divers found the crystal was not far fromthe shores of Isle Royale in Lake Superior. Too bad confiscateditems and anomalous artifacts are
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 6, 2013
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      The site where the  divers found the crystal was not far from
      the shores of Isle Royale  in Lake Superior.  Too bad confiscated
      items and anomalous artifacts are not placed in nearby
      museums awaiting further investigation. 

      --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Susan" <beldingenglish@...> wrote:
      >
      > Fifteen or twenty years ago at a People's Festival in Baraga,
      > MichiganAttended by a number of staff members and subscribers atAncient
      > American Magazine, two men from Lower Michiganreported that when diving
      > off their boat they found a very large, remarkably precision angled
      > crystal that they believed was used in ancient times for navigation.
      > Soon after they brought it and otheritems aboard, the Coast Guard
      > pulled up and confiscated all that they had found. I'd never heard of a
      > navigational crystal nor couldfind anything about it until I ran across
      > this article, similar to the one you posted, Terry, but clear. I wonder
      > what the Coast Guard does with confiscated articles?Probably
      > irretrievably archived like the Smithsonian and othershave tended to do,
      > and with no record of their finding nor existence.
      > http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/11/111111-vikings-sunstones\
      > -crystals-navigation-science/
      > Susan--- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "land_lubber"
      > aa376@ wrote:
      > > Science has confirmed the use of calcite crystals, also known as
      > > sunstones, in 16-th century ocean navigation (and presumably used much
      > > earlier also).
      > >
      > >
      > http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2013/03/scienceshot-sunstone-unear\
      > \
      > > thed-f.html?rss=1
      > >
      > <http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2013/03/scienceshot-sunstone-unea\
      > \
      > > rthed-f.html?rss=1>
      > >
      > > Terry
      > >
      >
    • Jeff
      Inasmuch as I am not well read when it come to the likes of Warren Dexter, Barry Fell, and other past and present figures in the diffusionist community, the
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 6, 2013
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        Inasmuch as I am not well read when it come to the likes of Warren Dexter, Barry Fell, and other past and present figures in the diffusionist community, the many threads of ideas circulating among various can get confounding for me. Partly for these reasons, and partly because I am involved in other causes, and am only able to make a limited commitment to such pursuits as archaeology, diffusionism, and prehistory, it is more practical for me to take more of a centrist position with regard to some of the most sensational theories circulating among diffusionists. Having stated as much, I, nevertheless, sympathize with the disappointment that some have expressed with regard to what seems to be the deliberate suppression of evidence that does not fit into the approved history, prehistory, or chronology dictated by profligately funded institutions, the likes of the Smithsonian--and by established academia. I believe that conflicting theories sometimes make
        the rational method of William of Ockham appropriate in order to narrow down incompatible possibilities (just as a hypothetical example, such as if, say, late diffusionist Alan Wilson, and Charles Maddox of the Kentucke Society, might propose conflicting theories regarding Bronze Age chronology).

        Considering Sue's heartbreaking account of the Coast Guard's arranging the disappearance of the beautiful and mysterious crystal found in some Michigan lake, the greater issue of artifact preservation seems to have arisen again here. With regard to this, notwithstanding the aforementioned concerns, I am somewhat encouraged by the formation of such groups as AAAPF, epigraphic societies, and NEARA. Also concerning this issue, without getting into the legal aspects--which I honestly am not qualified to comment on--I, meanwhile, look ahead with some hope toward future prospects of more widespread exposures of the atrocious conduct of many in the academic and scientific community--and even feel a bit of encouragement in the knowledge that those who approach alternative theories and diffusionist research with serious concerns for the history and pre-history of prior generations are now learning to be more resourceful in this area.

        Jeff Lewin


        ------------------------------
        On Wed, Mar 6, 2013 8:38 PM CST Susan wrote:

        >Fifteen or twenty years ago at a People's Festival in Baraga,
        >MichiganAttended by a number of staff members and subscribers atAncient
        >American Magazine, two men from Lower Michiganreported that when diving
        >off their boat they found a very large, remarkably precision angled
        >crystal that they believed was used in ancient times for navigation.
        >Soon after they brought it and otheritems aboard, the Coast Guard
        >pulled up and confiscated all that they had found. I'd never heard of a
        >navigational crystal nor couldfind anything about it until I ran across
        >this article, similar to the one you posted, Terry, but clear. I wonder
        >what the Coast Guard does with confiscated articles?Probably
        >irretrievably archived like the Smithsonian and othershave tended to do,
        >and with no record of their finding nor existence.
        >http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/11/111111-vikings-sunstones\
        >-crystals-navigation-science/
        >Susan--- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "land_lubber"
        ><aa376@...> wrote:
        >> Science has confirmed the use of calcite crystals, also known as
        >> sunstones, in 16-th century ocean navigation (and presumably used much
        >> earlier also).
        >>
        >>
        >http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2013/03/scienceshot-sunstone-unear\
        >\
        >> thed-f.html?rss=1
        >>
        ><http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2013/03/scienceshot-sunstone-unea\
        >\
        >> rthed-f.html?rss=1>
        >>
        >> Terry
        >>
        >
      • Karla Akins
        I had not been aware of a crystal for navigation and I have a written a chapter about the Vikings in my book O Canada, Her Story. But did you view the new
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 6, 2013
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          I had not been aware of a crystal for navigation and I have a written a chapter about the Vikings in my book O Canada, Her Story. But did you view the new series on the History channel -- VIKINGS? They used a navigation crystal in the first episode and I was flummoxed. I had never heard of it. And now you post this. Thanks so much for sharing this information. I wish I'd know of it sooner. But as I'm also researching for a different book (I'm writing 1820s fiction right now but plan on doing a Knight's Templar piece later), I will definitely be adding this to my files. Fascinating stuff.


          On Thu, Mar 7, 2013 at 12:26 AM, Jeff <quarefremeruntgentes7@...> wrote:
           


          Inasmuch as I am not well read when it come to the likes of Warren Dexter, Barry Fell, and other past and present figures in the diffusionist community, the many threads of ideas circulating among various can get confounding for me. Partly for these reasons, and partly because I am involved in other causes, and am only able to make a limited commitment to such pursuits as archaeology, diffusionism, and prehistory, it is more practical for me to take more of a centrist position with regard to some of the most sensational theories circulating among diffusionists. Having stated as much, I, nevertheless, sympathize with the disappointment that some have expressed with regard to what seems to be the deliberate suppression of evidence that does not fit into the approved history, prehistory, or chronology dictated by profligately funded institutions, the likes of the Smithsonian--and by established academia. I believe that conflicting theories sometimes make
          the rational method of William of Ockham appropriate in order to narrow down incompatible possibilities (just as a hypothetical example, such as if, say, late diffusionist Alan Wilson, and Charles Maddox of the Kentucke Society, might propose conflicting theories regarding Bronze Age chronology).

          Considering Sue's heartbreaking account of the Coast Guard's arranging the disappearance of the beautiful and mysterious crystal found in some Michigan lake, the greater issue of artifact preservation seems to have arisen again here. With regard to this, notwithstanding the aforementioned concerns, I am somewhat encouraged by the formation of such groups as AAAPF, epigraphic societies, and NEARA. Also concerning this issue, without getting into the legal aspects--which I honestly am not qualified to comment on--I, meanwhile, look ahead with some hope toward future prospects of more widespread exposures of the atrocious conduct of many in the academic and scientific community--and even feel a bit of encouragement in the knowledge that those who approach alternative theories and diffusionist research with serious concerns for the history and pre-history of prior generations are now learning to be more resourceful in this area.

          Jeff Lewin

          ------------------------------


          On Wed, Mar 6, 2013 8:38 PM CST Susan wrote:

          >Fifteen or twenty years ago at a People's Festival in Baraga,
          >MichiganAttended by a number of staff members and subscribers atAncient
          >American Magazine, two men from Lower Michiganreported that when diving
          >off their boat they found a very large, remarkably precision angled
          >crystal that they believed was used in ancient times for navigation.
          >Soon after they brought it and otheritems aboard, the Coast Guard
          >pulled up and confiscated all that they had found. I'd never heard of a
          >navigational crystal nor couldfind anything about it until I ran across
          >this article, similar to the one you posted, Terry, but clear. I wonder
          >what the Coast Guard does with confiscated articles?Probably
          >irretrievably archived like the Smithsonian and othershave tended to do,
          >and with no record of their finding nor existence.
          >http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/11/111111-vikings-sunstones\
          >-crystals-navigation-science/
          >Susan--- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "land_lubber"
          > wrote:
          >> Science has confirmed the use of calcite crystals, also known as
          >> sunstones, in 16-th century ocean navigation (and presumably used much
          >> earlier also).
          >>
          >>
          >http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2013/03/scienceshot-sunstone-unear\
          >\
          >> thed-f.html?rss=1
          >>
          >http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2013/03/scienceshot-sunstone-unea\
          >\
          >> rthed-f.html?rss=1>
          >>
          >> Terry
          >>
          >




          --
          Karla Akins

        • Ted Sojka
          There are areas that are off limits to collection by divers in the great lakes to preserve their history and the graves of those on board sunken ships. Divers
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 7, 2013
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            There are areas that are off limits to collection by divers in the great lakes to preserve their history and the graves of those on board sunken ships.   
            Divers use to collect coral from reefs along Florida's coast to see to tourist gift shops, but are now banned from doing that.  I don't think there is any attempt to hide history in this effort to protect a resource that can be viewed but not taken from.  
            ted
            On Mar 7, 2013, at 12:19 AM, Karla Akins wrote:

             

            I had not been aware of a crystal for navigation and I have a written a chapter about the Vikings in my book O Canada, Her Story. But did you view the new series on the History channel -- VIKINGS? They used a navigation crystal in the first episode and I was flummoxed. I had never heard of it. And now you post this. Thanks so much for sharing this information. I wish I'd know of it sooner. But as I'm also researching for a different book (I'm writing 1820s fiction right now but plan on doing a Knight's Templar piece later), I will definitely be adding this to my files. Fascinating stuff.


            On Thu, Mar 7, 2013 at 12:26 AM, Jeff <quarefremeruntgentes7@...> wrote:
             


            Inasmuch as I am not well read when it come to the likes of Warren Dexter, Barry Fell, and other past and present figures in the diffusionist community, the many threads of ideas circulating among various can get confounding for me. Partly for these reasons, and partly because I am involved in other causes, and am only able to make a limited commitment to such pursuits as archaeology, diffusionism, and prehistory, it is more practical for me to take more of a centrist position with regard to some of the most sensational theories circulating among diffusionists. Having stated as much, I, nevertheless, sympathize with the disappointment that some have expressed with regard to what seems to be the deliberate suppression of evidence that does not fit into the approved history, prehistory, or chronology dictated by profligately funded institutions, the likes of the Smithsonian--and by established academia. I believe that conflicting theories sometimes make
            the rational method of William of Ockham appropriate in order to narrow down incompatible possibilities (just as a hypothetical example, such as if, say, late diffusionist Alan Wilson, and Charles Maddox of the Kentucke Society, might propose conflicting theories regarding Bronze Age chronology).

            Considering Sue's heartbreaking account of the Coast Guard's arranging the disappearance of the beautiful and mysterious crystal found in some Michigan lake, the greater issue of artifact preservation seems to have arisen again here. With regard to this, notwithstanding the aforementioned concerns, I am somewhat encouraged by the formation of such groups as AAAPF, epigraphic societies, and NEARA. Also concerning this issue, without getting into the legal aspects--which I honestly am not qualified to comment on--I, meanwhile, look ahead with some hope toward future prospects of more widespread exposures of the atrocious conduct of many in the academic and scientific community--and even feel a bit of encouragement in the knowledge that those who approach alternative theories and diffusionist research with serious concerns for the history and pre-history of prior generations are now learning to be more resourceful in this area.

            Jeff Lewin

            ------------------------------


            On Wed, Mar 6, 2013 8:38 PM CST Susan wrote:

            >Fifteen or twenty years ago at a People's Festival in Baraga,
            >MichiganAttended by a number of staff members and subscribers atAncient
            >American Magazine, two men from Lower Michiganreported that when diving
            >off their boat they found a very large, remarkably precision angled
            >crystal that they believed was used in ancient times for navigation.
            >Soon after they brought it and otheritems aboard, the Coast Guard
            >pulled up and confiscated all that they had found. I'd never heard of a
            >navigational crystal nor couldfind anything about it until I ran across
            >this article, similar to the one you posted, Terry, but clear. I wonder
            >what the Coast Guard does with confiscated articles?Probably
            >irretrievably archived like the Smithsonian and othershave tended to do,
            >and with no record of their finding nor existence.
            >http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/11/111111-vikings-sunstones\
            >-crystals-navigation-science/
            >Susan--- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "land_lubber"
            > wrote:
            >> Science has confirmed the use of calcite crystals, also known as
            >> sunstones, in 16-th century ocean navigation (and presumably used much
            >> earlier also).
            >>
            >>
            >http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2013/03/scienceshot-sunstone-unear\
            >\
            >> thed-f.html?rss=1
            >>
            >http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2013/03/scienceshot-sunstone-unea\
            >\
            >> rthed-f.html?rss=1>
            >>
            >> Terry
            >>
            >





            --
            Karla Akins



          • C TRAYLOR
            Re Coast Guard confiscation of what they see as a rock; did they replace it in the water, or did they sail away with it? In either case, it must have been
            Message 5 of 7 , Mar 8, 2013
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              Re Coast Guard confiscation of what they see as a "rock;" did they replace it in the water, or did they sail away with it?  In either case, it must have been entered into the log. Some person in that area might accept the challenge to answer these questions ....
               
              Cal  Traylor
               ======================= 

              --
                   N  
               

               

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