Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [ancient_waterways_society] Re: Medieval Norse in the Canadian Arctic

Expand Messages
  • Ted Sojka
    Hello Patricia, I am one of the moderators of the site and want you to know that this is not a peer review group. Most of us are amateurs and not qualified
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 13, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello Patricia,

      I am one of the moderators of the site and want you to know that this is not a peer review group.   Most of us are amateurs and not qualified to judge your work.  I find it very interesting and I also remember that 25 years ago the expert at the Smithsonian, saying that Folsum was first, doing great scientific experiments with the atl-atl.  The paradigm has changed and so has the opinion of the lithic expert after much study and examination of materials.  I always admired Dennis Stanford and his work and now that he has updated his work due to new evidence it shows the scientific method is working, but a little slower than some would like.  The Solutrian 

      I was happy to share your finds with other members of the group and that any fibers still remained at the site and were in good enough condition to tell so much about how they were made.  It reminded me of several burials found in  a swamp in Florida that were featured in National Geographic which contained ancient fibers that had been woven.  As an art educator this was very meaningful to me and showed that new discoveries update early ones.   

      Thank you for sharing your work with us and hope you continue to explore this ancient past.  
      Ted Sojka

      On Dec 13, 2012, at 4:03 PM, land_lubber wrote:

       

      New World Vikings

      http://www2.macleans.ca/2012/11/20/a-twist-in-time/

      I appreciate Maclean's interest in my archaeological project related to a Norse presence in Arctic Canada ("A twist in time," National, Nov. 26). However, the quoted comments from William Fitzhugh, of the Smithsonian Institution's Arctic studies centre, are both inaccurate and unfair in taking me to task for relying on insufficient evidence and in not publishing "responsibly" in the scientific literature. I have published on this subject as early as 2000, and in a 2006 conference paper presented evidence that these early dates were partly the result of chemical contamination. It should not be surprising that we have found new evidence of a Norse presence in the eastern Arctic, given the fact that a small nation of seafarers and hunters existed for over four centuries in Greenland, only two days' sail from Baffin Island. Yet the topic of New World "Vikings" seems to not only generate automatic controversy among archaeologists, but to bring out their most competitive instincts.

      Patricia Sutherland, University of Aberdeen, Scotland
      http://www2.macleans.ca/2012/12/12/letters-10/



    • William Conner
      The intransigence of professional archaeologists on the subject of pre-Columbian Old World contact with North America is a tired and worn out story here in the
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 14, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        The intransigence of professional archaeologists on the subject of pre-Columbian Old World contact with North America is a tired and worn out story here in the USA.  If you desire some fresh air about North American archaeology, I urge you to obtain a copy of "Iron Age America: Before Columbus."  I am the author.  It is available from online book stores.
         
        William Conner, Columbus, Ohio USA
      • C TRAYLOR
        -- As for Viking presence in the Americas, I suggest we have hardly started that history. One of my pet subjects is Chincoteague Pony. My thesis is that pony
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 18, 2012
        • 0 Attachment

          --
           As for Viking presence in the Americas, I suggest we have hardly started that history.  One of my pet subjects is Chincoteague Pony. My thesis is that pony has a Viking heritage.  
           
          As for Viking travel to the Americas, it may have been easier than we assume.  While flying from UK to Boston area, one trip I was awed by the number of ice bergs. That made me wonder if the Vikings took advantage of these bergs as over-night rest stops? 
           
          Cal Traylor  
           
            ==========================      
           

           


        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.