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Re: [ancient_waterways_society] Update on Low Tablet

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  • Frode Th. Omdahl
    How nice it would be if USA could put in law what we have done in Norway: Any artefact found or dug up from the earth that is older than from 1536 AD,
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 4, 2009
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      How nice it would be if USA could put in law what we have done in Norway: Any artefact found or dug up from the earth that is  older than from 1536 AD, automatically belongs to the State.
       
       
      Frode
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Vince
      Sent: Wednesday, November 04, 2009 8:51 PM
      Subject: [ancient_waterways_society] Update on Low Tablet

       

      Museum Sued for Return of Rare Stone Tablet
      COLUMBUS, Ohio (CN) - A man unearthed a rare stone tablet in 1942 and loaned it to the Ohio Historical Society Museum, and the museum now refuses to give it back, Edward Low says in Franklin County Court. The sandstone plate is believed to have been engraved by the prehistoric Adena people between 700 B.C. to 400 A.D., according to the lawsuit.
      Low says he found the tablet while digging a play foxhole on a possible burial mound in Parkersburg, W. Va., when he was 12 years old. The item is engraved with two human faces in mirror image beneath a pair of raptorial bird heads. The tablet is allegedly associated with the Prehistoric Early Woodland Adena Culture of Ohio, Kentucky and West Virginia.
      In 1971, Low read an article about Dr. Raymond Baby, a museum archeologist, and decided to contact him about the tablet, the lawsuit claims.
      Low says Baby asked to borrow the tablet for research, but never returned it. The museum claims the tablet was a gift, though Low insists it was a loan.
      He demands the return of the tablet, plus compensatory damages.
      His attorneys are Joel Rovito and James Southern of Reynoldsburg.

      http://www.courthou senews.com/ 2009/03/24/ Museum_Sued_ for_Return_ of_Rare_Stone_ Tablet.htm

      http://www.courthou senews.com/ 2009/03/24/ Ohio%20Historica l%20Society. pdf

    • conner6343@sbcglobal.net
      Vince: I had a conversation with Baby in Columbus back in 1963 about Arlington Mallery s prehistoric iron furnaces. Baby suggested to me that I should study
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 7, 2009
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        Vince:
         
        I had a conversation with Baby in Columbus back in 1963 about Arlington Mallery's prehistoric iron furnaces.  Baby suggested to me that I should study the glass covered stones Mallery found in his furnaces and suggested these might be important to understanding how they worked.  He was right about this. 
         
        I don't believe Baby himself would have refused to return a borrowed artifact.   At issue here may be the Society's inability to find the artifact if indeed it is still in the Museum's collection.  The Society and the Museum are in weak financial circumstances these days, due in part to the current state of the U.S. economy.  In better days, school buses full of grade school students used to come to the museum here in Columbus from all over the state. 
         
        Just maintaining the museum's building here Columbus is a financial strain on the Society these days and many of the Society's sites in Ohio are closed now or existing on very tight budgets.  I assume the Society still has a warehouse here in Columbus, a place I visited in the late 1990s. 
         
        It is quite possible Society employees don't know where to find this artifact in their collection.  I am interested in how this affair will be settled. 
         
         
        William D. Conner
        Columbus, Ohio
         
        Author of "Iron Age America" a book
        soon to be published, and the web site
        "America's Mysterious Furnaces"
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Vince
        Sent: Wednesday, November 04, 2009 2:51 PM
        Subject: [ancient_waterways_society] Update on Low Tablet

         

        Museum Sued for Return of Rare Stone Tablet
        COLUMBUS, Ohio (CN) - A man unearthed a rare stone tablet in 1942 and loaned it to the Ohio Historical Society Museum, and the museum now refuses to give it back, Edward Low says in Franklin County Court. The sandstone plate is believed to have been engraved by the prehistoric Adena people between 700 B.C. to 400 A.D., according to the lawsuit.
        Low says he found the tablet while digging a play foxhole on a possible burial mound in Parkersburg, W. Va., when he was 12 years old. The item is engraved with two human faces in mirror image beneath a pair of raptorial bird heads. The tablet is allegedly associated with the Prehistoric Early Woodland Adena Culture of Ohio, Kentucky and West Virginia.
        In 1971, Low read an article about Dr. Raymond Baby, a museum archeologist, and decided to contact him about the tablet, the lawsuit claims.
        Low says Baby asked to borrow the tablet for research, but never returned it. The museum claims the tablet was a gift, though Low insists it was a loan.
        He demands the return of the tablet, plus compensatory damages.
        His attorneys are Joel Rovito and James Southern of Reynoldsburg.

        http://www.courthou senews.com/ 2009/03/24/ Museum_Sued_ for_Return_ of_Rare_Stone_ Tablet.htm

        http://www.courthou senews.com/ 2009/03/24/ Ohio%20Historica l%20Society. pdf

      • Susan
        William, Thank you for addtional information on the Ohio Historical Society in Columbus and insights on Dr. Raymond Baby in your response to Vince s update on
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 17, 2009
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          William,

          Thank you for addtional information on the Ohio Historical Society in Columbus and insights on Dr. Raymond Baby in your response to Vince's update on the Low Tablet.  Both of you, please keep us informed on the tablet and the status of the Ohio Historical Society.

          What a privilege it is to have research members from Ohio keeping us informed on that significant region of ancient N America.  William Connor in Columbus, Ross Hamilton updating us on the Great Serpent Mound in S. Ohio, and at least a couple other quieter members here from that neck of the woods.

          So many times historical societies and groups don't delve very far back into 'pre-history' but focus on 'Early American history' with at best, vague sweeping references to pre-European contact.  Hence my appreciation of professional and avocational diffusionist efforts to delve deeper into the ancient past inclusive of evidence of the many layers of cultures and many waves of seafarers, explorers, and migrating peoples.   I applaud this group's use of 'ancient global waterways' as pathways to such knowledge, though would like to see more direct intercommunication between and amongst members.  It is difficult with a group such as ours with members from diverse backgrounds and areas of interest.  A democratic group with no one person directing/hosting/moderating, though three of us watch for Spam, rudeness, and have not had to warn anyone.  
          One thing that may help bring people together is to tag either your own or favorite web sites under your salutation when you post...to futher identify your work, interests, etc.  Soon as my work eases back, I will send to each of the sixty-six members the list of those fifteen or twenty of you who have web sites, articles, references.  Or that I know do not mind my sharing those plus your regions of globe.  You may add/edit and return the information so that we have an updated email "Greetings to New Members" with partial list of members and links.    

          William,  I cannot find your most recent web site you listed within the body of one of your initial posts here.  Perhaps with your new book coming out soon, you might include the link under your salutation along with the helpful information you included.  I recall the following older web site "Iron Age America" which I signed up for a few years ago, wondered if the Table of Contents listed on the site is as it will be in your soon to be released book: http://ironageamerica.com/

          Newcomers here may not have seen William's earlier web site, which we posted long before William even became a member here, America's Mysterious Furnaces: http://www.iwaynet.net/~wdc/

          Just updating here.  I am working temporarily for the public health department doing H1N1 flu clinics on the road long days, sometimes well into the evenings, all day Saturdays now that the vaccine is finally starting to come into our state.  Thus, am only able to keep brief but regular watch over this site (for new members coming on Spamming)

          Thanks to all who post here, and my personal appreciation to those of you who fine time to help welcome/introduce newcomers.  And those here who are noncompetitively secure enough to warmly respond to and encourage the efforts of others here.   To me, the better each of you does, the greater the synergy we and beyond our group do in our endeavors and global outreach.  Adds to the greater depth, breadth, scientific and humanitarian wisdom in our personal lives and beyond our borders and boundaries of thinking.   Susan


          --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, <conner6343@...> wrote:
          >
          > Vince:
          >
          > I had a conversation with Baby in Columbus back in 1963 about Arlington Mallery's prehistoric iron furnaces. Baby suggested to me that I should study the glass covered stones Mallery found in his furnaces and suggested these might be important to understanding how they worked. He was right about this.
          >
          > I don't believe Baby himself would have refused to return a borrowed artifact. At issue here may be the Society's inability to find the artifact if indeed it is still in the Museum's collection. The Society and the Museum are in weak financial circumstances these days, due in part to the current state of the U.S. economy. In better days, school buses full of grade school students used to come to the museum here in Columbus from all over the state.
          >
          > Just maintaining the museum's building here Columbus is a financial strain on the Society these days and many of the Society's sites in Ohio are closed now or existing on very tight budgets. I assume the Society still has a warehouse here in Columbus, a place I visited in the late 1990s.
          >
          > It is quite possible Society employees don't know where to find this artifact in their collection. I am interested in how this affair will be settled.
          >
          >
          > William D. Conner
          > Columbus, Ohio
          >
          > Author of "Iron Age America" a book
          > soon to be published, and the web site
          > "America's Mysterious Furnaces"
          >
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: Vince
          > To: ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Wednesday, November 04, 2009 2:51 PM
          > Subject: [ancient_waterways_society] Update on Low Tablet
          >
          >
          > Museum Sued for Return of Rare Stone Tablet
          > COLUMBUS, Ohio (CN) - A man unearthed a rare stone tablet in 1942 and loaned it to the Ohio Historical Society Museum, and the museum now refuses to give it back, Edward Low says in Franklin County Court. The sandstone plate is believed to have been engraved by the prehistoric Adena people between 700 B.C. to 400 A.D., according to the lawsuit.
          > Low says he found the tablet while digging a play foxhole on a possible burial mound in Parkersburg, W. Va., when he was 12 years old. The item is engraved with two human faces in mirror image beneath a pair of raptorial bird heads. The tablet is allegedly associated with the Prehistoric Early Woodland Adena Culture of Ohio, Kentucky and West Virginia.
          > In 1971, Low read an article about Dr. Raymond Baby, a museum archeologist, and decided to contact him about the tablet, the lawsuit claims.
          > Low says Baby asked to borrow the tablet for research, but never returned it. The museum claims the tablet was a gift, though Low insists it was a loan.
          > He demands the return of the tablet, plus compensatory damages.
          > His attorneys are Joel Rovito and James Southern of Reynoldsburg.
          >
          > http://www.courthousenews.com/2009/03/24/Museum_Sued_for_Return_of_Rare_Stone_Tablet.htm
          >
          > http://www.courthousenews.com/2009/03/24/Ohio%20Historical%20Society.pdf
          >
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