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Fwd: carp story

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  • Ted Sojka
    Begin forwarded message: Ancient Waterways Lookout! Coming to a river near you, another man made disaster, due to ignorance and mismanagement of natural
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 7, 2010
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      Begin forwarded message:
      Ancient Waterways Lookout!

      Coming to a river near you, another man made disaster, due to ignorance and mismanagement of natural systems.  The newspaper article tells the story.  An 83 pound Asian Carp was caught by a bow fisherman around a hundred miles up stream from the Mississippi, past five dams, in the center of the state.  I hope they close the Illinois canal before they invade the Great Lakes!


      These fish are now in Pool 8 at LaCrosse Wisconsin where it is crossed by Interstate 90.   .   An 83 pound one was bow fished near Waterloo, Iowa,  a hundred miles upstream from the Mississippi.  It is a serious enough problem that seven states have sued Illinois to close the 100 year old shipping canal that connects the great lakes to the Illinois River system.  Read the story for details in the Cedar Rapids Gazette today, Jan 7th.

      If you look closely  you will see a guy in a pontoon boat that stirred up all the commotion in the silver carp and big head carp.   They eat everything the native fish chain depend on, spawn four or five times a year,  as opposed to the native fish that only due it once.  These Asian carp spawn whenever there is high water!  


      Ted

      Begin forwarded message:


      Date: January 7, 2010 12:52:17 PM CST
      To: Ted Sojka <tedsojka@...>
      Subject: carp




    • Crispy
      If the fish has been seen as a full grown adult that far from the Mississippi, the Gt. Lakes are already infiltrated. Maybe they ll eat the zebra mussels!
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 13, 2010
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        If the fish has been seen as a full grown adult that far from the Mississippi, the Gt. Lakes are already infiltrated. Maybe they'll eat the zebra mussels! Closing the canal gates will be like barn doors long after the horse has escaped. We saw this happening 4 years ago on Funniest Home Vids with the things jumping into fishing boats. Why did no one take it serious then?

        On the philosophy "When handed lemons make lemonade"...
        I just saw a cooking show on cable. Well, ok, i get Sat TV, but anyhow...
        The Asian Carp is not the same kind of fish as the native American Carp we are familiar with. Ours is a bottom feeder exclusively, or nearly mostly. The bigger it gets, the more mouldy and musky it becomes. Conversely, the Asian Carp (being re-named as quick as possible by spin doctors as "Silver-Fin") starts life as a bottom feeder, cuz that's the easiest way to find something. But as they grow, the Silver Fin becomes an aggressive mid-water predator. If it moves and is smaller than its mouth, it gets sucked in. So as it gets bigger and bigger, it eats other swimming fish and sweet crustaceans.

        So as a potential resturant menu item, the big ones are actually competitive in taste to any other large food-fish on the boat. The prep is a bit different than others, you need to bleed the catch as soon as it is taken to lighten and blanch the flesh. [Much as you would drain any beef, pork, venison item upon dressing.]

        One steams the fish to where it can fall off the bones, then it can be used as fillets, fritters, drizzled in butter like seafood, grilled or broiled to brown; baked in glaze, flaked into lettuce or veggie salads, souped, dressed like tuna-salad for sandwiches or any other way fish is traditionally consumed. Shoot, it might even make good jerkey, with cajun, cheyenne and some sugar. It can form the protein base for 'mock crab' or other processed snack-meats.

        The way it breeds, it will be a poor-man's lobster, plentiful and affordable to all. We just have to get busy and eat it faster than it breeds, we'll be fine, ehh! Humans have eaten every other fish in the ocean to the point of endagerment and extinction, not to mention the whales. Harvest this instead and let the others recover. A thot.
        -crispy

        --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, Ted Sojka <tedsojka@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > Begin forwarded message:
        > Ancient Waterways Lookout!
        >
        > Coming to a river near you, another man made disaster, due to
        > ignorance and mismanagement of natural systems. The newspaper article
        > tells the story. An 83 pound Asian Carp was caught by a bow fisherman
        > around a hundred miles up stream from the Mississippi, past five dams,
        > in the center of the state. I hope they close the Illinois canal
        > before they invade the Great Lakes!
        >
        >
        > These fish are now in Pool 8 at LaCrosse Wisconsin where it is crossed
        > by Interstate 90. . An 83 pound one was bow fished near Waterloo,
        > Iowa, a hundred miles upstream from the Mississippi. It is a serious
        > enough problem that seven states have sued Illinois to close the 100
        > year old shipping canal that connects the great lakes to the Illinois
        > River system. Read the story for details in the Cedar Rapids Gazette
        > today, Jan 7th.
        >
        > If you look closely you will see a guy in a pontoon boat that stirred
        > up all the commotion in the silver carp and big head carp. They eat
        > everything the native fish chain depend on, spawn four or five times a
        > year, as opposed to the native fish that only due it once. These
        > Asian carp spawn whenever there is high water!
        >
        >
        > Ted
        >
        > Begin forwarded message:
        >
        > >
        > > Date: January 7, 2010 12:52:17 PM CST
        > > To: Ted Sojka <tedsojka@...>
        > > Subject: carp
        > >
        > > http://gazetteonline.com/top-story/2010/01/06/asian-carp-invasion-of-iowa-waterways-progresses
        >
      • charles bruns
        I ve heard poor man s lobster before, when they were talking about eelpout.  Ya, you smoke it enough and it don t taste too bad.   Especially if you have
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 14, 2010
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          I've heard 'poor man's lobster' before, when they were talking about eelpout.  'Ya, you smoke it enough and it don't taste too bad.'  Especially if you have been drinking Bartons Reserve or some other fine tipple.  The key came when you talked about 'cooking till it falls off the bone'.  Wayne Shelhon was suffering from hunger and poverty.  in the St. Louis Bay of Duluth harbor, right next to the sewage treatment plant, he caught a kind of yellow-brown, ulcerated sucker and baked it in my oven till it, 'fell of the bone'.  he looked at the stinking pile, dumped half a bottle of ketchup on it, and started shoveling it down.  i asked how he like it - as he was greatful and cleaning his plate, he replied, 'It's warm.'      chb

          --- On Wed, 1/13/10, Crispy <yacrispyubetcha@...> wrote:

          From: Crispy <yacrispyubetcha@...>
          Subject: [ancient_waterways_society] Re: Fwd: carp story
          To: ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Wednesday, January 13, 2010, 3:42 PM

           
          If the fish has been seen as a full grown adult that far from the Mississippi, the Gt. Lakes are already infiltrated. Maybe they'll eat the zebra mussels! Closing the canal gates will be like barn doors long after the horse has escaped. We saw this happening 4 years ago on Funniest Home Vids with the things jumping into fishing boats. Why did no one take it serious then?

          On the philosophy "When handed lemons make lemonade"...
          I just saw a cooking show on cable. Well, ok, i get Sat TV, but anyhow...
          The Asian Carp is not the same kind of fish as the native American Carp we are familiar with. Ours is a bottom feeder exclusively, or nearly mostly. The bigger it gets, the more mouldy and musky it becomes. Conversely, the Asian Carp (being re-named as quick as possible by spin doctors as "Silver-Fin" ) starts life as a bottom feeder, cuz that's the easiest way to find something. But as they grow, the Silver Fin becomes an aggressive mid-water predator. If it moves and is smaller than its mouth, it gets sucked in. So as it gets bigger and bigger, it eats other swimming fish and sweet crustaceans.

          So as a potential resturant menu item, the big ones are actually competitive in taste to any other large food-fish on the boat. The prep is a bit different than others, you need to bleed the catch as soon as it is taken to lighten and blanch the flesh. [Much as you would drain any beef, pork, venison item upon dressing.]

          One steams the fish to where it can fall off the bones, then it can be used as fillets, fritters, drizzled in butter like seafood, grilled or broiled to brown; baked in glaze, flaked into lettuce or veggie salads, souped, dressed like tuna-salad for sandwiches or any other way fish is traditionally consumed. Shoot, it might even make good jerkey, with cajun, cheyenne and some sugar. It can form the protein base for 'mock crab' or other processed snack-meats.

          The way it breeds, it will be a poor-man's lobster, plentiful and affordable to all. We just have to get busy and eat it faster than it breeds, we'll be fine, ehh! Humans have eaten every other fish in the ocean to the point of endagerment and extinction, not to mention the whales. Harvest this instead and let the others recover. A thot.
          -crispy

          --- In ancient_waterways_ society@yahoogro ups.com, Ted Sojka <tedsojka@.. .> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > Begin forwarded message:
          > Ancient Waterways Lookout!
          >
          > Coming to a river near you, another man made disaster, due to
          > ignorance and mismanagement of natural systems. The newspaper article
          > tells the story. An 83 pound Asian Carp was caught by a bow fisherman
          > around a hundred miles up stream from the Mississippi, past five dams,
          > in the center of the state. I hope they close the Illinois canal
          > before they invade the Great Lakes!
          >
          >
          > These fish are now in Pool 8 at LaCrosse Wisconsin where it is crossed
          > by Interstate 90. . An 83 pound one was bow fished near Waterloo,
          > Iowa, a hundred miles upstream from the Mississippi. It is a serious
          > enough problem that seven states have sued Illinois to close the 100
          > year old shipping canal that connects the great lakes to the Illinois
          > River system. Read the story for details in the Cedar Rapids Gazette
          > today, Jan 7th.
          >
          > If you look closely you will see a guy in a pontoon boat that stirred
          > up all the commotion in the silver carp and big head carp. They eat
          > everything the native fish chain depend on, spawn four or five times a
          > year, as opposed to the native fish that only due it once. These
          > Asian carp spawn whenever there is high water!
          >
          >
          > Ted
          >
          > Begin forwarded message:
          >
          > >
          > > Date: January 7, 2010 12:52:17 PM CST
          > > To: Ted Sojka <tedsojka@.. .>
          > > Subject: carp
          > >
          > > http://gazetteonlin e.com/top- story/2010/ 01/06/asian- carp-invasion- of-iowa-waterway s-progresses
          >


        • Vincent Barrows
          The Pardo Stone is an inscribed stone introduced According to:
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 15, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            The Pardo Stone is an inscribed stone introduced According to:
            http://www.knowitall.org/instantreplay/files/circle/Circle%20of%20Inheritance%20Teacher%20Guide.pdf

            A remarkable relic of Juan Pardo’s interior crossing was discovered in upstate South Carolina in
            June of 1935. A farmer plowing his field near Inman, about 12 miles from Spartanburg, upturned
            a large and well-preserved stone bearing peculiar marks and Roman numerals.
            Long before the white man’s arrival in this territory, these forests – in 1935, farmlands – were
            laced with Indian paths, crisscrossing and connecting neighboring tribes and towns. Most
            historians believe that Captain Pardo’s exploratory route took him across Spartanburg County,
            in the northwestern part of South Carolina, through Cherokee and Catawba lands. A known
            crossing point between the Cherokee and Catawba nations was located just a few miles south of
            the field in Inman, South Carolina, where the stone marker was found. The stone is now housed
            in the Spartanburg Museum.
            During the time of Pardo’s inland exploration, the fort at Santa Elena continued to grown, but
            not without difficulty and hardship. Disease epidemics broke out in the 1570’s, and there was
            trouble with the Indians near Santa Elena. Nonetheless, as the colony continued to grow,
            Menendez gradually transferred his headquarters from St. Augustine to Santa Elena. When
            Menendez’s wife and her attendants arrived in the New World, it was in Santa Elena that he
            settled them.
            After Menendez’s death in 1574, the new commander had trouble with both the settlers and the
            Indians. When the Indians attacked the fort in 1576, the settlers were forced to abandon it.
            Waiting in their vessels to depart, they watched the town and fort being burned by the Indians.

          • joe white
            O siyo Brothers, and Sisters, Is the Pardo Stone, on Page 17, Semitic Ogam? If so, what does it say in English that we can understand? Gah gey you e, Sitting
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 16, 2010
            • 0 Attachment
              
              O'siyo Brothers, and Sisters,
               
              Is the Pardo Stone, on Page 17, Semitic Ogam?  If so, what does it say in English that we can understand?
               
              Gah gey you e,
               
              Sitting Owl
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Friday, January 15, 2010 10:04 PM
              Subject: [ancient_waterways_society] pardo stone

               

              The Pardo Stone is an inscribed stone introduced According to:
              http://www.knowital l.org/instantrep lay/files/ circle/Circle% 20of%20Inheritan ce%20Teacher% 20Guide.pdf

              A remarkable relic of Juan Pardo’s interior crossing was discovered in upstate South Carolina in
              June of 1935. A farmer plowing his field near Inman, about 12 miles from Spartanburg, upturned
              a large and well-preserved stone bearing peculiar marks and Roman numerals.
              Long before the white man’s arrival in this territory, these forests – in 1935, farmlands – were
              laced with Indian paths, crisscrossing and connecting neighboring tribes and towns. Most
              historians believe that Captain Pardo’s exploratory route took him across Spartanburg County,
              in the northwestern part of South Carolina, through Cherokee and Catawba lands. A known
              crossing point between the Cherokee and Catawba nations was located just a few miles south of
              the field in Inman, South Carolina, where the stone marker was found. The stone is now housed
              in the Spartanburg Museum.
              During the time of Pardo’s inland exploration, the fort at Santa Elena continued to grown, but
              not without difficulty and hardship. Disease epidemics broke out in the 1570’s, and there was
              trouble with the Indians near Santa Elena. Nonetheless, as the colony continued to grow,
              Menendez gradually transferred his headquarters from St. Augustine to Santa Elena. When
              Menendez’s wife and her attendants arrived in the New World, it was in Santa Elena that he
              settled them.
              After Menendez’s death in 1574, the new commander had trouble with both the settlers and the
              Indians. When the Indians attacked the fort in 1576, the settlers were forced to abandon it.
              Waiting in their vessels to depart, they watched the town and fort being burned by the Indians.

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