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CFP, Contextual and Interdisciplinary Numismatics

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  • archnathan
    Contextual Numismatics: New Perspectives and Interdisciplinary Methodologies AIA Meeting, Jan. 2009, Philadelphia, PA. This panel seeks papers that expound
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 13, 2008
      Contextual Numismatics: New Perspectives and Interdisciplinary
      Methodologies

      AIA Meeting, Jan. 2009, Philadelphia, PA.

      This panel seeks papers that expound innovative and dynamic approaches
      to the contextual study of ancient coins within an interdisciplinary
      framework. For centuries numismatic objects have been intensely
      examined by specialists in the field with little attention to broader
      questions apart from those inherent to the objects themselves. Coins
      have often been reduced to mere aesthetic objects or chronological
      references divorced from their original contexts in which they were
      once embedded. Even modern scholarship often neglects the countless
      individual dimensions of an ancient object (functional, social,
      historical, political, personal, etc.). However, a multidisciplinary
      treatment of these elements is necessary for a better understanding of
      their contemporary contexts. In the study of ancient art and culture,
      for example, Tonio Hölscher and Peter Stewart have successfully
      applied such approaches. Unlike most art objects, however, coins also
      have an equally strong practical and functional quality, which must be
      investigated in conjunction with their other dimensions and within the
      wider context of material culture. Therefore, the numismatist must
      develop proper methodologies that address these factors suitably.
      What can critical study of archaeologically recovered coin finds tell
      us about the immaterial concerns about their use and meaning for their
      contemporary consumers, and can we answer these questions with any
      degree of certainty? Clearly there is an important semantic dimension
      to the designs on ancient coins, but how does attention to context and
      other disciplines augment our understanding of intent and reception?
      How can methodologies from cultural anthropology, psychology, and
      sociology be applied to advance new theoretical approaches to
      numismatics? These are but a few of the myriad questions one might
      ask of the material.

      Please email abstracts to Nathan Elkins (NTElkins@...) and
      Stefan Krmnicek (s.krmnicek@...-frankfurt.de) by June 30, 2008.
      Abstracts should not exceed 250 words and must adhere to the AIA
      Abstract Submission Guidelines:
      http://archaeological.org/pdfs/annualconference/AIA_Style_Guidelines.pdf.
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