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Re: [ancient_waterways_society] Re: Aztalan Study of Human Bones video is still on "Tyranena TV" http://www.ustream.tv/channel/tyranena-tv

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  • Pamela Giese
    Hi Susan,   I also had trouble with the link--I m not sure why, possibly something in my security setting.  I was able to get there by 1) going to
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 13, 2010
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      Hi Susan,
       
      I also had trouble with the link--I'm not sure why, possibly something in my security setting.  I was able to get there by
      1) going to http://www.ustream. tv
      2) putting Aztalan in the Search box
      3) scrolling down to the bottom and the videos are there.
       
      Funny thing is, the URL displays as Steve provided, but I just tried going direct again and found I had to go the above route. 
       
      It's an interesting program.  It will be interesting to see the DNA evidence.  Ms. Barrett made some very interesting point on ritual cannablism.  Good stuff,
       
      Pam

      --- On Mon, 14/6/10, Susan <beldingenglish@...> wrote:

      From: Susan <beldingenglish@...>
      Subject: [ancient_waterways_society] Re: Aztalan Study of Human Bones video is still on "Tyranena TV" http://www.ustream.tv/channel/tyranena-tv
      To: ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Monday, 14 June, 2010, 0:17

       
      Steve,
      I was unable to pull up the video but the new information within the article you sent is very important .... Once again, it seems scientific investigators/ excavators (as well as the general public) throughout the 20th century readily accepted human remains found at Aztalan as the result of cannibalism.  It will be interesting to see if there is further substantiation to the grad student's findings that the cut bone evidence was the result of warfare. 
      I'd have likely driven to Aztalan/Lake Mills in S. Wisconsin to attend the March 13th lecture.  I spent many days nosing around Rock Lake after reading Frank Joseph's books during the 1080's and first became interested in reinvestigations of things ancient.
      Thank you, Steve,  for posting directly to Ancient Waterways and sharing this recent information with the group.  It is my hope the young researcher's study opens the door to deeper investigation and presents fairer, more comprehensive truth about ancient Aztlan/Tyranena and its peoples. 
      Susan
          
      --- In ancie$nt_waterways_ society@yahoogro ups.com, Steven Steigerwald <aztalan2008@ ...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Hi,
      > Aztalan Study of Human Bones is still on Tyranena TV
      > Looks like almost no one has seen it!
      > It was recorded at the L.D. Fargo Public Library as presented to the Friends of Aztalan State Park.
      > Robert Birmingham of the Friends of Aztalan State doe the intro on the video.
      > The lower bold print is the email info sent out by Robert (Bob) Birmingham for the program.
      > Talk on Aztalan Warfare
      >
      > Excavations at Aztalan by S.A Barrett of the Milwaukee Public Museum in the early 20th century produced much cut human bone that Barrett thought were the result of cannibalism. Aztalan at Aztalan State Park near Lake Mills was a large fortified town occupied by Mississippian and Woodland Indians between 1050 and 1200 A.D. However, a new analysis by archaeologist Katie Rudolph, a recent graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Anthropology master's degree program, indicates that the remains are largely the result of warfare. Ms Rudolph will give a free public presentation on her research entitled "Conflicted: Violence and the Aztalan Human Remains" at the L. D. Fargo Public Library, 120 E. Madison St, Lake Mills at 2:00 PM on Saturday, March 13. The presentation is sponsored by the Friends of Aztalan State Park. For more information, call the Friends' executive director, Bob Birmingham at (608) 516-3421.
      > The video is in 2 parts.
      > on: Tyranena-TV http://www.ustream. tv/channel/ tyranena- tv
      > Part 1: http://www.ustream. tv/recorded/ 6330470
      > Part 2: http://www.ustream. tv/recorded/ 6331299
      > (Recorded in only VGA 480 x 640 on a common $10 memory card using a $23 DVR as a test from a composite video feed but looks ok in a small screen.)
      > Steve S.
      > ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ ________
      > The New Busy is not the old busy. Search, chat and e-mail from your inbox.
      > http://www.windowsl ive.com/campaign /thenewbusy? ocid=PID28326: :T:WLMTAGL: ON:WL:en- US:WM_HMP: 042010_3
      >

    • Chris Patenaude
      Hello all, If anyone ever bothered to ask the Siouxan Lakota, Dakota, Nakota peoples, the answer to a lot of these questions are easily answered. Why spin
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 19, 2010
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        Hello all,
        If anyone ever bothered to ask the Siouxan Lakota, Dakota, Nakota peoples, the answer to a lot of these questions are easily answered. Why spin around in the European isolated pov stewpot making guesses instead of asking the proper Elders? Among the rest of the western woodland tribes and the bulk of the Plains Tribes 'proper', the going nick-name of the Lakota, especially, were "cut-throats". The Universal Indian Handsign for them, and other Sioux who allied themselves particularly with the Lakota, was an index finger slit across the throat like a knife.
         
        In battle, the whole head was specially prized as a war trophy, but with a great deal of respect for a powerful enemy taken. Back home, in the men's warrior lodge, the heads were cooked and eaten in deeply significant, solemn ceremony. The energy and 'medicine' of the deceased was acknowledged and transferred to the participants in an act of communion.
        Other portions of body parts were also occasionally taken and given the same sacred treatement, not as bragging or for food value, but as a part of transferring a vital spark from the posession of the enemy to the victors.
         
        I have not seen the described film nor its explained theories. I do not know what sample base of bones are being studied. It can be stated that the Lakota did not consume flesh of their own tribe(s) but only those of vanquished foes, won in direct fighting. However, there is no question among the Lakota themselves that there was designated consumption going on.
         
        -chris

        --- On Fri, 6/11/10, Steven Steigerwald <aztalan2008@...> wrote:

        From: Steven Steigerwald <aztalan2008@...>
        Subject: [ancient_waterways_society] Aztalan Study of Human Bones video is still on "Tyranena TV" http://www.ustream.tv/channel/tyranena-tv
        To: "Christi Ward" <cward9485@...>
        Date: Friday, June 11, 2010, 10:57 AM



        Hi,

        Aztalan Study of Human Bones is still on Tyranena TV

        Looks like almost no one has seen it!

        It was recorded at the L.D. Fargo Public Library as presented to the Friends of Aztalan State Park.

        Robert Birmingham of the Friends of Aztalan State doe the intro on the video.

        The lower bold print is the email info sent out by Robert (Bob) Birmingham for the program.

        Talk on Aztalan Warfare

        Excavations at Aztalan by S.A Barrett of the Milwaukee Public Museum in the 
        early 20th century produced much cut human bone that Barrett thought were the result of cannibalism. Aztalan at Aztalan State Park near Lake Mills was a large fortified town occupied by Mississippian and Woodland Indians between 1050 and 1200 A.D. However, a new analysis by archaeologist Katie Rudolph, a recent graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Anthropology master's degree program, indicates that the remains are largely  the result of warfare. Ms Rudolph will give a free public presentation on her research entitled "Conflicted: Violence and the Aztalan Human Remains" at the L. D. Fargo Public Library, 120 E. Madison St, Lake Mills at 2:00 PM on Saturday, March 13. The presentation is sponsored by the Friends of Aztalan State Park. For more information, call the Friends' executive director, Bob Birmingham at (608) 516-3421.

        The video is in 2 parts.

        on: Tyranena-TV http://www.ustream.tv/channel/tyranena-tv

        Part 1: http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/6330470

        Part 2: http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/6331299

        (Recorded in only VGA 480 x 640 on a common $10 memory card using a $23 DVR as a test from a composite video feed but looks ok in a small screen.) 

        Steve S.


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