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Re: Crocodile migration (bird/ turtle) to Floridian coast?

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  • james m. clark jr.
    I kind of figured along those lines was what he was refering to Rick. As for the marbles, my brother talked to a Wildlife Ranger he met in Savannah. And he
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 24, 2007
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      I kind of figured along those lines was what he was refering to Rick.

      As for the marbles, my brother talked to a Wildlife Ranger he met in
      Savannah. And he said those marbles were used to clean copper.(?)
      Other than that I haven't had time to search for additional info. To
      much work right now.

      be well,
      jamey

      --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Rick Osmon"
      <ozman@...> wrote:
      >
      > jamey,
      >
      > The crocs in the glades (and now even in the water hazards around
      > South Florida golf courses) are American Crocodiles. They are native
      > and they are genetically and anatomically distinct from Nile, South
      > Asian, and Australian crocs. They are bigger and a lot more prone to
      > attack humans than are alligators. If they were introduced, it was a
      > very long time ago (like many tens of thousands of years minimum).
      If
      > there are any of the other crocs there, they were almost certainly
      > introduced in historic times, but I never heard of any turning up.
      >
      > Looking forward to seeing those pictures.
      >
      > Oz
      >
      >
      > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "james m. clark
      jr."
      > <jameyboy@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Thanks for your insight Rick,
      > >
      > > I haven't heard of a Croc migration theory before either Rick.
      > > Perhap he didn't realize that the little crocs were introduced
      > > to the Everglades. I brought it up this morning and he pretty
      much
      > > hummed a familar tune, of necessity resorting to some external
      > > framework.
      > >
      > > At any rate, I was going to send pics to ancient waterways but I
      > > can't right now because my brother is on a week long fishing trip
      in
      > > Savannah.
      > >
      > > I may have some insight, I dare say within reason as far as the
      > > formation of these marbles. By the way, my brother said he got
      more
      > > of them than anyone else out of 3 or pehaps 4 people and says,
      there
      > > are more.
      > >
      > > In theory I would say that these marbles may have been partially
      made
      > > by nature. But the only natural way exists also a problem - how
      wound
      > > they have gotten to where they were found now?
      > >
      > > If you bathed in running clear water they wouldn't be present,
      but if
      > > the river water was high and receeding you would notice little
      balls
      > > of clay rolling on the bed. If you were heading in either
      direction
      > > up river or down stream and wasn't sure if you would reach your
      > > destination it would be a smart idea to collect these little
      balls of
      > > clay as a repelant for days that are to sunny or warmer waters
      that
      > > are infested with mosquitos, nats, flies.
      > >
      > > When I first seen these rather bright pollished-like white
      marbles
      > > with a clay stain they somewhat reminded me of Lizzard eggs or
      turtle
      > > eggs, perhaps that was with some intentional use. I have spent
      many
      > > nights in the Flint River, when it's a full moon you can see your
      feet
      > > in 4 ft of water.
      > >
      > > be well,
      > > jamey
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "Rick Osmon"
      > > <ozman@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > I never heard of crocs migrating -- bison, birds and turtles,
      yes.
      > > But
      > > > nothing about nature would surprise me.
      > > >
      > > > A little more about the "marbles" your brother found. Neither
      clay
      > > nor
      > > > quartz would be good materials for musket balls, nor is steel.
      And
      > > > other than some specialized muskets called rampart guns, the
      bore
      > > was
      > > > rarely more than about .68 inches (your little finger is
      about .45
      > > > inches on average). Any ball bigger than an inch in diameter
      was
      > > meant
      > > > for something other than a shoulder-fired gun. Musket balls are
      made
      > > > of lead, tho gold would work just as well. Clay and quartz
      balls
      > > would
      > > > work fairly well for slings, however. Clay and stone balls are
      also
      > > > part of South American bolos, but those are usually about 2
      inches
      > > in
      > > > diameter.
      > > >
      > > > If you ever get a definitive answer on the marbles, I would
      love to
      > > > hear it because there have been thousands of them found along
      the
      > > > White River here in Indiana, but I never heard of a hundred in
      one
      > > > cache...
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "james m.
      clark
      > > jr."
      > > > <jameyboy@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > I have been informing a co worker on my current
      > > > > research on Wari/Huari Empire, Wari/Cherokee verb used in
      > > > > Cherokee language, and traditional Cherokee marble games.
      namey
      > > Wari
      > > > > board marbles from the Afrikan tradition with origins in
      Egypt
      > > said
      > > > > to intoduce "Island Wari" to Grand Cayman by Black Beard the
      > > Pirate
      > > > > opon his return from an Afrikan voyage.
      > > > >
      > > > > http://waynesword.palomar.edu/ww0603.htm
      > > > >
      > > > > At any rate, what lead me to this extrodanday research is
      marbles.
      > > > > I've never thoght much about marbles as a kid, but that was
      then.
      > > > > Weather clay, marble, and perhaps white quartz. The thing is
      they
      > > are
      > > > > rather large for Wari marbles and rather small for
      traditional
      > > > > Cherokee marbles, found by my brother while installing a
      fence on
      > > a
      > > > > horse ranch somewhere in Juelette Georgia not far from Rock
      Eagle
      > > or
      > > > > perhaps Indian Springs. In this area it is dotted along
      roadways,
      > > > > corries of clay granite, and marble.
      > > > >
      > > > > Out of a 102 count, 6 appear to be in a clay/marble state. I
      was
      > > > > thinking that they were perhaps used as musket shot, if not
      from
      > > the
      > > > > Civil War period then perhaps in the Revolutionary War period
      > > made by
      > > > > an African or either a Cherokee if it wasn't a fact that
      steel
      > > was a
      > > > > little hard to come by around this time, durring a war
      anyways.
      > > They
      > > > > vary in size somewhat like glass marbles.
      > > > >
      > > > > Anyway my co worker is a Floridian, He would tell me about
      turtle
      > > > > island and I'd tell him about the creation stories and
      homeless
      > > > > Seminole in Jacksonville etc. He has a natural interest about
      > > like me
      > > > > and it's good to keep me shape and he is a saltwater
      fisherman
      > > and
      > > > > I'm a fresh water fisherman. He seemed to assure me that this
      has
      > > > > been sometime resent and I was wondering if any of you guys
      has
      > > heard
      > > > > anything in the past decade or so about a Crocodile migration.
      > > > >
      > > > > be well,
      > > > > jamey
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
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