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Upcoming book (finally!)

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  • dgoudsward
    Westford Knight and Henry Sinclair Evidence of a 14th Century Scottish Voyage to America http://sn.im/xhe9k In the 14th century, Henry Sinclair, the Earl of
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 16, 2010
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      Westford Knight and Henry Sinclair
      Evidence of a 14th Century Scottish Voyage to America

      http://sn.im/xhe9k

      In the 14th century, Henry Sinclair, the Earl of Orkney and Lord of Roslin, set forth to the west on a voyage of discovery. Earl Henry's goal was to track down a rumored rich fishing area that we now know as Newfoundland's Grand Banks. What Sinclair would find was land beyond his expectations. He continued exploring the coast and rivers of the vast new land.

      On a windswept hill in Westford, Massachusetts, one of Earl Henry's companions died. In lieu of the appropriate funerary art befitting this Chief of the Clan Gunn and Crowner of Caithness, the best the explorers could do was to peck a rough effigy of the the fallen knight, a crude equivalent of the style of the day.

      And there it remained, misidentified as a petroglyph left by Indians, Colonials, Irish or Norse until 1954 when an archaeologist yielded to the wishes of his daughter and rediscovered evidence of Scottish explorations a century before Columbus.

      The journey that the Westford Knight carving has embarked on is far greater than that of the fallen soldier it represents.
    • Frode Th. Omdahl
      Well - bring foreward a picture of this inscription to the group - don t just advertise your book! Someone would even call this spam! Frode
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 16, 2010
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        Well - bring foreward a picture of this inscription to the group - don't just advertise your book! Someone would even call this spam!
         
         
        Frode
         
         
         
        ****************************************************************************************************************
        Frode Th. Omdahl
        Andrénbakken 10 A
        N-1392 Vettre
        Telefon 66 90 19 41  /  97 09 32 17
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2010 11:05 PM
        Subject: [ancient_waterways_society] Upcoming book (finally!)

         

        Westford Knight and Henry Sinclair
        Evidence of a 14th Century Scottish Voyage to America

        http://sn.im/xhe9k

        In the 14th century, Henry Sinclair, the Earl of Orkney and Lord of Roslin, set forth to the west on a voyage of discovery. Earl Henry's goal was to track down a rumored rich fishing area that we now know as Newfoundland's Grand Banks. What Sinclair would find was land beyond his expectations. He continued exploring the coast and rivers of the vast new land.

        On a windswept hill in Westford, Massachusetts, one of Earl Henry's companions died. In lieu of the appropriate funerary art befitting this Chief of the Clan Gunn and Crowner of Caithness, the best the explorers could do was to peck a rough effigy of the the fallen knight, a crude equivalent of the style of the day.

        And there it remained, misidentified as a petroglyph left by Indians, Colonials, Irish or Norse until 1954 when an archaeologist yielded to the wishes of his daughter and rediscovered evidence of Scottish explorations a century before Columbus.

        The journey that the Westford Knight carving has embarked on is far greater than that of the fallen soldier it represents.

      • Susan
        As a member of this group I have many times times extended an invitation to any of you here to let us know when you have an article, new book, documentary,
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 17, 2010
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          As a member of this group I have many times times extended an invitation to any of you here to let us know when you have an article,  new book, documentary, upcoming speaker engagement, etc. that relates to the ancient world, navigation, ancient waterways, etc.  I believe the strength of a group and synergy of members' efforts increase the more closely collaborative or encouraging members are with each other.
           
          My role is as an interconnector of people and resources and whenever I run across related research or activities things any of you are involved in, I post the information to the group.   I am not usually aware of the activities and projects of most members here--nor do I believe most of you are to each other, either--- so am always grateful when members list their current events,  works....such as when William Connnor's book was first published last year. There are a number of authors here among our diverse group and we which spans a huge geography.  I have noticed excessive and exploitive self-advertisement at other diffusionist groups, but none of our members has posted more than once in regard to one of their books.  In fact, most of you (and your work) are so anonymous that I have encouraged you to include links to your web pages, books, articles, etc. with your salutations so that others can find common ground (& waters) within your research,  interests, ties to conferences and other related groups, etc. 
           
          As you know, I have many books of my own and donations from others here for our group's "loaner library" which I started a few years ago  that I mail to requesting members here at my expense.  Awhile back David Goudsward had borrowed Scott Wolter's Hooked X book and when he returned it, sent a complimentary copy for our group's traveling library that he co-authored with the recently deceased Robert Stone: America's Stonehenge-The Mystery Hill Story.   I was not aware David had another book coming out so did appreciate the post about it.  Anyone wishing to borrow his Mystery Hill book, let me know.... 
           
          Kentuckyian Al Cornette mailed two complimentary copies of his book for group circulation.  The Sandstone Chronicles-Rock Art of the Red River Gorge-An Appalachian Journey  and  Seven Mountains and the Red Star-Corssing the Void in 2012-Understanding the Mayan Calendar and its Celestial Connection.
           
          I Jay Wakefield sent a complimentary copy of his book thinking it also relates well to this group: Rocks & Rows-Sailing Route Across the Atlantic and the Copper Trade-a Study of Bronze Age Petroglyphs,  Stone Circle and Row Monuments.  Thank you Al, David G, and Jay.
          Even if I do not know a  member here personally (nearly half of you are anonymous by name and place even to the host and co-host) do not hesitate to email me to borrow one of the newer books in our collection.  I will sbmit the full list of books again another time.  My eyesight is worsening, especially when more than a few minutes on the computer.  I finally qualify for Medicare after thirty years without, yet have not made an appointment for something so simple as cataract surgery. 
           
          Great reading all the excellent recent posts from almost a dozen of you.  With so many other active groups and related Facebook associations these days I was wondering if anyone was following Ancient Waterways posts any more. 
           
          Though the host and two co-hosts watch for blatant Spam, we are basically self-moderating here and welcome thoughtful comments, suggestions, and even acts of hospitality with newcomers and other members ,  etc.
           
          Thank you for your continuing membership and support.
           
          Susan

          --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "dgoudsward" <dave@...> wrote:
          >
          > Westford Knight and Henry Sinclair
          > Evidence of a 14th Century Scottish Voyage to America
          >
          > http://sn.im/xhe9k
          >
          > In the 14th century, Henry Sinclair, the Earl of Orkney and Lord of Roslin, set forth to the west on a voyage of discovery. Earl Henry's goal was to track down a rumored rich fishing area that we now know as Newfoundland's Grand Banks. What Sinclair would find was land beyond his expectations. He continued exploring the coast and rivers of the vast new land.
          >
          > On a windswept hill in Westford, Massachusetts, one of Earl Henry's companions died. In lieu of the appropriate funerary art befitting this Chief of the Clan Gunn and Crowner of Caithness, the best the explorers could do was to peck a rough effigy of the the fallen knight, a crude equivalent of the style of the day.
          >
          > And there it remained, misidentified as a petroglyph left by Indians, Colonials, Irish or Norse until 1954 when an archaeologist yielded to the wishes of his daughter and rediscovered evidence of Scottish explorations a century before Columbus.
          >
          > The journey that the Westford Knight carving has embarked on is far greater than that of the fallen soldier it represents.
          >
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