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Re: [ancient_waterways_society] Eastern Massachusetts find

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  • Frode Th. Omdahl
    Are there any inscriptions on this stone? Any possibility of closer-up pics? What does the back of it look like? Frode
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 8, 2010
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      Are there any inscriptions on this stone? Any possibility of closer-up pics? What does the back of it look like?
       
      Frode
       
       
      ****************************************************************************************************************
      Frode Th. Omdahl
      Andrénbakken 10 A
      N-1392 Vettre
      Telefon 66 90 19 41  /  97 09 32 17
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Saturday, January 09, 2010 1:17 AM
      Subject: [ancient_waterways_society] Eastern Massachusetts find

       

      I've just added a new folder named Eastern Massachusetts. In it are a
      couple of shots of a stone with a glyphs.

      It was found 20 years ago by a Metropolitan District Commission Park
      Ranger in suburban Boston, face down on the ground in a wooded
      conservation area. It is now owned by the ranger's son, who has been
      summarily dismissed by every museum he has contacted because of the lack
      of weathering on the glyph face.

      He's ready to give up on it and has asked me to offer suggestions. Any
      thoughts?

      --

      Dave Goudsward
      Lake Worth, FL
      http://ancientstone sites.com
      http://shadows- over.com

    • herbswoods
      They don t mean anything, but I had two dreams since posting about these hewn stones. In the first dream I was walking along Wisconsin Point at Superior,
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 10, 2010
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        They don't mean anything, but I had two dreams since posting about these "hewn" stones.

        In the first dream I was walking along Wisconsin Point at Superior, Wis. and as far as the eye could see out into the lake the bottom was filled with perfectly shaped "hewn" blocks of stone. The water was perfectly transparent and crystal-clear and the complex lakebed was a world unto itself.

        The 2nd dream was very strange, with native copper and a gift from the "spirit." There were also two Indian women in it, but nothing about hewn stones.

        Some force is apparently trying to tell me something. Too bad I don't believe in that stuff!

        --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, Dave Goudsward <dave@...> wrote:
        >
        > In January 1677, Father Chrestien le Clercq was traveling to visit
        > Miramichi near present-day Chatham when he became lost and was was
        > rescued by a passing Native. To his delight, the Mi'kmaqs of the area
        > already considered the cruciform a sacred symbol although they had not
        > been exposed to Catholicism. Giving them the name of Porte-Croix
        > (Cross-Bearers), le Clercq tried to discover the origins of their
        > veneration of the cross. Father le Clercq interviewed a 120-year old
        > member of the tribe who claimed to remember the first arrival of the
        > French, and that the veneration of the cross came from their ancestors,
        > long before the missionaries arrived.
        >
        > Arcadian historian William Ganong, in the foreword to his 1910
        > translation of le Clercq, tends to dismiss the matter by suggesting it
        > was either an artifact from a previous missionary visit or a stylized
        > bird in flight as a tribal totem.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > herbswoods wrote:
        > >
        > > Thanks for posting this.
        > >
        > > >From this quote I now recall that Carver took the
        > > Chippewa-St.Croix-Bois Brule river route down to Lake Superior at the
        > > western end of the lake, and then proceeded up the North Shore. So,
        > > what he saw and described as "hewn" stones underwater in Lake Superior
        > > must have been located somewhere between the mouth of the Bois Brule
        > > River and/or up along the North Shore.
        > >
        > > This would also have been one route used by ancient copper miners
        > > coming from the south on their way to Isle Royale.
        > >
        >
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