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Re: ojibwe.org

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  • james m clark jr
    Hey Martin, AWS, That seems to be an observant prespective that would otherwise seem nearly impossible to have beem overlook perhaps by other authors on
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 25, 2012
      Hey Martin, AWS,

      That seems to be an observant prespective that would otherwise seem nearly impossible to have beem overlook perhaps by other authors on Indigenious peoples; especially the Iroquois and the relationship with the Cherokee Nation. I admit that it has been for me in times past, had, and still has been, rather difficult as even up to now to distinguish various links of what little I have tried to graps at times among customs and tellings of the Elders. Trying to absorb the Southeasten perspective of the Cheorkee often seems to have made me disregard those in the west or north as it didn't seem to help much later prefering Indigenious authors as oppossed to either older books with more of a colonialist vibe or what most would consider a modern norm.

      I had considered deleting message #2675 at AWS and adding it to this thread regarding some of the statments and formerly finding myself at a dead end since 2007. However, it is online already which may serve more as a note to self that overall even the following perhaps should be regarded as among the Inca and that I am not as knowedgable of the Huron confederacy families as I would like to be.

      Until now, I have not considered the Wari being connected to the Huron confederacy families but had perhaps been consistant in this error reguarding the Huari Empire as well.

      Who Was Who in the Huari Empire*
      Institute of Andean Studies 33rd annual meeting, January 8-9,
      1993, UC-Berkeley © Patricia Knobloch, 1993
      http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/~bharley/WWWIAS93Paper.html

      At any rate, Huari Titu Capac listed as the 83 ruler in A.D. 225 in precolumbian/preIncan times toward the end of the "true Florescent Era" according to Dr. Hoeh, although links about 9 eras perviously in the same list lists before this era, makes mention of a Burmese Arakan people before the Cultist era at the time of [39.] Capac Raymi Amauta -- 1000 bce- others had also migrated to the Russian Steppes.

      37. Tchinchi Roca Amauta 20 1040
      38. Tupac Amaru Amauta 25 1020
      39. Capac Raymi Amauta -- 1000

      The late Dr. Hoeh reguarding Capac Raymi Amauta:

      This ruler instituted certain festivals in his name. He is parallel
      with the time of Odin I of Denmark and of Solomon. He was the
      mainspring behind the development of what archaeologists call the
      Cultist Era. This Era is illustrative of the contact between Old and
      New World during certain significant ages. (Hoeh 1963).

      40. IllJa Tupac 3 --
      --
      41. Tupac Amauta 3 990
      42. Huanacauri I 4 --

      be well,
      jamey

      --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "martincarriere@..." <martincarriere@...> wrote:
      >
      > In their own tellings the Iroquois did not hold a memory of snow until after they had travelled north. They had no traditions of winter clothing, snow shoes or how to function outdoors in the snow. They basically remained snowbound in their lodgings till the spring. It is our understanding that the northern territories were occupied by the Huron confederacy families at that time not the Ojibwa.
      >
      > Best,
      > Martin Carriere
      >
      >
      > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, Larry Hancock <hancocklarry40@> wrote:
      > >
      > > While I do not have the reference any longer, years ago I read somewhere that the Iriquois winter count recorded that they migrated from somewhere south all the way up into Canada then were forced back to New York state, driving a wedge between the Objibwa and more eastern Algonquian peoples. I also read that the Objibwa language is more closely related to the Algonkian languages of Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine on East than to Algonkian languages farther south. 
      > >
      > > --- On Mon, 1/9/12, Vincent Barrows <v_barrows@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > From: Vincent Barrows <v_barrows@>
      > > Subject: Re: [ancient_waterways_society] ojibwe.org
      > > To: ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com
      > > Date: Monday, January 9, 2012, 11:14 PM
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >  
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      > > In 1570, the Mohawk, Seneca, Onondaga, Oneida, and Cayuga formed a confederacy called the League of the Iroquois. This governing body was made up of 50 members whose task was to confer about problems with outside tribes.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > From: quarefremeruntgentes7@ <quarefremeruntgentes7@>;
      > > To: <ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com>;
      > > Subject: Re: [ancient_waterways_society] ojibwe.org
      > > Sent: Mon, Jan 9, 2012 4:23:56 AM
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Did the Iroquois always occupy the New York / Pennsylvania region, or did they migrate there from further South at some point in time?
      > >
      > > While I appreciate this information, I find myself attempting to remember Native histories and prehistories that I studied at Rutgers 25 years ago. Presumably, the Lene Lenape covered more territory than just the Delaware Valley prior to the onset of hostilities between them and the Iroquois.
      > >
      > > Jeff
      > >
      > > Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T
      > >
      > > -----Original Message-----
      > > From: "Vince" <v_barrows@>
      > > Sender: ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com
      > > Date: Tue, 13 Dec 2011 18:45:28
      > > To: <ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com>
      > > Reply-To: ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com
      > > Subject: [ancient_waterways_society] ojibwe.org
      > >
      > > The Lenni Lenapi are identified as the ancient ancestors of the Ojibwe and the Wallum Olum is identified as the oldest written record in North America by the Lenni Lenapi which dates back prior to 1600 BC, according to 2002 PBS documentary and companion book, Ojibwe Waasa Inaabidaa.
      > >
      > > The Ojibwe published the Waasa Inaabidaa in 2002. It is a six part PBS series which won five (5) emmy awards. The Companion Book Ojibwe: Waasa Inaabidaa, We look in all directions is an outstanding example of First Nations history from the Native perspective. Thomas Peacock is an Ojibwe educator and writer from Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe. He is also an associate professor of education at the University of Minnesota Duluth. This book is a personal history as well as a Nation's history told in a well-documented and informative style. The chapters begin with the author's personal anecdotes that relate to the topic. The first chapter is Ojibwemowin: Ojibwe Oral Tradition and it describes the importance of language, the oral tradition, storytelling, and the story of creation. The author relies on the Delaware Nation's Wallum Olum as a key source for Ojibwe history and origins. http://www.ojibwe.org/ The sources detail the Red Score/ Wallum Olum.
      > > This source has been reverted for the third time on the Walam Olum page. However, the Wallum Olum is specifically attributed to the Ojibwe Ancestors (Lenni Lenape) in these sources.
      > >
      > > Suggest looking at the overview description about the Ojibwe documentatary here http://www.ojibwe.org/home/overview_description.html It should be sourced to show that "PBS Waasa Inaabidaa…We Look In All Directions is a six-part television documentary series produced by WDSE in Duluth, Minn., about the second largest tribe in North America, the Anishinaabe/Ojibwe (Chippewa) nation of the upper Great Lakes region. The series includes more than one hundred (100) interviews with tribal elders, historians, youth and leaders from the ninteen (19) Ojibwe bands in Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota. These interviews, along with 3,000 archival photographs, interviews with academic historians, original and historic artwork, and dramatic re-enactments, illustrate the Ojibwe people, culture and language through the past two centuries."... As stated in the Waasa Inaabidaa, the Lenni Lenape were the ancient ancestors of the Ojibwe. "An Epic Story of migration, known
      > > as the Wallum Olum, Was told by our ancient ancestors, the Lenni Lenape."
      > >
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      > > ------------------------------------
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      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
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      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
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