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Re: NEW MEMBER SAYS - HELLO

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  • Susan
    All, My appreciation to Ted, Frode, Martin, Stan and others for personally welcoming new folks, as we would around our homes, a fire, Lodge. In his
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 27 12:17 PM
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      All,
      My appreciation to Ted, Frode, Martin, Stan and others for personally welcoming new folks,  as we would around our homes, a fire, Lodge.  In his introductory posts, host MinnesotaStan referred to this group as an "on-line meetingplace".  When greeting newcomers and supporting the work of other members and groups,  you are helping engage in part of the role of 'co-hosting.  Members carrying the ball, if and as each is able, is what truly makes membership within our unique association representative and inclusive.
       
      Vince, your work is so carefully researched and comprehensive it needs to be published in a book or two, as Rydholm did within his lifetime and I wish Marion Dahm had,   Wouldn't he., and also Barry Fell and Henrietta Mertz who did publish extensively, be pleased with research being done collaboratively among so many of you today.  How they would enjoy some of these online conversations and web sites!
       
      Thank you for signing on, Cal. Nearly ninety years old....I had no idea!
      You mentioned Elderhostel which I think you once told me you had been on a trip with your wife along Lake Superior and visited the Rydolms.  The AAPS web site will ever pay tribute to Fred Rydholm, in their web site and work.
       
      I believe it was during the early 1990's at one of a couple of conferences I helped Ancient American staff with in Prova and Salt Lake City that I met Cal.  My regrets for not going on an impromptu field trip Cal helped drum up during the conference to view petroglyphs on remote, private property.  Or not changing flight plans when Ancient American staff were invited into the archives at Salt Lake City to see the stored copper plates, Michigan tablets and other artifacts.  I corresponded closely and learned much from you, Cal, we lost touch for many years.  And now your are among us here....  
       
      I briefly googled when Cal mentioned a museum,  found a couple of references he won't mind my further introducing him and his Rio Grande waterways area.
       
      Some besides Ted in finding non conflicting kinship within Nature, Art, Sacred surveying, the Diffusionist Sciences, and oral histories/Storytelling  may appreciate this Talking Sticks Institute link w/photo of artists sitting with Cal discussing a museum: 
       
      Twice past president of the Doña Ana County Historical Society near his home in New Mexico.  http://www.donaanacountyhistsoc.org/
       

      I hope Cal and some of you here have a room of your own which acts as your research lab, maybe the start of a 'museum' to share and show collecitons,  photos, DVD's, coffeepot :) tc. when interested travelers stop to visit.  Doc Johson in my hometown had such a workshop and museum in his basement where writer David Hoffman and I took many groups over the years.  Johnson's son, David (a ember here) incorporated hia dad's work into his own collection at his new place in Minnesota.  As was the long tradition of his father in opening his doors to school children, universities, and others, David is making his colleciton available to visitors by appointment.  I need to try to get Scott Wolter, Stan, Jeff Bennett, Chris, Judi, Char Bruns and others together over there for a one day gathering centered around a visit to David Johnson's extensive ancient 'copperculture' and historic mining collection: http://copperculture.homestead.com/
       
      Ancient Waterways Society now has more than fifty members and over 1000 posts in the Archives.
      Thank you to all for helping make this an open-mindedly scientific group that spans countless millinnea and many academic and avocational avenues of inquiry and expertise, as we continue our work with many related associations  across global, intercontinental waterways.  In this sense we are not merely "studying", but actively engaged in living some of the lost legacies and wisdoms from successful past peoples.... passing the 'talking stick' as we continue to search for wisdom which transcends the tests of time.  Which many wise ones knew and know are bringing us into times of much needed, maybe unfathomable change.
      Susan

      Note: I've mentioned this before, but if anyone is finding Individual Emails excessive, you may go into " Members" at left, scroll to your name to change your Email Delivery column to Individual Emails, Daily Digest (all AWS posts go into one daily email), Special Notices, or No Email.  If you sign up for Special Notices (we have not yet sent any) or No Emails, you will need to check the site from the YahooGroups home page I posted recently or Favorites. 

        --- In ancient_waterways_society@yahoogroups.com, "trayloroo" <trayloroo@...> wrote:

      >
      > Susan asked me to post something. For starters, she might know this story:
      >
      > We first met at a diffusionist conference in Salt Lake City, July 4 weekend. Even at that conference a local lady from the hills came to me (why me?) and showed in her palm about five small coins she had found in a creek, northerly from Salt Lake. They obviously were foreign; even pre Columbian no doubt. I forwarded her to another person with whom she consulted. I wonder if any one has the rest of that story?
      >
      >
      >
      > I do not have a bio posted on Yahoo. However, I became "enlightened" at an Elderhostel in Quebec c1880. One of the series of lectures listed in the catalog that seemed threatening, something not interesting was -- History of Languages, by two Ph.Ds. But, Quebec at a remote little hotel north of Vermont, and fall weather and fall colors, and the price ... all that enticed us as a change from southern New Mexico.
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      >
      > Being a casual arm-chair historian, living in the land not of Lincoln, but of Indians, I was mildly un impressed with our too-neat a history of their origin. Their appearances and diverse languages seemed to suggest not a common ancestry. But, I let it be.
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      >
      > However, in Quebec at the first lecture ... my hair stood on end and I alerted, sat upright. Of course these speakers were correct: Different origins in different centuries. Barry Fell's books were quoted frequently.
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      > Later at home I bought his books. Talked by telephone with Fell several times. He lived on Point Loma, part of San Diego. In his patio he had an area paved with fired clay bricks, and in some of those bricks were the imprints of a dog. That damn-dog had walked across those bricks when wet. The brick workers wanted those tracks down and out of sight... Barry wanted them up to be seen. He spoke of those dog tracks in bricks as forever crossing his patio ... That was my kind of man. He published the valuable "Occasional Papers." He is dead now, and unfortunately he did not have an organization to continue with his collections and work. I wonder what happened to the bricks with dog prints?
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      >
      > Ib many places in the Americas there is evidence of visitors from all parts of the world to here ... long before Columbus. And, evidence over-there too, like cocaine in Egyptian mummies. Try that in your search window. Those of you near Virginia know about the Chincoteague Pony ... which I argue was deposited by the Vikings.
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      > I am now near age 90 ... I too will pass the torch ..... If you are in San Diego, maybe you can that yard with dog prints .... (My grandfather help survey a farm on Coronado Island for subdividing ...)
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      > It is said your mind is like a parachute, it works better if it is open .... keep an open mind ...
      >
      > Cal Traylor
      >
      > Now I am working at establishing a museum on local Western history, and the history of Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid ... and such people that lived in my neighborhood.
      >
      > OK Susan, may I quit now?
      >

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