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Cahokia

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  • kbs2244
    Not to take away from Cahokia. But I believe there was a mound on the St Louis side, long since flattened, that was larger than Monks. The is still a Mound
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 9, 2011
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      Not to take away from Cahokia.
      But I believe there was a mound on the St Louis side, long since flattened, that was larger than Monks.
      The is still a Mound Street in St Louis.
      There is some speculation that the St Louis side had more, and larger, mounds that the Cahokia side.
      They were just flattened sooner due to the west side being a better building site.
      Cahokia lasted as long as it did only because it was an inferior site and did not attract the big buck developers that could afford to remove or mine a mound.
    • Ted Sojka
      Cahokia and other mounds were used for railroad fill when the bridges were built over the River. A portion of monks was mined away I believe on the West Side
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 10, 2011
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        Cahokia and other mounds were used for railroad fill when the bridges were built over the River.  A portion of monks was mined away I believe on the West Side in the 1800's.   This was not unusual during that time period.  The largest number of mounds in the Upper Midwest at Harper's Ferry. Iowa, estimated at 1200, were destroyed and there are about five left.  The Army Corps of Engineers after flooding a few yeas ago, stabilized the banks to protect the remaining mounds at the Sandy Point Cemetery,  It also contains the remains of Harper the town founder and other early residents.

        This site is a few miles up river from the Effigy Mounds National Monument which was established in 1950.   There is a museum, trails, and guided tours of the mounds.   You can visit on line at,    http://www.nps.gov/efmo/index.htm

        This earthworks were regularly farmed over in the state of Iowa in the last century as the state became populated after it was opened for settlement in the 1850's, although people like Julien Dubuque had a lead mining grant here sating from the Spanish claim and there is a state park that is called the Mines of Spain near the town which bears his name.

        Native Earthworks Preservation / Iowa
        On Sep 9, 2011, at 12:24 PM, kbs2244 wrote:

         

        Not to take away from Cahokia.
        But I believe there was a mound on the St Louis side, long since flattened, that was larger than Monks.
        The is still a Mound Street in St Louis.
        There is some speculation that the St Louis side had more, and larger, mounds that the Cahokia side.
        They were just flattened sooner due to the west side being a better building site.
        Cahokia lasted as long as it did only because it was an inferior site and did not attract the big buck developers that could afford to remove or mine a mound.


      • Vincent Barrows
        Ted, Kbs; Cahokia s location very near the confluence of the Missouri, Mississippi, Illinois,  Rivers made it a hub for trade networks and power. The size
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 10, 2011
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          Ted, Kbs; Cahokia's location very near the confluence of the Missouri, Mississippi, Illinois,  Rivers made it a hub for trade networks and power. The size and influence of the city is shown by Evidence inluding obsidian, shark teeth, copper, marine shells, etc.  Monks mound remaining size (21,551623 cubic feet of earth) was reduced by modern destruction but is still a remarkable. A portion of the west side was removed to make a road to the top of the mound in the 1800's. A conical mound that was once on the top of the mound at the southeast corner was destroyed. In 2007, an additional 30,000 cubic feet was removed from the monks mound by backhoes.
          Vince
           

          --- On Sat, 9/10/11, Ted Sojka <tedsojka@...> wrote:

          From: Ted Sojka <tedsojka@...>
          Subject: Re: [ancient_waterways_society] Cahokia
          To: ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Saturday, September 10, 2011, 11:31 AM

           
          Cahokia and other mounds were used for railroad fill when the bridges were built over the River.  A portion of monks was mined away I believe on the West Side in the 1800's.   This was not unusual during that time period.  The largest number of mounds in the Upper Midwest at Harper's Ferry. Iowa, estimated at 1200, were destroyed and there are about five left.  The Army Corps of Engineers after flooding a few yeas ago, stabilized the banks to protect the remaining mounds at the Sandy Point Cemetery,  It also contains the remains of Harper the town founder and other early residents.

          This site is a few miles up river from the Effigy Mounds National Monument which was established in 1950.   There is a museum, trails, and guided tours of the mounds.   You can visit on line at,    http://www.nps.gov/efmo/index.htm

          This earthworks were regularly farmed over in the state of Iowa in the last century as the state became populated after it was opened for settlement in the 1850's, although people like Julien Dubuque had a lead mining grant here sating from the Spanish claim and there is a state park that is called the Mines of Spain near the town which bears his name.

          Native Earthworks Preservation / Iowa
          On Sep 9, 2011, at 12:24 PM, kbs2244 wrote:

           
          Not to take away from Cahokia.
          But I believe there was a mound on the St Louis side, long since flattened, that was larger than Monks.
          The is still a Mound Street in St Louis.
          There is some speculation that the St Louis side had more, and larger, mounds that the Cahokia side.
          They were just flattened sooner due to the west side being a better building site.
          Cahokia lasted as long as it did only because it was an inferior site and did not attract the big buck developers that could afford to remove or mine a mound.


        • Ted Sojka
          Here is an excellent article on this once great city that was along the Mississippi hundreds of years before Columbus arrived.
          Message 4 of 4 , May 12 7:05 AM
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            Here is an excellent article on this once great city that was along
            the Mississippi hundreds of years before Columbus arrived.

            http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2011/01/cahokia/hodges-text/1
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