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  • joe white
    O siyo Brothers, and Sisters, Below is a Thunderbird, and its feathers apear to possibly be the language of Ogam. If so, can this message be interpreted? Gah
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 17, 2009
      O'siyo Brothers, and Sisters,
       
      Below is a Thunderbird, and its feathers apear to possibly
      be the language of Ogam.  If so, can this message be interpreted?
       
      Gah gey you e,
       
      Sitting Owl
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Ted Sojka
      Sent: Friday, July 17, 2009 12:14 AM
      Subject: [ancient_waterways_society] Hello Joe and Bill "Fishtrap"


      Ted's drawing of a site found in Iowa.


       

      Below some earlier literature on cave walls near Red Wing Minnesota.   Notice the Bull Shark which it is assumed was
      in this area way upstream from Salt Water near lake Pepin on the Mississippi River, a natural lake formed by backed up
      gravel bars at the confluence of the Chippewa River.

      IMG_6633


       



      Rattlesnakes by the hundreds came to these cliff caves during the Spring to mate and due to the bounty on them in the 
      last hundred years, are quite rare.  Efforts are made now to let them reproduce in habitats to allow them to control the 
      rabbit and mouse populations which are over running the environment.  Snapping Turtles too were over hunted and though I see 
      a large one once in awhile, only the painted turtles seem to be in numbers today.


       

      Most of the creeks famous for hundreds of turtles used for soup and meat, are not producing the numbers of years gone
      by.  Some of this may be due to the straightening of creeks, drainage tile installation on thousands of acres, and increased
      silting of normally gravel bottoms which lessens the food supply of small fish.   

      This area was a trading place for bison shoulder blades for hoes to be traded with those from the East in Wisconsin's 
      woods and lowlands, for deer hides, quartzite for blades that are calcified limestone.  Holds a point better and is more 
      durable than flint.


       

      Ted Sojka
      Native Earthworks Preservation
      Art Educators of Iowa
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