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Re: [ancient_waterways_society] --- MALTA = Cart ruts in stone

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  • TRAYLOROO
    To All:   MAP, MALTA and GOZO - click on image to enlarge. For more reading, search for: RUTS, GOZO MALTA           Click here for excellent site
    Message 1 of 3 , May 2, 2009
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      To All:
       
      MAP, MALTA and GOZO - click on image to enlarge. For more reading, search for: RUTS, GOZO MALTA        
       
      Click here for excellent site for Gozo. I visited this island also; ten days on the two islands. Yes:  I would go again.
      The Crusaders occupied Malta, and the Romans, and ... many other. The Roman ships used it for a lay-over going to-from southern Italy and northern Africa.  The Crusaders had a huge hospital and watch towers around the island.
       
      The ruts on Malta are about as orderly as fresh cooked spaghetti in a bowl. Not very organized.  They go in all different directions which seems not to be toward the stars. Their length is from a few feet to fifty feet or so .... as I saw them. They probably pre-date the wheel on these islands. Malta human occupation iaboutjt 5,000 BCE.  
       
      Today thequarryry their unique limestone, it is one piece, creamy color when freshly harvested, and soft for sculpting.  As it dries, it hardens. 
       
      They have their own school of medicine, and a hospital that is superior to any I have seen in America. They are multi-lingual, and a member of the EUFor more facts, CLICK ME.
       
      Bon voyage,
       
      Cal Traylor
       
      ===========================================
      From: minnesotastan <minnesotastan@...>
      Subject: [ancient_waterways_society] Cart ruts in stone
      To: ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Saturday, May 2, 2009, 2:27 PM

      I had not previously been aware that the island of Malta is criss-crossed with cart ruts that go deep (several feet) into the stone.  Apparently there have been arguments for years as to what the implications are.  This week there's an article published in the U.K. which documents the mechanism of formation of the ruts :

      Professor Mottershead' s team came up with a design of a cart to fit the field evidence, estimated its weight and calculated the stresses involved.

      They discovered that in some places the rock was so soft that after heavy rain a single passage of a cart could cause the rock to fail.

      Professor Mottershead said: 'The ruts have been studied and talked about for centuries and though it is obvious they are related to vehicles nobody understood how they were made or even when.

      'The underlying rock in Malta is weak and when it's wet it loses about 80 per cent of its strength.


      It's amazing to me that a cart (even a heavy one) can leave a trail in rock in just one passage!  This has a variety of implications for those interested in rock features, sacred rocks, petroglyphs etc.

      Here are some photos from Google Images showing the ruts .

      Stan
    • TRAYLOROO
      Fore word:  My wife and I joined an Elderhostel in Malta.  We paid for the land portion, using accumulated air-miles for the air portion.  The Elderhostel
      Message 2 of 3 , May 2, 2009
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        Fore word:  My wife and I joined an Elderhostel in Malta.  We paid for the land portion, using accumulated air-miles for the air portion.  The Elderhostel tour included a day-trip to Gozo, using a ferry. See the red dotted lines on the map linked below.  On Gozo they have a new church with a reputation for healing, like Lourdes. She stepped off a platform and found the stone floor to be stronger than her pelvis, which cracked.  Pelvis, not floor.  She spent three days in a hospital, the best ever.  Malta does have low quality hospitals, but this was new and pretty and roomy.  The pretty young nurse from Scotland served her room, nurse with a unique little hat about the size of tea cup; have no idea how it stayed in place. 
         
        Readers of the Bible may know about Paul's shipwreck. Then and now, it is occupied only a few weeks at a time.
         
         

        To All:
         
        MAP, MALTA and GOZO - click on image to enlarge. For more reading, search for: RUTS, GOZO MALTA        
         
        Click here for excellent site for Gozo. I visited this island also; ten days on the two islands. Yes:  I would go again.
        The Crusaders occupied Malta, and the Romans, and ... many other. The Roman ships used it for a lay-over going to-from southern Italy and northern Africa.  The Crusaders had a huge hospital and watch towers around the island.
         
        The ruts on Malta are about as orderly as fresh cooked spaghetti in a bowl. Not very organized.  They go in all different directions which seems not to be toward the stars. Their length is from a few feet to fifty feet or so .... as I saw them. They probably pre-date the wheel on these islands. Malta human occupation iaboutjt 5,000 BCE.  
         
        Today thequarryry their unique limestone, it is one piece, creamy color when freshly harvested, and soft for sculpting.  As it dries, it hardens. 
         
        They have their own school of medicine, and a hospital that is superior to any I have seen in America. They are multi-lingual, and a member of the EUFor more facts, CLICK ME.
         
        Bon voyage,
         
        Cal Traylor
         
        ===========================================
        From: minnesotastan <minnesotastan@...>
        Subject: [ancient_waterways_society] Cart ruts in stone
        To: ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Saturday, May 2, 2009, 2:27 PM

        I had not previously been aware that the island of Malta is criss-crossed with cart ruts that go deep (several feet) into the stone.  Apparently there have been arguments for years as to what the implications are.  This week there's an article published in the U.K. which documents the mechanism of formation of the ruts :

        Professor Mottershead' s team came up with a design of a cart to fit the field evidence, estimated its weight and calculated the stresses involved.

        They discovered that in some places the rock was so soft that after heavy rain a single passage of a cart could cause the rock to fail.

        Professor Mottershead said: 'The ruts have been studied and talked about for centuries and though it is obvious they are related to vehicles nobody understood how they were made or even when.

        'The underlying rock in Malta is weak and when it's wet it loses about 80 per cent of its strength.


        It's amazing to me that a cart (even a heavy one) can leave a trail in rock in just one passage!  This has a variety of implications for those interested in rock features, sacred rocks, petroglyphs etc.

        Here are some photos from Google Images showing the ruts .

        Stan
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