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Re: ....discovering Lewis and Clark

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  • Ted Sojka
    They have been doing this rock cutting and thievery for years in the Southwest, and I am sure there are a lot of rich people with this stolen art built into
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 21, 2012
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      They have been doing this rock cutting and thievery for years in the Southwest, and I am sure there are a lot of rich people with this stolen art built into their fireplaces around the country.  

      Would we stand by for someone who digs up a cemetery for artifacts, wedding rings, and other cultural objects?  I will never understand why people would want to possess such things?

      The Nazis stole art all over Europe and hid it in a salt mine.   General Eisenhower visited the cave and did his best to get most of it back to where it belonged, though the effort is still going on.   

      Have a great turkey day and if you are first nation people, it may be a different kind of remembrance day.   

      If you have never seen the work of Charles M. Russell, look him up on line and see if you can find the painting he did called, "Indians, Discovering Lewis and Clark".

      Ted


      On Nov 21, 2012, at 8:38 PM, kbs2244 wrote:

       

      I guess the good thing is that there must be a market for these things.

      Guys that like it but, for whatever reason, cannot take a trip out into Death Vally.

      Still, a real shame.


    • william smith
      Hi Ted   Very good post on stolen artifacts. This type of greed makes it very hard for true researchers. It makes it very difficult to go public with
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 22, 2012
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        Hi Ted
          Very good post on stolen artifacts. This type of greed makes it very hard for true researchers. It makes it very difficult to go public with locations of new finds because of the lack of academic research at these locations before they are contaminated. Two years ago I spent a week in the field with researchers looking at triangle holes in stone called mooring stones. We collected all the factual information we could, however in all cases the holes had been visited by others who did more damage than research. A good example of lost information is at the Heavener rune stone in Oklahoma. I have heard of at least 3 rune stones found near the Heavener stone and an ancient bronze ax. Just this last Wed. at a small flee market in Indiana a vendor was selling Native American artifacts which looked of museum quality. He had Oklahoma arrow heads mixed with Midwest as well as some fakes.

        --- On Wed, 11/21/12, Ted Sojka <tedsojka@...> wrote:

        From: Ted Sojka <tedsojka@...>
        Subject: [ancient_waterways_society] Re: ....discovering Lewis and Clark
        To: ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, November 21, 2012, 10:56 PM

         
        They have been doing this rock cutting and thievery for years in the Southwest, and I am sure there are a lot of rich people with this stolen art built into their fireplaces around the country.  

        Would we stand by for someone who digs up a cemetery for artifacts, wedding rings, and other cultural objects?  I will never understand why people would want to possess such things?

        The Nazis stole art all over Europe and hid it in a salt mine.   General Eisenhower visited the cave and did his best to get most of it back to where it belonged, though the effort is still going on.   

        Have a great turkey day and if you are first nation people, it may be a different kind of remembrance day.   

        If you have never seen the work of Charles M. Russell, look him up on line and see if you can find the painting he did called, "Indians, Discovering Lewis and Clark".

        Ted


        On Nov 21, 2012, at 8:38 PM, kbs2244 wrote:

         
        I guess the good thing is that there must be a market for these things.

        Guys that like it but, for whatever reason, cannot take a trip out into Death Vally.

        Still, a real shame.


      • Ted Sojka
        Once a year a local archeologist would have a ID day for artifacts people find on their farms at the area Mall. Collectors came to exhibit their stuff, in a
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 22, 2012
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          Once a year a local archeologist would have a ID day for artifacts people find on their farms at the area Mall.  Collectors came to exhibit their stuff, in a great education theme day.   This was a better format than just selling and trading stuff from pot hunteres and collectors of grave goods.   We had a local collecter pass away who had been collecting since the 1930's and at his sale at our fairground, most of the items left the county and went all over the country.  He had given the local college first pick at anything they wanted and sold them a lot of Oneota pottery pieces he had found surface hunting over the years.  It helped make a stratigrahpy to date this shell tempered and grit tempered ceramic ware.

          I was out of town when the sale occured but had volunteered to transport pieces to the college prior to that date.   Our site contains links to Marburg 72, a photobucket page done my Vince Barrow, one of the moderators.  Lots of information from many places, museums, and collections.  All of them available for anyone to use and share.  Try out this collecting process of information rather than just keeping the artifacts in a drawer or box on a shelf.

          ted
          PS Thanks to Vince also, who is busy raising a child and tending to family along with his job.  



           
          On Nov 22, 2012, at 9:56 AM, william smith wrote:

           

          Hi Ted
            Very good post on stolen artifacts. This type of greed makes it very hard for true researchers. It makes it very difficult to go public with locations of new finds because of the lack of academic research at these locations before they are contaminated. Two years ago I spent a week in the field with researchers looking at triangle holes in stone called mooring stones. We collected all the factual information we could, however in all cases the holes had been visited by others who did more damage than research. A good example of lost information is at the Heavener rune stone in Oklahoma. I have heard of at least 3 rune stones found near the Heavener stone and an ancient bronze ax. Just this last Wed. at a small flee market in Indiana a vendor was selling Native American artifacts which looked of museum quality. He had Oklahoma arrow heads mixed with Midwest as well as some fakes.

          --- On Wed, 11/21/12, Ted Sojka <tedsojka@...> wrote:

          From: Ted Sojka <tedsojka@...>
          Subject: [ancient_waterways_society] Re: ....discovering Lewis and Clark
          To: ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Wednesday, November 21, 2012, 10:56 PM

           
          They have been doing this rock cutting and thievery for years in the Southwest, and I am sure there are a lot of rich people with this stolen art built into their fireplaces around the country.  

          Would we stand by for someone who digs up a cemetery for artifacts, wedding rings, and other cultural objects?  I will never understand why people would want to possess such things?

          The Nazis stole art all over Europe and hid it in a salt mine.   General Eisenhower visited the cave and did his best to get most of it back to where it belonged, though the effort is still going on.   

          Have a great turkey day and if you are first nation people, it may be a different kind of remembrance day.   

          If you have never seen the work of Charles M. Russell, look him up on line and see if you can find the painting he did called, "Indians, Discovering Lewis and Clark".

          Ted


          On Nov 21, 2012, at 8:38 PM, kbs2244 wrote:

           
          I guess the good thing is that there must be a market for these things.

          Guys that like it but, for whatever reason, cannot take a trip out into Death Vally.

          Still, a real shame.



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