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Cave of the crystal maiden

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  • Vincent Barrows
    The following link shows a Mayan spelunking cave. Famous for watery hourglass entrance, lots of artifacts covered with stalagmites, and a handless skeleton
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 21, 2010
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      The following link shows a Mayan spelunking cave. Famous for watery hourglass entrance, lots of artifacts covered with stalagmites, and a handless skeleton covered in crystals.

      http://www.mayabelize.ca/maya/actun-tunichil-muknal.shtml

      On Sun Mar 21st, 2010 5:46 PM EDT Ted Sojka wrote:

      >Judi
      >
      >This is known as the Driftless Area, where the glaciers did not flatten. It was lakebed for a lake bigger than present day Lake Michigan.
      >
      >The flood state when ancient Lake Wisconsin burst its glacial till dam enclosure and carved out the valleys of the coulee region was around 12,000 years ago according to some books. The rivers here all have water carved caves several hundred feet above the valley floors. Many of these rock shelters had habitation sites and many have petroglyphs which I have been photographing for about three decades. I began doing this for Dr. R. Clark Mallam of Luther College who was president of the state archeological society at the time I began.
      >
      >You can see all the various levels of the water courses over the sand plain that rises up from the present day Wisconsin River. I would say the ghost eagle is about the third flood plane terrace above the present one. It sits more or less level with the base of Franks Hill, which is like and island in the valley. North about 50 miles are many stark bluffs of limestone that were waved washed islands according to signage from the Historical Society, and have many names like Shiprock, Rabbit Rock, Petenwell Rock, and Wausau's Rib Mountain is also one. From time to time on the upper Wisconsin you are above the fog in the lowlands when on top of one of these free standing bluffs, and it is easy to see from island to island as they are above this mirage of a lake that forms in moving fog as it dissipates. It is a sink that always is colder than surrounding areas in Winter, and this area was and is still filled with cranberry bogs. The elder who
      was leader of the band that our town is named, moved to that area for Summers to collect berries, dry fish, and other meats mixed with the berries. They Wintered further West along the Mississippi, until moved by the Military in 1840 with treaty manipulations. They were in Iowa in a kind of Gaza Strip known as the neutral zone during that decade until they were moved North into Minnesota. The chief wrote when he saw where the agents had picked for him to move, said that the worst swamp in Wisconsin, the place of "stinky water" was better than the land they were put on near Long Prairie Minnesota. They were moved again to near Mankato and then further West to South Dakota and Nebraska. The official reservation is in Ponca, Nebraska. Several bands moved back East and bought lands later on in several places in Wisconsin.
      >
      >ted
      >On Mar 21, 2010, at 3:59 PM, Judi Rudebusch wrote:
      >
      >>
      >> HI
      >> What is the elevations difference between the Ghost Eagle mound and the present creeks- that would have been hundreds of feet deep?
      >>
      >>
      >> Judi
      >>
      >>
      >
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