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Re: [ancient_waterways_society] Fw: ?

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  • Ted Sojka
    Brickmakers marks so they get paid for like piece work. Clay bricks made by hand in the East have these along the Hudson River. Ever see the stamps used to
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 23, 2010
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      Brickmakers marks so they get paid for like "piece" work.  Clay bricks made by hand in the East have these along the Hudson River.  Ever see the stamps used to mark logs on their ends?

      Just a guess.  ted
      On Jul 23, 2010, at 8:55 AM, charles bruns wrote:



      --- On Fri, 7/23/10, charles bruns <charbruns@...> wrote:

      > From: charles bruns <charbruns@...>
      > Subject: ?
      > To: ancient_waterways_society@...
      > Date: Friday, July 23, 2010, 8:53 AM
      > over 100 years ago duluth's main
      > street was a rail line running parralel to the lake. 
      > basalt bricks were cut from the hillside for a bed in the
      > red clay.  having collected a few, I noticed two of
      > them have the triple tap marks.  that is three heavy
      > chisel marks in a short line. (definately associated) 
      > they are distinct in that it seems a different hand made
      > each.  the tool strike shows a difference in the
      > chisels, plus they are 
      > struck from different angles, with differring force &
      > spacing.  
      > any comments?    chb
      > 
      > 
      >       
      > 


    • charles bruns
      yah, even had a one sided hammer to grade logs once to make that stamp.  these here are the product of stone cutters.  big bread loaf oblongs of black basalt
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 23, 2010
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        yah, even had a one sided hammer to grade logs once to make that stamp.  these here are the product of stone cutters.  big bread loaf oblongs of black basalt rock with three heavy strikes, - - -, on the largest frame.  I assume they are post contact (a railroad bed), yet speak of a tradition much older.  Thank you Ted for the tip.  I'll keep an eye out with fired clay bricks as more pre-1900 buildings are torn down in Duluth.  chb   

        --- On Fri, 7/23/10, Ted Sojka <tedsojka@...> wrote:

        From: Ted Sojka <tedsojka@...>
        Subject: Re: [ancient_waterways_society] Fw: ?
        To: ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Friday, July 23, 2010, 9:59 AM

         
        Brickmakers marks so they get paid for like "piece" work.  Clay bricks made by hand in the East have these along the Hudson River.  Ever see the stamps used to mark logs on their ends?

        Just a guess.  ted
        On Jul 23, 2010, at 8:55 AM, charles bruns wrote:



        --- On Fri, 7/23/10, charles bruns <charbruns@yahoo. com> wrote:

        > From: charles bruns <charbruns@yahoo. com>
        > Subject: ?
        > To: ancient_waterways_ society@yahoo. groups
        > Date: Friday, July 23, 2010, 8:53 AM
        > over 100 years ago duluth's main
        > street was a rail line running parralel to the lake. 
        > basalt bricks were cut from the hillside for a bed in the
        > red clay.  having collected a few, I noticed two of
        > them have the triple tap marks.  that is three heavy
        > chisel marks in a short line. (definately associated) 
        > they are distinct in that it seems a different hand made
        > each.  the tool strike shows a difference in the
        > chisels, plus they are 
        > struck from different angles, with differring force &
        > spacing.  
        > any comments?    chb
        > 
        > 
        >       
        > 



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