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Re: [ancient_waterways_society] Cherokee & Semitic Ogam

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  • Ted Sojka
    My Sac and Fox friends tell me, (Mesqawukie of Iowa), that they also use the turkey track symbol. They know they are in friendly territory when they see this
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 13, 2009
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      My Sac and Fox friends tell me, (Mesqawukie of Iowa), that they also use the turkey track symbol.   They know they are in friendly territory when they see this sign.  ted   I have seen it cut into rock shelter walls, and cave walls.

       
      On Aug 13, 2009, at 8:10 AM, joe white wrote:


      O'siyo Brothers, and Sisters,
       
      For your Information.
       
      It is a part of the Cherokee Historical Record that we used a symbol
      to mark the trails on the trees to point to the end of the destination.
      Marking the Trail itself.
       
      Whiteman called it a turkey track.
       
      In actuality it is the (tau) in Semitic Ogam.  We have had some reports
      of Cherokee visiting our museum that has seen these symbols, and
      stories in the oral family history of remembering them.
       
      Alpha-begining   Omega-end
      Alpha-begining     Tau-end
       
      This ancient symbol has been used up to recent times.
      We have seen some artifacts with this (tau) that came
      from Cherokee Indian Territory here in middle Tennessee
      and northern Alabama.
       
      Gah gey you e,
       
      Sitting Owl


    • Chris Patenaude
      13th cent BCE the turkeytrack mark was Kaph in Proto-Canaanite. By 1000 BCE the Phoenicians were also using it for Kaph. In that mode, it represents the
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 14, 2009
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        13th cent BCE the "turkeytrack" mark was Kaph in Proto-Canaanite. By 1000 BCE the Phoenicians were also using it for Kaph. In that mode, it represents the hollow of the hand, or palm. Gematric values of 20 as one symbol, 500 as the 'terminal'.  However, from 40,000BP Australia to many inscriptions being found in the Great Basin semitics, it is also used as Chet, meaning "fence" (border, boundary) likely a territorial marker; with the gematric value of 8.
         
        -chris

        --- On Thu, 8/13/09, Ted Sojka <tedsojka@...> wrote:

        From: Ted Sojka <tedsojka@...>
        Subject: Re: [ancient_waterways_society] Cherokee & Semitic Ogam
        To: ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thursday, August 13, 2009, 10:16 AM



        My Sac and Fox friends tell me, (Mesqawukie of Iowa), that they also use the turkey track symbol.   They know they are in friendly territory when they see this sign.  ted   I have seen it cut into rock shelter walls, and cave walls.

         
        On Aug 13, 2009, at 8:10 AM, joe white wrote:


        O'siyo Brothers, and Sisters,
         
        For your Information.
         
        It is a part of the Cherokee Historical Record that we used a symbol
        to mark the trails on the trees to point to the end of the destination.
        Marking the Trail itself.
         
        Whiteman called it a turkey track.
         
        In actuality it is the (tau) in Semitic Ogam.  We have had some reports
        of Cherokee visiting our museum that has seen these symbols, and
        stories in the oral family history of remembering them.
         
        Alpha-begining   Omega-end
        Alpha-begining     Tau-end
         
        This ancient symbol has been used up to recent times.
        We have seen some artifacts with this (tau) that came
        from Cherokee Indian Territory here in middle Tennessee
        and northern Alabama.
         
        Gah gey you e,
         
        Sitting Owl





      • joe white
        Very interesting. Why are the Cherokee still using it today? Gah gey you e, Sitting Owl ... From: Chris Patenaude To:
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 14, 2009
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          Very interesting.  Why are the Cherokee still using it today?
           
          Gah gey you e,
           
          Sitting Owl
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Friday, August 14, 2009 1:55 PM
          Subject: Re: [ancient_waterways_society] Cherokee & Semitic Ogam

           





          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.
          13th cent BCE the "turkeytrack" mark was Kaph in Proto-Canaanite. By 1000 BCE the Phoenicians were also using it for Kaph. In that mode, it represents the hollow of the hand, or palm. Gematric values of 20 as one symbol, 500 as the 'terminal'.  However, from 40,000BP Australia to many inscriptions being found in the Great Basin semitics, it is also used as Chet, meaning "fence" (border, boundary) likely a territorial marker; with the gematric value of 8.
           
          -chris

          --- On Thu, 8/13/09, Ted Sojka <tedsojka@mchsi. com> wrote:

          From: Ted Sojka <tedsojka@mchsi. com>
          Subject: Re: [ancient_waterways_ society] Cherokee & Semitic Ogam
          To: ancient_waterways_ society@yahoogro ups.com
          Date: Thursday, August 13, 2009, 10:16 AM



          My Sac and Fox friends tell me, (Mesqawukie of Iowa), that they also use the turkey track symbol.   They know they are in friendly territory when they see this sign.  ted   I have seen it cut into rock shelter walls, and cave walls.


          On Aug 13, 2009, at 8:10 AM, joe white wrote:


          O'siyo Brothers, and Sisters,
           
          For your Information.
           
          It is a part of the Cherokee Historical Record that we used a symbol
          to mark the trails on the trees to point to the end of the destination.
          Marking the Trail itself.
           
          Whiteman called it a turkey track.
           
          In actuality it is the (tau) in Semitic Ogam.  We have had some reports
          of Cherokee visiting our museum that has seen these symbols, and
          stories in the oral family history of remembering them.
           
          Alpha-begining   Omega-end
          Alpha-begining     Tau-end
           
          This ancient symbol has been used up to recent times.
          We have seen some artifacts with this (tau) that came
          from Cherokee Indian Territory here in middle Tennessee
          and northern Alabama.
           
          Gah gey you e,
           
          Sitting Owl