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DaVincis of Dirt

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  • james m clark jr
    Thanks Vince for adding the link of this article at the AWS site. Notifcatation email was recieved at 8:55 am Saturday morning. After watching the movie The
    Message 1 of 7 , May 8, 2011
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      Thanks Vince for adding the link of this article at the AWS site. Notifcatation email was recieved at 8:55 am Saturday morning.

      After watching the movie The Eagle I can't help but wonder if this could also be related in construction as the mounds in Scotland as well.

      be well,
      jamey
    • Vince
      Taking this opportunity to discuss the DaVincis of Dirt Article. The article discusses the use of color in Moundbuilding. This use of colored soil, sand, clay,
      Message 2 of 7 , May 28, 2011
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        Taking this opportunity to discuss the DaVincis of Dirt Article. The article discusses the use of color in Moundbuilding. This use of colored soil, sand, clay, etc is a common trait that European Moundbuilders used. Their mounds were called "barrows" and utilized the colored soil in layers of varying thickness and composition.

        Non local colored soils found on Monks Mound indicates that it is likely that the earth used to build the mounds did not all come from local sources, but was instead brought in from larger distances.

        For discussion, the use of color has been found to be done to create imagery in Shiloh mound.



        --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "james m clark jr" <jameyboy@...> wrote:
        >
        > Thanks Vince for adding the link of this article at the AWS site. Notifcatation email was recieved at 8:55 am Saturday morning.
        >
        > After watching the movie The Eagle I can't help but wonder if this could also be related in construction as the mounds in Scotland as well.
        >
        > be well,
        > jamey
        >
      • Vince
        After the Monks Mound excavations of 2007, the use of color was found: The cedar and bald cypress posts that were nocked out of place by the backhoes and the
        Message 3 of 7 , May 28, 2011
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          After the Monks Mound excavations of 2007, the use of color was found: "The cedar and bald cypress posts that were nocked out of place by the backhoes and the large limestone slabs encountered during this activity were only one part of the archeology. The construction sequence and possibility for painted images on the mounds original surfaces are of important archaeological value."

          The DaVincis of Dirt article States "they each advocate the need to understand that mounds were complex features that incorporated social, mythological, historical, and political meaning in their construction, form, history, and content."

          --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Vince" <v_barrows@...> wrote:
          >
          > Taking this opportunity to discuss the DaVincis of Dirt Article. The article discusses the use of color in Moundbuilding. This use of colored soil, sand, clay, etc is a common trait that European Moundbuilders used. Their mounds were called "barrows" and utilized the colored soil in layers of varying thickness and composition.
          >
          > Non local colored soils found on Monks Mound indicates that it is likely that the earth used to build the mounds did not all come from local sources, but was instead brought in from larger distances.
          >
          > For discussion, the use of color has been found to be done to create imagery in Shiloh mound.
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "james m clark jr" <jameyboy@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Thanks Vince for adding the link of this article at the AWS site. Notifcatation email was recieved at 8:55 am Saturday morning.
          > >
          > > After watching the movie The Eagle I can't help but wonder if this could also be related in construction as the mounds in Scotland as well.
          > >
          > > be well,
          > > jamey
          > >
          >
        • Vince
          Thomas Ramey took possession of Monks Mound around 1860 and a cellar was built into the mounds summit to a depth of eight or nine feet. It was noted that the
          Message 4 of 7 , May 28, 2011
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            Thomas Ramey took possession of Monks Mound around 1860 and a cellar was built into the mounds summit to a depth of eight or nine feet. It was noted that the composition of the layers of the summit included black loam, bluish sticky clay, sandy loam, white and yellow sand, yellow loess, and nearly every kind of earth, deposited in basketloads. Scientists and writers have puzzled over where the colored earth used to build the mounds came from without solution.

            Photos of Monks Mound construction sequence show a "Venir"
            http://s243.photobucket.com/albums/ff280/Marburg72/

            Perhaps these colored layers composed elaborate earth paintings. The striking colored mound covered with colored painted images would be most appropriate for this type of structure. The paintings may have been similar Hopewell style birdman form or painted images similar to the Birdman tablet found at the site With the destructive excavation methods used, we will never know for sure if the destroyed layers contained imagery that archaeologist refer to as the "Southeastern Ceremonial Complex".

            Several other examples of Mound Earth paintings have been noted in mounds including Wickliffe Mounds and Shiloh National Military Park.

            Wickliffe Mounds Sun Circle Floor Painting, Sun Circle Floor Painting feature was found during excavation at Wickliffe Mounds, KY. The description of the circle at the Wickliffe Mounds stated:

            "In the summer of 1994, The Murray State University archaeological field crew, directed by Dr. Kit Wesler, Professor of Archaeology, Department of Geosciences at Murray State University, along with a consortium of other universities making up the Middle Mississippi Survey, excavated around the cemetery at the Wickliffe Mounds archaeological site (15BA4) as part of an extensive research project. A Mississippian era house floor was discovered during the excavation process, located west of the cemetery (Mound C) and north of the smaller platform mound (Mound B). The excavation revealed a fired clay floor, with a painting of a circle and cross motif, a Native American symbol often referred to as a Sun Circle.

            The Sun Circle (cross inside circle) is a widespread symbol in Mississippian and Southeastern Native American art. Its meaning combines the four directions, the circle of the earth, and the sacred fire, the sun and perhaps other symbolism. This motif is depicted on pottery, shell and stone and is a symbol of the Southeastern Ceremonial Complex."

            Other examples of the use of color in mounds include Shiloh National Military Park in West Tennessee.



            --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Vince" <v_barrows@...> wrote:
            >
            > After the Monks Mound excavations of 2007, the use of color was found: "The cedar and bald cypress posts that were nocked out of place by the backhoes and the large limestone slabs encountered during this activity were only one part of the archeology. The construction sequence and possibility for painted images on the mounds original surfaces are of important archaeological value."
            >
            > The DaVincis of Dirt article States "they each advocate the need to understand that mounds were complex features that incorporated social, mythological, historical, and political meaning in their construction, form, history, and content."
            >
            > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Vince" <v_barrows@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Taking this opportunity to discuss the DaVincis of Dirt Article. The article discusses the use of color in Moundbuilding. This use of colored soil, sand, clay, etc is a common trait that European Moundbuilders used. Their mounds were called "barrows" and utilized the colored soil in layers of varying thickness and composition.
            > >
            > > Non local colored soils found on Monks Mound indicates that it is likely that the earth used to build the mounds did not all come from local sources, but was instead brought in from larger distances.
            > >
            > > For discussion, the use of color has been found to be done to create imagery in Shiloh mound.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "james m clark jr" <jameyboy@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Thanks Vince for adding the link of this article at the AWS site. Notifcatation email was recieved at 8:55 am Saturday morning.
            > > >
            > > > After watching the movie The Eagle I can't help but wonder if this could also be related in construction as the mounds in Scotland as well.
            > > >
            > > > be well,
            > > > jamey
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • Vince
            Colored Soil has been found in excavations at: a. Monks Mound b. Wickliffe Mounds c. Shiloh National Military Park d. Neolithic
            Message 5 of 7 , May 28, 2011
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              Colored Soil has been found in excavations at:
              a. Monks Mound
              b. Wickliffe Mounds
              c. Shiloh National Military Park
              d. Neolithic and Bronze age Mounds

              Does anyone know of other examples?

              "mounds with specifically selected colored veneers (often red or white), that are symbolically charged colors in Indian mythology and cosmology (e.g., Cobb and Drake (2008),
              DeBoer (2005), Hamell (1992), Hudson (1976), Pursell (2004), for
              non-North American discussions see Gage, 1999), indicates the
              construction of the mound itself was certainly recognized by the
              builders as a socially embedded action communicating specific
              meaning to those who participated in activities at the social and
              political center."

              Could Sandpainting today be derived from Moundbuilding?

              "Our title makes reference to one
              of history's geniuses, who was both an artist as well as an engineer.
              We are convinced that like DaVinci, the Native American mound
              builders were far more than laboring drudges piling dirt with minimal
              effort or intentions. Mound building was an art and a science
              requiring considerable knowledge, skill and planning, hard work,
              and impressive aesthetic and symbolic expression. To identify
              and decipher these cultural manifestations, a geoarchaeological
              perspective, one emphasizing the stratigraphy at a range of scales
              within the context of the regional geomorphology, should be an
              integral part of the archaeological research. Only with such a perspective
              can we truly investigate the variability and meaning of
              these prehistoric earthworks."

              --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Vince" <v_barrows@...> wrote:
              >
              > Thomas Ramey took possession of Monks Mound around 1860 and a cellar was built into the mounds summit to a depth of eight or nine feet. It was noted that the composition of the layers of the summit included black loam, bluish sticky clay, sandy loam, white and yellow sand, yellow loess, and nearly every kind of earth, deposited in basketloads. Scientists and writers have puzzled over where the colored earth used to build the mounds came from without solution.
              >
              > Photos of Monks Mound construction sequence show a "Venir"
              > http://s243.photobucket.com/albums/ff280/Marburg72/
              >
              > Perhaps these colored layers composed elaborate earth paintings. The striking colored mound covered with colored painted images would be most appropriate for this type of structure. The paintings may have been similar Hopewell style birdman form or painted images similar to the Birdman tablet found at the site With the destructive excavation methods used, we will never know for sure if the destroyed layers contained imagery that archaeologist refer to as the "Southeastern Ceremonial Complex".
              >
              > Several other examples of Mound Earth paintings have been noted in mounds including Wickliffe Mounds and Shiloh National Military Park.
              >
              > Wickliffe Mounds Sun Circle Floor Painting, Sun Circle Floor Painting feature was found during excavation at Wickliffe Mounds, KY. The description of the circle at the Wickliffe Mounds stated:
              >
              > "In the summer of 1994, The Murray State University archaeological field crew, directed by Dr. Kit Wesler, Professor of Archaeology, Department of Geosciences at Murray State University, along with a consortium of other universities making up the Middle Mississippi Survey, excavated around the cemetery at the Wickliffe Mounds archaeological site (15BA4) as part of an extensive research project. A Mississippian era house floor was discovered during the excavation process, located west of the cemetery (Mound C) and north of the smaller platform mound (Mound B). The excavation revealed a fired clay floor, with a painting of a circle and cross motif, a Native American symbol often referred to as a Sun Circle.
              >
              > The Sun Circle (cross inside circle) is a widespread symbol in Mississippian and Southeastern Native American art. Its meaning combines the four directions, the circle of the earth, and the sacred fire, the sun and perhaps other symbolism. This motif is depicted on pottery, shell and stone and is a symbol of the Southeastern Ceremonial Complex."
              >
              > Other examples of the use of color in mounds include Shiloh National Military Park in West Tennessee.
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Vince" <v_barrows@> wrote:
              > >
              > > After the Monks Mound excavations of 2007, the use of color was found: "The cedar and bald cypress posts that were nocked out of place by the backhoes and the large limestone slabs encountered during this activity were only one part of the archeology. The construction sequence and possibility for painted images on the mounds original surfaces are of important archaeological value."
              > >
              > > The DaVincis of Dirt article States "they each advocate the need to understand that mounds were complex features that incorporated social, mythological, historical, and political meaning in their construction, form, history, and content."
              > >
              > > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Vince" <v_barrows@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Taking this opportunity to discuss the DaVincis of Dirt Article. The article discusses the use of color in Moundbuilding. This use of colored soil, sand, clay, etc is a common trait that European Moundbuilders used. Their mounds were called "barrows" and utilized the colored soil in layers of varying thickness and composition.
              > > >
              > > > Non local colored soils found on Monks Mound indicates that it is likely that the earth used to build the mounds did not all come from local sources, but was instead brought in from larger distances.
              > > >
              > > > For discussion, the use of color has been found to be done to create imagery in Shiloh mound.
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "james m clark jr" <jameyboy@> wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > > Thanks Vince for adding the link of this article at the AWS site. Notifcatation email was recieved at 8:55 am Saturday morning.
              > > > >
              > > > > After watching the movie The Eagle I can't help but wonder if this could also be related in construction as the mounds in Scotland as well.
              > > > >
              > > > > be well,
              > > > > jamey
              > > > >
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • Ted Sojka
              The soil on the conical mounds at Effigy Mounds National Monument is layered like a cake. Each clearing of the mound, through burning off, was covered by a
              Message 6 of 7 , May 29, 2011
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                The soil on the conical mounds at Effigy Mounds National Monument is layered like a cake.  Each clearing of the mound, through burning off, was covered by a layer of mud from the River's edge on the Mississippi.  Different colors for different years of sediment used in the process, at minimum, or by design of the architects.   You can see the tamping marks on the layers of more clay like soil, of the baskets used to carry it up the hillsides to the mounds.

                Ted Sojka
                Iowa Native Earthworks Preservation


                On May 28, 2011, at 7:37 PM, Vince wrote:


                Colored Soil has been found in excavations at:
                a. Monks Mound
                b. Wickliffe Mounds
                c. Shiloh National Military Park
                d. Neolithic and Bronze age Mounds

                Does anyone know of other examples?

                "mounds with specifically selected colored veneers (often red or white), that are symbolically charged colors in Indian mythology and cosmology (e.g., Cobb and Drake (2008),
                DeBoer (2005), Hamell (1992), Hudson (1976), Pursell (2004), for
                non-North American discussions see Gage, 1999), indicates the
                construction of the mound itself was certainly recognized by the
                builders as a socially embedded action communicating specific
                meaning to those who participated in activities at the social and
                political center."

                Could Sandpainting today be derived from Moundbuilding?

                "Our title makes reference to one
                of history's geniuses, who was both an artist as well as an engineer.
                We are convinced that like DaVinci, the Native American mound
                builders were far more than laboring drudges piling dirt with minimal
                effort or intentions. Mound building was an art and a science
                requiring considerable knowledge, skill and planning, hard work,
                and impressive aesthetic and symbolic expression. To identify
                and decipher these cultural manifestations, a geoarchaeological
                perspective, one emphasizing the stratigraphy at a range of scales
                within the context of the regional geomorphology, should be an
                integral part of the archaeological research. Only with such a perspective
                can we truly investigate the variability and meaning of
                these prehistoric earthworks."

                --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Vince" <v_barrows@...> wrote:
                >
                > Thomas Ramey took possession of Monks Mound around 1860 and a cellar was built into the mounds summit to a depth of eight or nine feet. It was noted that the composition of the layers of the summit included black loam, bluish sticky clay, sandy loam, white and yellow sand, yellow loess, and nearly every kind of earth, deposited in basketloads. Scientists and writers have puzzled over where the colored earth used to build the mounds came from without solution. 
                > 
                > Photos of Monks Mound construction sequence show a "Venir"
                > http://s243.photobucket.com/albums/ff280/Marburg72/
                > 
                > Perhaps these colored layers composed elaborate earth paintings. The striking colored mound covered with colored painted images would be most appropriate for this type of structure. The paintings may have been similar Hopewell style birdman form or painted images similar to the Birdman tablet found at the site With the destructive excavation methods used, we will never know for sure if the destroyed layers contained imagery that archaeologist refer to as the "Southeastern Ceremonial Complex".
                > 
                > Several other examples of Mound Earth paintings have been noted in mounds including Wickliffe Mounds and Shiloh National Military Park.
                > 
                > Wickliffe Mounds Sun Circle Floor Painting, Sun Circle Floor Painting feature was found during excavation at Wickliffe Mounds, KY. The description of the circle at the Wickliffe Mounds stated:
                > 
                > "In the summer of 1994, The Murray State University archaeological field crew, directed by Dr. Kit Wesler, Professor of Archaeology, Department of Geosciences at Murray State University, along with a consortium of other universities making up the Middle Mississippi Survey, excavated around the cemetery at the Wickliffe Mounds archaeological site (15BA4) as part of an extensive research project. A Mississippian era house floor was discovered during the excavation process, located west of the cemetery (Mound C) and north of the smaller platform mound (Mound B). The excavation revealed a fired clay floor, with a painting of a circle and cross motif, a Native American symbol often referred to as a Sun Circle.
                > 
                > The Sun Circle (cross inside circle) is a widespread symbol in Mississippian and Southeastern Native American art. Its meaning combines the four directions, the circle of the earth, and the sacred fire, the sun and perhaps other symbolism. This motif is depicted on pottery, shell and stone and is a symbol of the Southeastern Ceremonial Complex."
                > 
                > Other examples of the use of color in mounds include Shiloh National Military Park in West Tennessee.
                > 
                > 
                > 
                > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Vince" <v_barrows@> wrote:
                > >
                > > After the Monks Mound excavations of 2007, the use of color was found: "The cedar and bald cypress posts that were nocked out of place by the backhoes and the large limestone slabs encountered during this activity were only one part of the archeology. The construction sequence and possibility for painted images on the mounds original surfaces are of important archaeological value."
                > > 
                > > The DaVincis of Dirt article States "they each advocate the need to understand that mounds were complex features that incorporated social, mythological, historical, and political meaning in their construction, form, history, and content."
                > > 
                > > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Vince" <v_barrows@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > Taking this opportunity to discuss the DaVincis of Dirt Article. The article discusses the use of color in Moundbuilding. This use of colored soil, sand, clay, etc is a common trait that European Moundbuilders used. Their mounds were called "barrows" and utilized the colored soil in layers of varying thickness and composition. 
                > > > 
                > > > Non local colored soils found on Monks Mound indicates that it is likely that the earth used to build the mounds did not all come from local sources, but was instead brought in from larger distances.
                > > > 
                > > > For discussion, the use of color has been found to be done to create imagery in Shiloh mound.
                > > > 
                > > > 
                > > > 
                > > > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "james m clark jr" <jameyboy@> wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > Thanks Vince for adding the link of this article at the AWS site. Notifcatation email was recieved at 8:55 am Saturday morning.
                > > > > 
                > > > > After watching the movie The Eagle I can't help but wonder if this could also be related in construction as the mounds in Scotland as well.
                > > > > 
                > > > > be well,
                > > > > jamey
                > > > >
                > > >
                > >
                >


              • james m clark jr
                Good point of logic Ted The following blog spot is where Brad Lepper choose to make mention of this same article. I was rather surprized he allowed my comment
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 8, 2011
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                  Good point of logic Ted


                  The following blog spot is where Brad Lepper choose to make mention of this same article. I was rather surprized he allowed my comment there at the same time Vince tried to get the ball rolling in the right direction. Perhaps this will become trendy in the educated groups. I for one sure look foward to that day.

                  Dan Bigman was the archaeologist whom last winter had started servaying the landscape at Ocmulgee National Monument in East Macon Georgia. I didn't recall how much of the sacred site was servayed at that time. Until today I was unable to connect via internet. The last cable guy to visit may have cut the cable to short or it was hit by another moving van for the forth time in 6 months.

                  The article by Dan Bigman may still be still viewable at the Macon Teleograph. As of now I've not event checked mail to see if Brad had sent anything or anything from AWS.

                  http://ohio-archaeology.blogspot.com/2011/04/ohios-davincis-of-dirt.html

                  --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, Ted Sojka <tedsojka@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > The soil on the conical mounds at Effigy Mounds National Monument is
                  > layered like a cake. Each clearing of the mound, through burning off,
                  > was covered by a layer of mud from the River's edge on the
                  > Mississippi. Different colors for different years of sediment used in
                  > the process, at minimum, or by design of the architects. You can see
                  > the tamping marks on the layers of more clay like soil, of the baskets
                  > used to carry it up the hillsides to the mounds.
                  >
                  > Ted Sojka
                  > Iowa Native Earthworks Preservation
                  >
                  >
                  > On May 28, 2011, at 7:37 PM, Vince wrote:
                  >
                  > >
                  > > Colored Soil has been found in excavations at:
                  > > a. Monks Mound
                  > > b. Wickliffe Mounds
                  > > c. Shiloh National Military Park
                  > > d. Neolithic and Bronze age Mounds
                  > >
                  > > Does anyone know of other examples?
                  > >
                  > > "mounds with specifically selected colored veneers (often red or
                  > > white), that are symbolically charged colors in Indian mythology and
                  > > cosmology (e.g., Cobb and Drake (2008),
                  > > DeBoer (2005), Hamell (1992), Hudson (1976), Pursell (2004), for
                  > > non-North American discussions see Gage, 1999), indicates the
                  > > construction of the mound itself was certainly recognized by the
                  > > builders as a socially embedded action communicating specific
                  > > meaning to those who participated in activities at the social and
                  > > political center."
                  > >
                  > > Could Sandpainting today be derived from Moundbuilding?
                  > >
                  > > "Our title makes reference to one
                  > > of history's geniuses, who was both an artist as well as an engineer.
                  > > We are convinced that like DaVinci, the Native American mound
                  > > builders were far more than laboring drudges piling dirt with minimal
                  > > effort or intentions. Mound building was an art and a science
                  > > requiring considerable knowledge, skill and planning, hard work,
                  > > and impressive aesthetic and symbolic expression. To identify
                  > > and decipher these cultural manifestations, a geoarchaeological
                  > > perspective, one emphasizing the stratigraphy at a range of scales
                  > > within the context of the regional geomorphology, should be an
                  > > integral part of the archaeological research. Only with such a
                  > > perspective
                  > > can we truly investigate the variability and meaning of
                  > > these prehistoric earthworks."
                  > >
                  > > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Vince"
                  > > <v_barrows@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > Thomas Ramey took possession of Monks Mound around 1860 and a
                  > > cellar was built into the mounds summit to a depth of eight or nine
                  > > feet. It was noted that the composition of the layers of the summit
                  > > included black loam, bluish sticky clay, sandy loam, white and
                  > > yellow sand, yellow loess, and nearly every kind of earth, deposited
                  > > in basketloads. Scientists and writers have puzzled over where the
                  > > colored earth used to build the mounds came from without solution.
                  > > >
                  > > > Photos of Monks Mound construction sequence show a "Venir"
                  > > > http://s243.photobucket.com/albums/ff280/Marburg72/
                  > > >
                  > > > Perhaps these colored layers composed elaborate earth paintings.
                  > > The striking colored mound covered with colored painted images would
                  > > be most appropriate for this type of structure. The paintings may
                  > > have been similar Hopewell style birdman form or painted images
                  > > similar to the Birdman tablet found at the site With the destructive
                  > > excavation methods used, we will never know for sure if the
                  > > destroyed layers contained imagery that archaeologist refer to as
                  > > the "Southeastern Ceremonial Complex".
                  > > >
                  > > > Several other examples of Mound Earth paintings have been noted in
                  > > mounds including Wickliffe Mounds and Shiloh National Military Park.
                  > > >
                  > > > Wickliffe Mounds Sun Circle Floor Painting, Sun Circle Floor
                  > > Painting feature was found during excavation at Wickliffe Mounds,
                  > > KY. The description of the circle at the Wickliffe Mounds stated:
                  > > >
                  > > > "In the summer of 1994, The Murray State University archaeological
                  > > field crew, directed by Dr. Kit Wesler, Professor of Archaeology,
                  > > Department of Geosciences at Murray State University, along with a
                  > > consortium of other universities making up the Middle Mississippi
                  > > Survey, excavated around the cemetery at the Wickliffe Mounds
                  > > archaeological site (15BA4) as part of an extensive research
                  > > project. A Mississippian era house floor was discovered during the
                  > > excavation process, located west of the cemetery (Mound C) and north
                  > > of the smaller platform mound (Mound B). The excavation revealed a
                  > > fired clay floor, with a painting of a circle and cross motif, a
                  > > Native American symbol often referred to as a Sun Circle.
                  > > >
                  > > > The Sun Circle (cross inside circle) is a widespread symbol in
                  > > Mississippian and Southeastern Native American art. Its meaning
                  > > combines the four directions, the circle of the earth, and the
                  > > sacred fire, the sun and perhaps other symbolism. This motif is
                  > > depicted on pottery, shell and stone and is a symbol of the
                  > > Southeastern Ceremonial Complex."
                  > > >
                  > > > Other examples of the use of color in mounds include Shiloh
                  > > National Military Park in West Tennessee.
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Vince"
                  > > <v_barrows@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > After the Monks Mound excavations of 2007, the use of color was
                  > > found: "The cedar and bald cypress posts that were nocked out of
                  > > place by the backhoes and the large limestone slabs encountered
                  > > during this activity were only one part of the archeology. The
                  > > construction sequence and possibility for painted images on the
                  > > mounds original surfaces are of important archaeological value."
                  > > > >
                  > > > > The DaVincis of Dirt article States "they each advocate the need
                  > > to understand that mounds were complex features that incorporated
                  > > social, mythological, historical, and political meaning in their
                  > > construction, form, history, and content."
                  > > > >
                  > > > > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Vince"
                  > > <v_barrows@> wrote:
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Taking this opportunity to discuss the DaVincis of Dirt
                  > > Article. The article discusses the use of color in Moundbuilding.
                  > > This use of colored soil, sand, clay, etc is a common trait that
                  > > European Moundbuilders used. Their mounds were called "barrows" and
                  > > utilized the colored soil in layers of varying thickness and
                  > > composition.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Non local colored soils found on Monks Mound indicates that it
                  > > is likely that the earth used to build the mounds did not all come
                  > > from local sources, but was instead brought in from larger distances.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > For discussion, the use of color has been found to be done to
                  > > create imagery in Shiloh mound.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "james m
                  > > clark jr" <jameyboy@> wrote:
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > Thanks Vince for adding the link of this article at the AWS
                  > > site. Notifcatation email was recieved at 8:55 am Saturday morning.
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > After watching the movie The Eagle I can't help but wonder
                  > > if this could also be related in construction as the mounds in
                  > > Scotland as well.
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > be well,
                  > > > > > > jamey
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
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