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History of U.S. Captain Michael Healy

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  • james m clark jr
    Sunday, August 27, 2006 Was Captain Michael Healy really a Black man? Many of the Coast Guard s Founding Fathers were Black. They were African Americans
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 7, 2010
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      Sunday, August 27, 2006
      Was Captain Michael Healy really a Black man?


      Many of the Coast Guard's Founding Fathers were Black. They were African Americans whether you subscribe to the one-drop rule or not.
      Captain Michael A. Healy, the only African American to have a command or commission in any of the Coast Guard's predecessor services, commanded the cutter Bear from 1887 to 1895. Healy retired as the third highest-ranking officer from the Revenue Cutter Service.
      One of ten children born in Macon, Georgia, to an Irish immigrant and a slave of mixed blood, Healy habitually ran away from school. At the urging of his brother, who felt sea life would discipline the youngster, the 15-year-old Healy was hired as a cabin boy abroad the clipper Jumna in 1855. He applied to and was accepted by the Revenue Cutter Service in March of 1865, was promoted to Second Lieutenant in June 1886, and to First Lieutenant in July 1870.
      As First Lieutenant, Healy was ordered aboard the cutter Rush, to patrol Alaskan waters for the first time. He became known as a brilliant seaman and was considered by many the best sailor in the North. A feature article in the January 28, 1884 New York Sun stated: "Captain Mike Healy is a good deal more distinguished person in the waters of the far Northwest than any president of the United States or my potentate in Europe has yet become."
      Healy distinguished himself when he took command of the cutter Bear, considered by many the greatest polar ship of its time, in 1886. The ship was charged with "seizing any vessel found sealing in the Bering Sea." By 1892, the Bear, Rush and Corwin had made so many seizures that tension developed between the United States and British merchants. Healy was also tasked with bringing medical and other aid to the Alaska Natives, making weather and ice reports, preparing navigation charts, rescuing distressed vessels, transporting special passengers and supplies, and fighting violators of federal laws. He served as deputy U.S. Marshal and represented federal law in Alaska for many years.
      On one of Bear's annual visits to King Island, Healy found a native population reduced to 100 people and begging for food. After ordering food and clothing, Healy worked with Dr. Sheldon Jackson of the Bureau of Education to import reindeer from the Siberian Chukchi, another Eskimo population. During the next ten years, Revenue cutters brought some 1,100 reindeer to Alaska. The Bureau of Education took charge of landing and distributing the deer, and missionary schools taught the natives to raise and care for the animals. By 1940, Alaska's domesticated reindeer herds had risen to 500,000.
      The Coast Guard named an icebreaker for Michael Healy, in acknowledgment of his inspiring commitment to the Service, including his invaluable assistance to Alaska Natives.

      Rest at:

      http://cgachasehall.blogspot.com/2006/08/captain-michael-healy-was-black-man.html
    • james m clark jr
      It was in July of 2009 that I first was informed of Michael Healy. The descution begain with a relitive who is fond of literature and she just happened to have
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 12, 2010
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        It was in July of 2009 that I first was informed of Michael Healy.
        The descution begain with a relitive who is fond of literature and she just happened to have an American Classic I was fimilar with so I went with that and took it a step futher back to the 1840's to where some of the information had come from reguard Ben Hur. Then she basically began telling me this story.

        Her son and daughter had both joined the U.S. Navy at the time I had considered joining the U.S. Coast Guard many years ago. The artical that this cadet posted is basically from the Macon Telegraph he merely attemted to put in his own words and evadently went to the library at Chase Hall and to his suprise the artical had more information. He may have attemted to take the legal route as a proud U.S. Cadet but was overwelmed with the rediclusly high fee of single articles...and over 1000.00 namely for Journalist subscription fee for past articles from a local newspaper.

        For the traditional annual Navy Army NCAA football game as aired yesterday whoever the camra man was that captured that moment when the cadets were being informed of Prayer it was A cadet of of the U.S. Navy that looked around and seen that he noticed not one removing their hat as an act of respect in the southern tradition and did so in a time of leasure under his own power.

        Under the curcumstances this article was the most suited.

        be well,
        jamey

        "I may have to respect it but it doesn't mean I have to like it"


        Sunday, August 27, 2006
        Was Captain Michael Healy really a Black man?


        Many of the Coast Guard's Founding Fathers were Black. They were African Americans whether you subscribe to the one-drop rule or not.
        Captain Michael A. Healy, the only African American to have a command or commission in any of the Coast Guard's predecessor services, commanded the cutter Bear from 1887 to 1895. Healy retired as the third highest-ranking officer from the Revenue Cutter Service.
        One of ten children born in Macon, Georgia, to an Irish immigrant and a slave of mixed blood, Healy habitually ran away from school. At the urging of his brother, who felt sea life would discipline the youngster, the 15-year-old Healy was hired as a cabin boy abroad the clipper Jumna in 1855. He applied to and was accepted by the Revenue Cutter Service in March of 1865, was promoted to Second
        Lieutenant in June 1886, and to First Lieutenant in July 1870.
        As First Lieutenant, Healy was ordered aboard the cutter Rush, to patrol Alaskan waters for the first time. He became known as a brilliant seaman and was considered by many the best sailor in the North. A feature article in the January 28, 1884 New York Sun stated: "Captain Mike Healy is a good deal more distinguished person in the waters of the far Northwest than any president of
        the United States or my potentate in Europe has yet become."
        Healy distinguished himself when he took command of the cutter Bear, considered by many the greatest polar ship of its time, in 1886. The ship was charged with "seizing any vessel found sealing in the Bering Sea." By 1892, the Bear, Rush and Corwin had made so many seizures that tension developed between the United States and British merchants. Healy was also tasked with bringing medical and
        other aid to the Alaska Natives, making weather and ice reports, preparing navigation charts, rescuing distressed vessels, transporting special passengers and supplies, and fighting violators of federal laws. He served as deputy U.S. Marshal and represented federal law in Alaska for many years. On one of Bear's annual visits to King Island, Healy found a native population reduced to 100 people and begging for food. After ordering food and clothing, Healy worked with Dr. Sheldon Jackson of the Bureau of Education to import
        reindeer from the Siberian Chukchi, another Eskimo population. During the next ten years, Revenue cutters brought some 1,100 reindeer to Alaska. The Bureau of Education took charge of landing and distributing the deer, and missionary schools taught the natives to raise and care for the animals. By 1940, Alaska's domesticated reindeer herds had risen to 500,000.
        The Coast Guard named an icebreaker for Michael Healy, in acknowledgment of his inspiring commitment to the Service, including his invaluable assistance to Alaska Natives.

        Rest at:

        http://cgachasehall.blogspot.com/2006/08/captain-michael-healy-was-black-man.htm\
        l
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