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Re: ojibwe.org

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  • james m clark jr
    Hey Susan, AWS, Hard drives are alot more reasonable; besideds the viruses may not have effeted the regeistry. So if you haven t trashed your PC keep [in
    Message 1 of 13 , Jan 22, 2012
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      Hey Susan, AWS,

      Hard drives are alot more reasonable; besideds the viruses may not have effeted the regeistry. So if you haven't trashed your PC keep [in which I couldn't afford to] the Hard drive it can be eventually formated and vital partition information such as personal regersted program inform can still be recoverd by someone who knows how. Text such as ebooks, or pdf's may be few in number... photos & programs and music are abundant.

      I am sure there are students at UM that would be glad to help and willing to take the risk as it is simular to jump starting a car with a battery that isn't recommended so that it mimics more like an external hardrive to safeguard the viral version of window from loading up as the primary drive.

      Did this with a backup drive which is a no no and found only 1 of 3 Divine Vermont pdf's from Larry in which I am going to compress and see if it's small enough to add in AWS files if possible.... it's the reason why I haven't yet deleted the folder in AWS "Files" section at the site in case some are still wondering why I haven't removed it.

      be well,
      jamey

      --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Susan" <beldingenglish@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Much appreciation, Ted for the offer that someone send me a computer --- on loan or otherwise --- but i declined one for a reasonable cost last fall. Mostly because of my ineptitude  the past two years losing two computers to viruses,  despite good anti-viral software. PC's are too costly to maintain and i dont want to crash another.  I have been doing well with an iPhone and library computers.   And just received an iPad from my children for Christmas, which I understand is less susceptible to viruses. 
      >
      > My gratitude also to member Larry J. In Madison, Wisconsin for his many hours trying to revamp my last laptop;  he also did not cash my checks for his professional services.  
      >
      > Ted, thanks for submitting another of your fine drawings in your reply to the excellent series of posts from the membership that have been forthcoming. To all here ... So many within this highly diplomatic membership have been so astute at moderating, supporting, 'co-hosting' each other here that the host/co-hosts have little to do other than follow posts and, as host MinnesotaStan posted not long ago, perform an occasional tweak here and there. As occurred this week when a couple of you inadvertently sent duplicate posts. 
      >
      > I learn much from this association --- likely many scientific and cultural teachings not yet found in texts and classrooms.  Especially when i was quite ill for a time, i was particularly warmed by the personal and cordial sharings of diverse backgrounds, experiences, and opinions here. Your doing all of the above makes my own co-hosting specialty an easy one-- that of greeting newcomers, encouraging members to directly post upcoming events related to this group. And asking you to keep us current about your research, papers, books, media presentations, etc.  i believe that within groups operating as ours oftentimes does, the shared work of one or more here potentially can effect all interested members and onlookers here.  Synergically.
      >
      > Anyway, my new iPad should work well enough to carry forth my co-hosting duties. One day I will get hold of a PC enough hours in order to resurrect the AWS newcomer welcoming newsletter. Last year it became so filled with members' links and data that it would not submit. 
      >
      > I may not know first names of some of you posting, or even general localities of most members' nearby 'ancient waterways'.  But my appreciation goes out to each here for your helpful, insightful posts  to our global and diverse membership.  
      >
      > Susan 
      >
      > Sent from my iPad
      > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, Ted Sojka <tedsojka@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Never get in a hurry to send a message.
      > >
      > > Begin forwarded message:
      > >
      > > From: Ted Sojka <tedsojka@>
      > > Date: January 11, 2012 9:37:13 PM CST
      > > To: ted sojka <tedsojka@>
      > > Subject: Fwd: [ancient_waterways_society] Re: ojibwe.org
      > >
      > >
      > > I am sure glad for the information you all have sent to Jeff.
      > >
      > > Jeff, it is very good to learn from all these great people on line.
      > >
      > > I have sent a few comments to him as not to bore you all with my wit
      > > and wisdom, or lack of it!
      > >
      > > I think traditional education might have a leg up when an entire
      > > community was devoted to teaching children history, myth, and legend.
      > > Much cheaper than sending all the youngsters off to school and college?
      > >
      > >
      > > For those in the dominant society who think we do not have myths,
      > > think of Washington's cherry tree, or Daniel Boone and the killing of
      > > the bear when he was only three? Washington crossing the Deleware is
      > > now in a new version without the stars and stripes and the rowboat.
      > > That flag was not produced until a year after the crossing at Valley
      > > Forge. He actually rode a ferry type barge rather than the row boat
      > > in our common memory from the artist painting. By the way that
      > > painting in the Metropolitan in New York is the size of a billboard
      > > and very impressive. A guard there once showed me that all the people
      > > in the picture were the same model as the artist could not afford more
      > > than one when he did the painting. The same guy with hair, no hair,
      > > hat, etc. I laughed and did enjoy what the fellow had learned from
      > > another docent.
      > >
      > >
      > > Gathering fish in the spring floods on the Oneota River, by Ted Sojka
      > >
      > > Does someone out there have a spare computer to send to Susan, our
      > > ailing moderator who has recovered from her surgery, but did tell me
      > > that her computer did not survive!
      > >
      > > ted
      > > PS
      > > Someone please educate us all on the Chippewa and Ojibway.
      > >
      > > Some locals here were moved to land in between the Sioux and Ojibway
      > > at Long Prairie, Minnesota around 1850. They had to fight both for a
      > > while. Coming Thunder, pictured below, was one of these fellows. An
      > > insult added to injury, as he and his followers were first put into a
      > > DMZ in between the Sac and Fox and the Sioux of Wabasha's band. They
      > > had been enemies of both for years.
      > >
      > >
      > > Coming Thunder, photographed at Fort Snelling where he was being held
      > > in "protective custody" , during the 1862 Sioux uprising. He wears
      > > the peace medal given out at the treaty of 1825.
      > >
      > > There was an artist present at this treaty and this may be a portrait
      > > painted at that time at Fort Crawford at Prarie du Chien.
      > > Thanks to Professor David Faldet who wrote a book called "Oneota Flow"
      > > and
      > > has taken the time to know many of the descendants of this Ho Chunk
      > > leader.
      > > >>
      > > >> .
      > > >> On Jan 11, 2012, at 2:06 PM, martincarriere@ wrote:
      > > >>
      > > >>> In their own tellings the Iroquois did not hold a memory of snow
      > > >>> until after they had travelled north. They had no traditions of
      > > >>> winter clothing, snow shoes or how to function outdoors in the
      > > >>> snow. They basically remained snowbound in their lodgings till the
      > > >>> spring. It is our understanding that the northern territories were
      > > >>> occupied by the Huron confederacy families at that time not the
      > > >>> Ojibwa.
      > > >>>
      > > >>> Best,
      > > >>> Martin Carriere
      > > >>>
      > > >>> --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, Larry Hancock
      > > >>> <hancocklarry40@> wrote:
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> > While I do not have the reference any longer, years ago I read
      > > >>> somewhere that the Iriquois winter count recorded that they
      > > >>> migrated from somewhere south all the way up into Canada then were
      > > >>> forced back to New York state, driving a wedge between the
      > > >>> Objibwa and more eastern Algonquian peoples. I also read that the
      > > >>> Objibwa language is more closely related to the Algonkian
      > > >>> languages of Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine on East than toÂ
      > > >>> Algonkian languages farther south.Â
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> > --- On Mon, 1/9/12, Vincent Barrows <v_barrows@> wrote:
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> > From: Vincent Barrows <v_barrows@>
      > > >>> > Subject: Re: [ancient_waterways_society] ojibwe.org
      > > >>> > To: ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com
      > > >>> > Date: Monday, January 9, 2012, 11:14 PM
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> > Â
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> > In 1570, the Mohawk, Seneca, Onondaga, Oneida, and Cayuga formed
      > > >>> a confederacy called the League of the Iroquois. This governing
      > > >>> body was made up of 50 members whose task was to confer about
      > > >>> problems with outside tribes.
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> > From: quarefremeruntgentes7@ <quarefremeruntgentes7@>;
      > > >>> > To: <ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com>;
      > > >>> > Subject: Re: [ancient_waterways_society] ojibwe.org
      > > >>> > Sent: Mon, Jan 9, 2012 4:23:56 AM
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> > Did the Iroquois always occupy the New York / Pennsylvania
      > > >>> region, or did they migrate there from further South at some point
      > > >>> in time?
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> > While I appreciate this information, I find myself attempting to
      > > >>> remember Native histories and prehistories that I studied at
      > > >>> Rutgers 25 years ago. Presumably, the Lene Lenape covered more
      > > >>> territory than just the Delaware Valley prior to the onset of
      > > >>> hostilities between them and the Iroquois.
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> > Jeff
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> > Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> > -----Original Message-----
      > > >>> > From: "Vince" <v_barrows@>
      > > >>> > Sender: ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com
      > > >>> > Date: Tue, 13 Dec 2011 18:45:28
      > > >>> > To: <ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com>
      > > >>> > Reply-To: ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com
      > > >>> > Subject: [ancient_waterways_society] ojibwe.org
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> > The Lenni Lenapi are identified as the ancient ancestors of the
      > > >>> Ojibwe and the Wallum Olum is identified as the oldest written
      > > >>> record in North America by the Lenni Lenapi which dates back prior
      > > >>> to 1600 BC, according to 2002 PBS documentary and companion book,
      > > >>> Ojibwe Waasa Inaabidaa.
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> > The Ojibwe published the Waasa Inaabidaa in 2002. It is a six
      > > >>> part PBS series which won five (5) emmy awards. The Companion Book
      > > >>> Ojibwe: Waasa Inaabidaa, We look in all directions is an
      > > >>> outstanding example of First Nations history from the Native
      > > >>> perspective. Thomas Peacock is an Ojibwe educator and writer from
      > > >>> Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe. He is also an associate
      > > >>> professor of education at the University of Minnesota Duluth. This
      > > >>> book is a personal history as well as a Nation's history told in a
      > > >>> well-documented and informative style. The chapters begin with the
      > > >>> author's personal anecdotes that relate to the topic. The first
      > > >>> chapter is Ojibwemowin: Ojibwe Oral Tradition and it describes the
      > > >>> importance of language, the oral tradition, storytelling, and the
      > > >>> story of creation. The author relies on the Delaware Nation's
      > > >>> Wallum Olum as a key source for Ojibwe history and origins. http://www.ojibwe.org/
      > > >>> The sources detail the Red Score/ Wallum Olum.
      > > >>> > This source has been reverted for the third time on the Walam
      > > >>> Olum page. However, the Wallum Olum is specifically attributed to
      > > >>> the Ojibwe Ancestors (Lenni Lenape) in these sources.
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> > Suggest looking at the overview description about the Ojibwe
      > > >>> documentatary here http://www.ojibwe.org/home/overview_description.html
      > > >>> It should be sourced to show that "PBS Waasa Inaabidaa…We Look
      > > >>> In All Directions is a six-part television documentary series
      > > >>> produced by WDSE in Duluth, Minn., about the second largest tribe
      > > >>> in North America, the Anishinaabe/Ojibwe (Chippewa) nation of the
      > > >>> upper Great Lakes region. The series includes more than one
      > > >>> hundred (100) interviews with tribal elders, historians, youth and
      > > >>> leaders from the ninteen (19) Ojibwe bands in Michigan, Wisconsin
      > > >>> and Minnesota. These interviews, along with 3,000 archival
      > > >>> photographs, interviews with academic historians, original and
      > > >>> historic artwork, and dramatic re-enactments, illustrate the
      > > >>> Ojibwe people, culture and language through the past two
      > > >>> centuries."... As stated in the Waasa Inaabidaa, the Lenni Lenape
      > > >>> were the ancient ancestors of the Ojibwe. "An Epic Story of
      > > >>> migration, known
      > > >>> > as the Wallum Olum, Was told by our ancient ancestors, the Lenni
      > > >>> Lenape."
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> > ------------------------------------
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> > ------------------------------------
      > > >>> >
      > > >>> > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > > >>> >
      > > >>>
      > > >>
      > > >
      > >
      >
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