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Re: [ancient_waterways_society] Welcome new member & Tidewater Historian update

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  • Jeff
    Hello, Susan, all.   I found your group listed on Rick Ozman s Oopa-Loopa Cafe site, so I signed up. I have apprecied the study of antiquities, since noticing
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 16, 2010
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      Hello, Susan, all.
       
      I found your group listed on Rick Ozman's Oopa-Loopa Cafe site, so I signed up. I have apprecied the study of antiquities, since noticing Michael Wood's BBC/PBS documentary, In Search of the Trojan War, and, also, since a high school teacher sparked my interest. I will try to write some more soon, but am trying to do some work on a remodeling project today.
       
      Yours Sincerely,
       
      Jeff

      --- On Thu, 10/14/10, Susan <beldingenglish@...> wrote:
      From: Susan <beldingenglish@...>
      Subject: [ancient_waterways_society] Welcome new member & Tidewater Historian update
      To: ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Thursday, October 14, 2010, 12:45 PM
      Welcome to the newest member, Jeff.  I hope you will enjoy our group.  Soon as I can get online time again I will send you an email w/Ancient Waterways Society greeting and list of web sites, links from a few of our members. 
      We have a number of members here from Virginia, W. Virginia and East Coast who might especially enjoy a blog we mentioned here some time back set up by a professor named Sean Heuvel called The Tidewater Historian.   Some of you may recall his article "The Knights Templar and Holy Grail in America? following the History Channel documentary on Scott Wolter's book.  One of our members, David Brody commented at that site:  http://tidewaterhistorian.blogspot.com/search/label/Knights%20Templar
      Currently at http://tidewaterhistorian.blogspot.com/  his blog contains mainly articles and data of more recent history.  Most of you know my passion for ancient copper/copper mining and I am enclosing here the following note sent yesterday.
      Sean,
      I'd sent the following link about copper fingerprinting to geologist Scott Wolter last fall. Today noticed that article #49 pertains to the Tidewater region of Virginia and thought you might enjoy putting it in your blog.   Thank you for your fine web site.
       
      Susan English, traveling along the ancient Great Lakes-Mississippi Riverways ...
       
      from
      A Brief History of Copper
      (Released October 2005)
       
       by Marianne Stanczak
      #49. Righting History (C. PELLERIN).
      American Archaeology, Vol. 5, No. 1, pp. 29-33, 2001, pp. Spring.
       
      Virginia's Tidewater region, with its famous Jamestown settlement, is rich in history. In 1994 the original Jamestown settlement was identified. It is located in a pasture in the floodplain on the Rivanna River just north of Charlottesville, Virginia. In the summer of 2000, Jeffrey Hantman and 20 of his students in the archaeology department at the University of Virginia excavated units at what is believed to be the Indian village of Monasukapanough, which was included on a map drawn by John Smith in 1612. The researchers have found the village midden (refuse heap), which contains rare artifacts dating to the 15-17th centuries. Hantman hopes to open up a broad area to learn more about the structure of the village, one of the largest in the Monacan territory and one of few contemporary with the Jamestown settlement. When European settlers moved in after the Monacans, they cleared the fields at the river. This caused increased flooding that deposited about a foot of silt over the village. The river was probably the middle of the village, not the boundary. In 1784 Thomas Jefferson conducted a systemic excavation of a large burial mound at Monasukapanough, using trenching and stratigraphy (geology that deals with the origin, composition, distribution, and succession of data) strategies. He recorded it in his "Notes of the State of Virginia." Hantman says Jefferson's technique was about 100 years ahead of his time. It was the first scientific excavation in North America. History records that the Monacans were hostile and barbaric. Hantman thinks otherwise. Evidence points to a sophisticated society whose members had no need to trade with the colonists. The Powhatan tribe valued copper and may have considered it a source of power and authority. The Powhatans and the Monacans were enemies, but in order to obtain copper, the Powhatans had to transport it through Monacan territory. John Smith and the colonists brought copper with them, so the Powhatans traded corn for the colonists' copper and became their allies, thus freeing them from dependence upon the Monacans. The Monacans were officially recognized by the State of Virginia in 1989 and have since applied for federal recognition of their Native American Status. One requirement for federal recognition is that the tribe document a continuous history in a particular region. The first data confirmation at the village site was from charcoal found near the river and radiocarbon dated--the data that came back was 1670. Having also discovered a deeper, earlier level of occupation that dates from 1300-1400, Hantman has documented continuous use of the site from that time through the contact period.
      See #49 article, from: "A Brief History of Copper" (released October 2005) by Marianne Stanczak: http://www.csa.com/discoveryguides/copper/abstracts-f.php

    • james m clark jr
      The late Dr. Herman L. Hoeh was one of the first men I have admired on the defusion of cultures. He adopted a philosophy may are not to fond of, including
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 7, 2011
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        The late Dr. Herman L. Hoeh was one of the first men I have admired on the defusion of cultures. He adopted a philosophy may are not to fond of, including myself, yet I have always considered his contrabution as a slight varation of what has been defined today as a historical TIMELINE that he had already written as his Compendium of World History Vol. 1 & 2 before may projects had developed by the late 60's. Many splinter groups from Ambasador College and later legally became a short lived accredited instututional as Ambasador University. Their former facilities are now owned by a nunery, Yet those who claim coyright privilages for their new facilities regarding Dr. Hoeh's work and those who have not both claim that right and so do I. The only thing I ask is prove what is ture and what is not.

        be well Brothers & Sisters,
        jamey



        Compendium of World History Vol.1
        http://www.earth-history.com/Various/Compendium/hhc1ch17.htm
        Chapter Seventeen .....
        How Greek History Was Corrupted
        Greeks Admit Homer Was Demented
        The Plot Centers on Troy
        Homer and the Lydian Kings
        Restoring Greek History Kings of Corinth
        The History of Athens The History of Sicyon Enter Sparta
        Who Were the Heraclidae?
        The History of Argos Genealogy of Danaus
        Sea Powers of Aegean and Eastern Mediterranean
        The History of Italy

        Compendium of World History Vol.2

        Chapter XII
        http://www.earth-history.com/Various/Compendium/hhc2ch12.htm


        Trojan Migration to France

        Trojan Kings of Isauria

        Trojan Kings of Sicambria and Pannonia

        Kings of Agrippina

        Princes of Brabant

        Dukes of Brabant

        Kings of Frisia

        Dukes of Frisia

        Second Group of Kings of Frisia

        Trojan Kings of the Belgians

        Kings of the Celts in Gaul

        Chapter XII A

        Further Migrations to France

        Sicambrian Kings

        The Kings of the Franks

        Dukes of the East Franks

        The Hapsburgs Enter

        The Dukes of Gaul

        Kings of France

        In Retrospect





        --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, Jeff <quarefremeruntgentes7@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello, Susan, all.
        >  
        > I found your group listed on Rick Ozman's Oopa-Loopa Cafe site, so I signed up. I have apprecied the study of antiquities, since noticing Michael Wood's BBC/PBS documentary, In Search of the Trojan War, and, also, since a high school teacher sparked my interest. I will try to write some more soon, but am trying to do some work on a remodeling project today.
        >  
        > Yours Sincerely,
        >  
        > Jeff
        >
        > --- On Thu, 10/14/10, Susan <beldingenglish@...> wrote:
        >
        > From: Susan <beldingenglish@...>
        > Subject: [ancient_waterways_society] Welcome new member & Tidewater Historian update
        > To: ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Thursday, October 14, 2010, 12:45 PM
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Welcome to the newest member, Jeff.  I hope you will enjoy our group.  Soon as I can get online time again I will send you an email w/Ancient Waterways Society greeting and list of web sites, links from a few of our members. 
        > We have a number of members here from Virginia, W. Virginia and East Coast who might especially enjoy a blog we mentioned here some time back set up by a professor named Sean Heuvel called The Tidewater Historian.   Some of you may recall his article "The Knights Templar and Holy Grail in America? following the History Channel documentary on Scott Wolter's book.  One of our members, David Brody commented at that site:  http://tidewaterhistorian.blogspot.com/search/label/Knights%20Templar
        > Currently at http://tidewaterhistorian.blogspot.com/%c2%a0 his blog contains mainly articles and data of more recent history.  Most of you know my passion for ancient copper/copper mining and I am enclosing here the following note sent yesterday.
        > Sean,
        > I'd sent the following link about copper fingerprinting to geologist Scott Wolter last fall. Today noticed that article #49 pertains to the Tidewater region of Virginia and thought you might enjoy putting it in your blog.   Thank you for your fine web site.
        >  
        > Susan English, traveling along the ancient Great Lakes-Mississippi Riverways ...
        >  
        > from
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > A Brief History of Copper
        > (Released October 2005)
        >  
        >
        >
        >
        >  
        > by Marianne Stanczak#49. Righting History (C. PELLERIN).
        > American Archaeology, Vol. 5, No. 1, pp. 29-33, 2001, pp. Spring.
        >  
        > Virginia's Tidewater region, with its famous Jamestown settlement, is rich in history. In 1994 the original Jamestown settlement was identified. It is located in a pasture in the floodplain on the Rivanna River just north of Charlottesville, Virginia. In the summer of 2000, Jeffrey Hantman and 20 of his students in the archaeology department at the University of Virginia excavated units at what is believed to be the Indian village of Monasukapanough, which was included on a map drawn by John Smith in 1612. The researchers have found the village midden (refuse heap), which contains rare artifacts dating to the 15-17th centuries. Hantman hopes to open up a broad area to learn more about the structure of the village, one of the largest in the Monacan territory and one of few contemporary with the Jamestown settlement. When European settlers moved in after the Monacans, they cleared the fields at the river. This caused increased flooding that deposited about
        > a foot of silt over the village. The river was probably the middle of the village, not the boundary. In 1784 Thomas Jefferson conducted a systemic excavation of a large burial mound at Monasukapanough, using trenching and stratigraphy (geology that deals with the origin, composition, distribution, and succession of data) strategies. He recorded it in his "Notes of the State of Virginia." Hantman says Jefferson's technique was about 100 years ahead of his time. It was the first scientific excavation in North America. History records that the Monacans were hostile and barbaric. Hantman thinks otherwise. Evidence points to a sophisticated society whose members had no need to trade with the colonists. The Powhatan tribe valued copper and may have considered it a source of power and authority. The Powhatans and the Monacans were enemies, but in order to obtain copper, the Powhatans had to transport it through Monacan territory. John Smith and the colonists
        > brought copper with them, so the Powhatans traded corn for the colonists' copper and became their allies, thus freeing them from dependence upon the Monacans. The Monacans were officially recognized by the State of Virginia in 1989 and have since applied for federal recognition of their Native American Status. One requirement for federal recognition is that the tribe document a continuous history in a particular region. The first data confirmation at the village site was from charcoal found near the river and radiocarbon dated--the data that came back was 1670. Having also discovered a deeper, earlier level of occupation that dates from 1300-1400, Hantman has documented continuous use of the site from that time through the contact period.
        > See #49 article, from: "A Brief History of Copper" (released October 2005) by Marianne Stanczak: http://www.csa.com/discoveryguides/copper/abstracts-f.php
        >
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