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Re: [ancient_waterways_society] pardo stone

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  • joe white
    O siyo Brothers, and Sisters, Is the Pardo Stone, on Page 17, Semitic Ogam? If so, what does it say in English that we can understand? Gah gey you e, Sitting
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 16, 2010
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      O'siyo Brothers, and Sisters,
       
      Is the Pardo Stone, on Page 17, Semitic Ogam?  If so, what does it say in English that we can understand?
       
      Gah gey you e,
       
      Sitting Owl
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Friday, January 15, 2010 10:04 PM
      Subject: [ancient_waterways_society] pardo stone

       

      The Pardo Stone is an inscribed stone introduced According to:
      http://www.knowital l.org/instantrep lay/files/ circle/Circle% 20of%20Inheritan ce%20Teacher% 20Guide.pdf

      A remarkable relic of Juan Pardo’s interior crossing was discovered in upstate South Carolina in
      June of 1935. A farmer plowing his field near Inman, about 12 miles from Spartanburg, upturned
      a large and well-preserved stone bearing peculiar marks and Roman numerals.
      Long before the white man’s arrival in this territory, these forests – in 1935, farmlands – were
      laced with Indian paths, crisscrossing and connecting neighboring tribes and towns. Most
      historians believe that Captain Pardo’s exploratory route took him across Spartanburg County,
      in the northwestern part of South Carolina, through Cherokee and Catawba lands. A known
      crossing point between the Cherokee and Catawba nations was located just a few miles south of
      the field in Inman, South Carolina, where the stone marker was found. The stone is now housed
      in the Spartanburg Museum.
      During the time of Pardo’s inland exploration, the fort at Santa Elena continued to grown, but
      not without difficulty and hardship. Disease epidemics broke out in the 1570’s, and there was
      trouble with the Indians near Santa Elena. Nonetheless, as the colony continued to grow,
      Menendez gradually transferred his headquarters from St. Augustine to Santa Elena. When
      Menendez’s wife and her attendants arrived in the New World, it was in Santa Elena that he
      settled them.
      After Menendez’s death in 1574, the new commander had trouble with both the settlers and the
      Indians. When the Indians attacked the fort in 1576, the settlers were forced to abandon it.
      Waiting in their vessels to depart, they watched the town and fort being burned by the Indians.

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