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Re: Inferences from archeology

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  • james m clark jr
    Hey Frank, AWS, The following is based on theory, historical place names and perhaps personal chronology. According to an out of print British Israelite
    Message 1 of 14 , Feb 11, 2012
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      Hey Frank, AWS,

      The following is based on theory, historical place names and perhaps
      personal chronology.

      According to an out of print British Israelite publications map with
      migrations of the Frisians seems to imply an early link to the more eastern regions of the Beth-Sac Khumri although the European route isn't suggested by way of Crete, Macedonia through Veneta but rather an alternative route right through Italy. Ironically the Frisians aren't listed among Sac names in the central region [Saka,Sacki Sacksen] of Europe but further north are the Warni and Franks to the south of them.

      As of 16 June 2011 Scandinavian origins seem to present a problem for the Warini at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Warini


      6 "East Anglian sources called the inhabitants of 'Frisia' Warnii instead of Frisians."

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frisia#cite_note-5

      My grandmothers maiden name is Warren and they claim to be German although the genealogical records are in French.

      be well,
      jamey












      --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Frank" <frankroskind@...> wrote:
      >
      > Frisians were definitely western Europeans:
      > http://www.euratlas.net/history/europe/600/index.html
      > http://www.euratlas.net/history/europe/700/index.html
      > http://www.euratlas.net/history/europe/700/entity_1281.html
      > http://www.raremaps.com/gallery/detail/19179/Frisia_Occidentalis/Ortelius.html
      > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnus_Forteman
      >
      > What is interesting is the possibility that Frisian culture had a meaningful impact on attitudes in the British Isles, especially as so-called Flemish archers seem to have accompanied most conquests within the isles, including the Battle of Hastings, the Strongbow "invasion" of Wales, and later Ireland, and some battles in Scotland. The area most settled by their descendants in Ireland, Wexford, seems to have played a large role in the uprisings in 1640 and 1798.
      >
      > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "james m clark jr" <jameyboy@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Just as there are no Viking today Frysians are not Eurasian or Asian?
      > >
      > > http://www.pbs.org/wnet/secrets/previous_seasons/case_amazon/clues.html
      > > <http://www.pbs.org/wnet/secrets/previous_seasons/case_amazon/clues.html\
      > > >
      > >
      > > "The Baltic Sea to the Aegean Sea from Travemunde, Germany up the Rhine
      > > River and down the Danube River to the Black Sea, thru the
      > > Bosporus to Istanbul, and then thru the Dardanelles to the Aegean Sea
      > > aboard..." not sure if this is a quote or not- it's on some tourist
      > > site.
      > >
      > >
      > > "Travemünde is a borough of Lübeck, Germany, located at the mouth
      > > of the river Trave in Lübeck Bay. It began life as a fortress built
      > > by Henry the Lion, Duke of Saxony, in the 12th century to guard the
      > > mouth of the Trave, and the Danes subsequently strengthened it. It
      > > became a town in 1317 and in 1329 passed into the possession of the free
      > > city of Lübeck, to which it has since belonged."
      > >
      > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Travem%C3%BCnde
      > > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Travem%C3%BCnde>
      > >
      > >
      > > There is actually a simular saying or question but it seems to begin in
      > > Egypt. To be honest I don't recall ever having mentioned this since
      > > 1999 but I could be wrong.
      > >
      > > be well,
      > > jamey
      > >
      > >
      > > Sailing From the Black Sea to the Baltic?!
      > >
      > > We see Gathelus reaching the BALTIC SEA from the NORTHERN AEGEAN SEA by
      > > way of THE STRAIGHT LEADING INTO THE NORTHERN OCEAN (BALTIC SEA). How
      > > could this be? Ancient geographers reveal that at one time THE CONTINENT
      > > OF EUROPE WAS SEPARATED FROM ASIA BY THE SEA!
      > >
      > > Notice what author S. Gusten Olson says: "At this point, one VERY
      > > SIGNIFICANT topographical factor must be taken into consideration. From
      > > the time the Phoenicians were the chief mariners until our time,
      > > DEFINITE CHANGES HAVE TAKEN PLACE IN THE LAND SURFACE OF EUROPE. It was
      > > initially a residual effect-extending shorelines, diminishing lakes and
      > > DISAPPEARING WATERWAYS." ("The Incredible Nordic Origins." Nordica S.F.
      > > Ltd., Kent, England. 1981. P.57).
      > >
      > > When discussing the amber trade of ancient times, Olson notes that
      > > "there is evidence that it [the amber] WAS TRANSPORTED FROM THE REGIONS
      > > OF THE NORTH SEA AND THE BALTIC TO THE AEGEAN SEA. One route traversed
      > > through Denmark and Germany, finally reaching the ports of the
      > > NORTH-CENTRAL MEDITERRANEAN....In earlier times than has previously been
      > > realized, THE NORTH OF EUROPE has been CONNECTED BY WATERWAYS.... Thus
      > > it was possible for merchandise to regularly have been shipped FROM THE
      > > BALTIC TO THE LEVANT [the eastern land region of the Mediterranean Sea--
      > > particularly Syria, Lebanon, and Israel] AND EGYPT!" (Ibid, p.57).
      > >
      > > Modern scholars ridicule this idea, but the evidence abounds in the
      > > geographical features of eastern Europe. If you look at a detailed map
      > > of eastern Europe you will notice vast areas of MARSHLAND in a line from
      > > the Baltic Sea to the Black Sea -- from DAN-ZIG at the mouth of the
      > > VISTULA RIVER to ODESSA at the mouth of the DNIESTER. Also, the area
      > > southeast of DANZIG is peppered with small lakes indicating the area, at
      > > one time, was under water.
      > >
      > > The "Encyclopedia Britannica" comments on these MARSHLANDS:
      > >
      > > The PEIPUS REGION on the Estonian-Latvian borders of Russia...abounds in
      > > MARSH related to the distribution of boulder clay while FURTHER SOUTH
      > > are the PRIPET MARSHES. Here the VISTULA-DNIEPER LOW-ZONE north-east of
      > > the Carpathians crosses the European plain, and the PRIPET MARSHES are
      > > the north-west part of the Dnieper basin towards the indefinite boundary
      > > between the DRAINAGE SYSTEMS OF THE BLACK SEA AND THE BALTIC. These
      > > great areas of marsh have had great influence in ISOLATING CENTRAL
      > > RUSSIA, ESPECIALLY FROM THE WEST, and they determine to a large extent
      > > the HISTORIC WAYS OF COMMUNICATION from the west into Russia, that of
      > > Vilna-Smolensk north of, and that of Lemberg-Kiev south of the Pripet
      > > marshes. -- 1943 edition. Vol. 8, p.831.
      > >
      > > At the time of the Exodus the area from the Black Sea to the Baltic was
      > > under water and deep enough to allow the shipping of the day to pass
      > > through. Gathelus, therefore, traveled from Irena to the island of
      > > Gothia by passing into the Black Sea through the DARDANELLES, then to
      > > the Baltic by way of the "straight leading into the NORTHERN OCEAN."
      > >
      > > http://www.biblemysteries.com/library/liafail.htm
      > > <http://www.biblemysteries.com/library/liafail.htm>
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Frank"
      > > <frankroskind@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > I was thinking more about validating archeology with testable
      > > hypotheses. I was also thinking about using our knowledge to predict
      > > where to find new archeological discoveries. Obviously drawing
      > > inferences based on preconceived notions is not so great either. The
      > > investigator who is sure that Finns, Koreans and Croatans are the same
      > > lost tribe of Israel is likely to find confirmatory evidence in many
      > > archeological finds. I prefer the investigator who says the Frisians
      > > were like the Vikings so we should find evidence of Frisian settlement
      > > on the same waterways we find evidence of Viking settlement. That
      > > investigator then looks where water levels would have created coastlines
      > > in the days of Frisia Magnus, on islands known to have been explored by
      > > Vikings. When he or she finds compelling evidence of Frisian settlement,
      > > the theory has been supported.
      > > > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, Vincent Barrows
      > > v_barrows@ wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > The "Ladder of inference" should be considered:
      > > > > For example, see the following link:
      > > > >
      > > http://www.jadcommunications.com/yvonnefbrown/files/The%20Ladder%20of%20\
      > > Inference.pdf
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
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