Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [americancomm] What Earl Capps said

Expand Messages
  • Dale Cyphert
    Art, The thread has now split into two quite different issues. a) [Tom s point] is that the PhD ITSELF is an end unto its own, independent of the teaching
    Message 1 of 11 , Oct 12, 2009
      Art,
      The thread has now split into two quite different issues.

      a) [Tom's point] is that the PhD ITSELF is an end unto its own,
      independent of the teaching responsibilities. Even now, in some of the
      highest ivory towers, the research and teaching functions are only
      tenuously related. The question at that point is actually whether a PhD
      holding researcher ought to be required to teach at all; many would
      argue that a full professor ought only mentor students in his or her own
      PhD program.

      b) [the original thread] is really about whether or not one can teach
      without a PhD. This is certainly possible in all sorts of institutions:
      community colleges, business organizations, and for-profit schools among
      them. Whether or not those are full-time jobs, well-paying jobs, or
      even pleasant jobs has everything to do with the "commoditization" of
      education, not the PhD degree.

      When an institution reserves its very few full-time, permanent,
      benefits-paying teaching slots for PhDs, those who might have formerly
      snagged such a job with a MA, MBA, or MFA are miffed.

      BUT, those who thought a PhD would get them a research gig and discover
      they can find only jobs where they must teach three or four courses a
      semester on top of maintaining that research productivity are equally
      miffed. (Or, they discover that in some fields, communication among
      them, PhD degrees are being granted at a rate that far exceeds the
      number of university openings. The opposite is going on in Finance and
      Accounting; if the degree is just a ticket to get a job, get a PhD in
      either of those fields!!)

      The reality is that the whole face of education is changing, and
      regardless of where you are on the academic food chain, there is miffdom
      to deal with.

      dale



      Dale Cyphert, Ph.D.
      Associate Professor
      Department of Management
      University of Northern Iowa
      1227 W.27th Street
      Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0125
      (319) 273-6150
      dale.cyphert@...

      Createcom Lynch wrote:
      >
      >
      > My concern with Thomas' statement, which I fully agree with, is that
      > doctorates are becoming required to teach! The two professions are
      > joined and teaching in and of itself is a profession, and a calling. How
      > does one enter full time community college or four year teaching schools
      > with the old and strict definition of what a doctorate is as these
      > schools increasingly use doctorate levels as other employers might high
      > school diplomas or BA's?
      >
      > Budget cuts, the transience of those seeking work, undercutting each
      > other on pay and increasing age, sex and other discrimination due to the
      > diversity of applications have turned the teaching college on its head.
      >
      > Accreditation races and competitiveness area also part of the cause.
      >
      > My personal Ax. I was teaching full time equivalent until cuts in
      > January 2008, designed simply to take people off the state retirement
      > and insurance rolls. Those cuts were cemented in 2009 with even deeper
      > budget cuts. Yet adjuncts move here from both coats and other countries
      > just to teach two sections at a community college.
      >
      > What future for those who wish to teach college full time? Particularly
      > older and "second profession" who did not do the academic traditional
      > route that the hooded universe seems to invoke.
      >
      >
      > -Art Lynch
      >
      >
      > On Oct 12, 2009, at 3:17 AM, Thomas Duncanson wrote:
      >
      >>
      >>
      >> I'm away for the semester, and just dipped into this discussion, by
      >> opening the amazing "Earl Capps" here in my local internet cafe.
      >>
      >> This time, Earl, I could hardly disagree more. The doctorate is not a
      >> game. It is deepening inquiry, and a commitment to a life time of
      >> deepening inquiry. Those books and journals on the book shelf are the
      >> advancement of human knowledge. Most of us who are tenured university
      >> faculty are open to consider all applicants for full and part-time
      >> positions, including second career seekers. However, the
      >> professoriate isn't so much a career as a life. It informs everything
      >> from the way you read your morning newspaper to your dreams when you
      >> sleep. It is one of the TRUE professions, wherein one is expected to
      >> operate with independent judgment and to endlessly initiate your own
      >> activities in teaching, research, and service. It is NOT an elaborate
      >> and expensive vehicle to deliver a fixed "curriculum." Almost none of
      >> us are paid what we are worth, and many of us are drastically
      >> underpaid. It isn't about what you need or what I need to have a
      >> certain style of life. And it isn't a venue for you as a bright
      >> person to be paid to have interesting and mostly pleasant interactions
      >> with promising young people. It isn't about you and me at all, in
      >> that sense. It is about our species knowing, representing, and as far
      >> as we are able mastering-- the universe. It is the "university," and
      >> the only institution in society that dares to carry this name.
      >>
      >> One can easily denigrate the hard work and constant interaction of
      >> university professors as "politics" or "networking" or "ass kissing"
      >> or whatever. It is easy to cite bad examples of failure and
      >> cynicism. But what happens when you have the audacity to look at the
      >> university and the feverish activity and endless ambition of its core
      >> members-- the faculty-- through the vantage of the actual long term
      >> ideals of the place?
      >>
      >> In a couple of weeks I am going to Bologna, and when I am there I am
      >> going to stop in and have a look around the University-- the first.
      >> When I read about the early years of the university, it always says
      >> that there were before "cathedral schools" in some locations, training
      >> priests, but that by the tenth century there was such excitement about
      >> what they were learning, what they were discovering, that the
      >> cathedral schools could not contain it. Could not contain it! And so
      >> they formed the first University at Bologna, and then at Paris, and so on.
      >>
      >> Do you have so much excitement about learning you would found the
      >> university if it did not already exist? Then you are the person I
      >> want to hire, and we'll sort out the degrees and so forth as it goes.
      >>
      >> MUCH of the activity of this list in recent years has concerned
      >> various short cuts to and around the university. But it is all
      >> predicated on this weird double think-- both great respect for,
      >> admiration of-- the university and jealousy of the privileges it
      >> maintains, and at the same time denigrating contempt for the
      >> instituion. The university is usually very clear about what it
      >> wants. It demands excellence in inquiry. If it didn't, would you
      >> still admire it? Try this thought experiment: a high school for
      >> somewhat older students with a really big football stadium? I'm not
      >> interested.
      >>
      >> Tom
      >>
      >> Tom Duncanson
      >> Millikin University
      >> tduncanson@... <mailto:tduncanson@...>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> >>> "Earl Capps" 10/11/09 12:06 PM >>>
      >>
      >>
      >> Networking and being known in the field is sometimes dismissed as
      >> ?politics?, but sometimes it?s essential. I?ve seen some live ones
      >> end up in teaching positions (fortunately, they usually didn?t last
      >> long). It?s really hard to tell who you?re dealing with unless you
      >> know them, or know someone who is familiar with them.
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> In a couple of cases, I?m surprised the institutions didn?t get hit by
      >> a lawsuit. Not that I thought they were responsible, but even if the
      >> lawsuit was thrown out, the cost of defending and the adverse
      >> publicity those individuals could have created if the right person had
      >> gone to the news media is something to think about.
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> In order to get my adjunct teaching slot, I had to really overkill. I
      >> was a very active student in my Master?s program with a lot of
      >> professional experience. I was the student who went to the
      >> conferences, took any chance to do guest lecturer stints, etc.
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> Is all that worth it for a career in teaching? Not with what you get
      >> paid if you have a Master?s and are teaching as an adjunct. Do I
      >> think a lot of it is necessary? I sure do. You can?t put someone in
      >> a position of trust and responsibility like that without knowing what
      >> they bring to the table.
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> People with Masters? degrees are, relative to the teaching needs of
      >> most colleges and universities, a dime a dozen. Is it fair that
      >> someone with an MA/MS and lots of career experience can?t get into a
      >> permanent position in academia? Not really. If my college offered me
      >> a chance to change careers and become some sort of ?senior
      >> instructor?, paid less than tenure-track professors, but enough to pay
      >> my bills, I might consider it.
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> Academia really handicaps itself by presuming that the only people
      >> worth keeping around are those who play ?the game? of having a
      >> doctorate and getting published. There are a lot of us who have
      >> plenty to offer who would love to spend our retirements on campus or
      >> make a second career of teaching, if we could get enough to pay our bills.
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> -earlcapps
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> *From:* americancomm@yahoogroups.com
      >> [mailto:americancomm@yahoogroups.com] *On Behalf Of *Melanie Salome
      >> *Sent:* Sunday, October 11, 2009 12:39 PM
      >> *To:* American Communication Association
      >> *Subject:* [americancomm] Obtaining a Teaching Position
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> Hi All,
      >>
      >> I want to thank you for your responses. They are both insightful and
      >> helpful.
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> We consider this time in our lives a great opportunity to actually
      >> pursue what we want to do. We were not happy in the financial
      >> services industry and this layoff was just another sign that we should
      >> be pursuing our dreams. We are in our mid 40's so it is a good time
      >> to consider a new career path and make positive changes.
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> If we move west, there is no risk of my husband not finishing his
      >> Doctorate because his program is primarily online at the University of
      >> Maryland. They have 3 residencies on campus throughout the year but
      >> the rest is online, so he will be finishing by the end of 2010. As
      >> for me, my search is for an adjunct position right now or perhaps in a
      >> community/junior college setting. My goal is to pursue my PhD once my
      >> husband is finished with his terminal degree.
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> I found what Tejinder mentioned regarding knowing someone in order to
      >> get a position is true in any industry. The academic world seems like
      >> a club similar to most professions where the politics is a factor.
      >> Dale also had a good comment regarding just having 'a warm body' to
      >> fill a position. In an area like Boston, there is a plethora of warm
      >> bodies out here right now and that is the problem. They are going to
      >> select those that fit 10 out of the 10 requirements, and not settle
      >> for those who have 9 out of the 10. I believe in areas such as Iowa,
      >> they are more grateful of the warm body to fill a position but not so
      >> much out here in the Northeast.
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> We are both open to opportunities around the country at this point but
      >> we have our sites set on the west Texas and New Mexico area right now.
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> Again, thank you for your information and valuable insight. It is
      >> much appreciated!
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> Melanie
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> /Melanie R. Salome/
      >>
      >> /mrsblue9@... <mailto:mrsblue9@...>/
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >
      >
    • earl@earlcapps.org
      Dale - good point. I did not pursue my MA with the intentions of teaching, knowing that I could hope for, at best, part-time adjunct. I did it for the
      Message 2 of 11 , Oct 12, 2009
        Dale - good point. I did not pursue my MA with the intentions of
        teaching, knowing that I could hope for, at best, part-time adjunct. I
        did it for the personal challenge, but certainly don't mind making a
        little spending money - or being able to cover my student loan payments
        without drawing off.

        My response was largely defending the status quo. I just was hoping for
        a little middle ground.

        But yep, there's plenty of miffdom to go around, no matter how you cut
        this cake.

        -------- Original Message --------
        Subject: Re: [americancomm] What Earl Capps said
        From: Dale Cyphert <Dale.Cyphert@...>
        Date: Mon, October 12, 2009 1:10 pm
        To: americancomm@yahoogroups.com

        Art,
        The thread has now split into two quite different issues.

        a) [Tom's point] is that the PhD ITSELF is an end unto its own,
        independent of the teaching responsibilities. Even now, in some of the
        highest ivory towers, the research and teaching functions are only
        tenuously related. The question at that point is actually whether a PhD
        holding researcher ought to be required to teach at all; many would
        argue that a full professor ought only mentor students in his or her own

        PhD program.

        b) [the original thread] is really about whether or not one can teach
        without a PhD. This is certainly possible in all sorts of institutions:
        community colleges, business organizations, and for-profit schools among

        them. Whether or not those are full-time jobs, well-paying jobs, or
        even pleasant jobs has everything to do with the "commoditization" of
        education, not the PhD degree.

        When an institution reserves its very few full-time, permanent,
        benefits-paying teaching slots for PhDs, those who might have formerly
        snagged such a job with a MA, MBA, or MFA are miffed.

        BUT, those who thought a PhD would get them a research gig and discover
        they can find only jobs where they must teach three or four courses a
        semester on top of maintaining that research productivity are equally
        miffed. (Or, they discover that in some fields, communication among
        them, PhD degrees are being granted at a rate that far exceeds the
        number of university openings. The opposite is going on in Finance and
        Accounting; if the degree is just a ticket to get a job, get a PhD in
        either of those fields!!)

        The reality is that the whole face of education is changing, and
        regardless of where you are on the academic food chain, there is miffdom

        to deal with.

        dale

        Dale Cyphert, Ph.D.
        Associate Professor
        Department of Management
        University of Northern Iowa
        1227 W.27th Street
        Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0125
        (319) 273-6150
        dale.cyphert@...

        Createcom Lynch wrote:
        >
        >
        > My concern with Thomas' statement, which I fully agree with, is that
        > doctorates are becoming required to teach! The two professions are
        > joined and teaching in and of itself is a profession, and a calling. How
        > does one enter full time community college or four year teaching schools
        > with the old and strict definition of what a doctorate is as these
        > schools increasingly use doctorate levels as other employers might high
        > school diplomas or BA's?
        >
        > Budget cuts, the transience of those seeking work, undercutting each
        > other on pay and increasing age, sex and other discrimination due to the
        > diversity of applications have turned the teaching college on its head.
        >
        > Accreditation races and competitiveness area also part of the cause.
        >
        > My personal Ax. I was teaching full time equivalent until cuts in
        > January 2008, designed simply to take people off the state retirement
        > and insurance rolls. Those cuts were cemented in 2009 with even deeper
        > budget cuts. Yet adjuncts move here from both coats and other countries
        > just to teach two sections at a community college.
        >
        > What future for those who wish to teach college full time? Particularly
        > older and "second profession" who did not do the academic traditional
        > route that the hooded universe seems to invoke.
        >
        >
        > -Art Lynch
        >
        >
        > On Oct 12, 2009, at 3:17 AM, Thomas Duncanson wrote:
        >
        >>
        >>
        >> I'm away for the semester, and just dipped into this discussion, by
        >> opening the amazing "Earl Capps" here in my local internet cafe.
        >>
        >> This time, Earl, I could hardly disagree more. The doctorate is not a
        >> game. It is deepening inquiry, and a commitment to a life time of
        >> deepening inquiry. Those books and journals on the book shelf are the
        >> advancement of human knowledge. Most of us who are tenured university
        >> faculty are open to consider all applicants for full and part-time
        >> positions, including second career seekers. However, the
        >> professoriate isn't so much a career as a life. It informs everything
        >> from the way you read your morning newspaper to your dreams when you
        >> sleep. It is one of the TRUE professions, wherein one is expected to
        >> operate with independent judgment and to endlessly initiate your own
        >> activities in teaching, research, and service. It is NOT an elaborate
        >> and expensive vehicle to deliver a fixed "curriculum." Almost none of
        >> us are paid what we are worth, and many of us are drastically
        >> underpaid. It isn't about what you need or what I need to have a
        >> certain style of life. And it isn't a venue for you as a bright
        >> person to be paid to have interesting and mostly pleasant interactions
        >> with promising young people. It isn't about you and me at all, in
        >> that sense. It is about our species knowing, representing, and as far
        >> as we are able mastering-- the universe. It is the "university," and
        >> the only institution in society that dares to carry this name.
        >>
        >> One can easily denigrate the hard work and constant interaction of
        >> university professors as "politics" or "networking" or "ass kissing"
        >> or whatever. It is easy to cite bad examples of failure and
        >> cynicism. But what happens when you have the audacity to look at the
        >> university and the feverish activity and endless ambition of its core
        >> members-- the faculty-- through the vantage of the actual long term
        >> ideals of the place?
        >>
        >> In a couple of weeks I am going to Bologna, and when I am there I am
        >> going to stop in and have a look around the University-- the first.
        >> When I read about the early years of the university, it always says
        >> that there were before "cathedral schools" in some locations, training
        >> priests, but that by the tenth century there was such excitement about
        >> what they were learning, what they were discovering, that the
        >> cathedral schools could not contain it. Could not contain it! And so
        >> they formed the first University at Bologna, and then at Paris, and so on.
        >>
        >> Do you have so much excitement about learning you would found the
        >> university if it did not already exist? Then you are the person I
        >> want to hire, and we'll sort out the degrees and so forth as it goes.
        >>
        >> MUCH of the activity of this list in recent years has concerned
        >> various short cuts to and around the university. But it is all
        >> predicated on this weird double think-- both great respect for,
        >> admiration of-- the university and jealousy of the privileges it
        >> maintains, and at the same time denigrating contempt for the
        >> instituion. The university is usually very clear about what it
        >> wants. It demands excellence in inquiry. If it didn't, would you
        >> still admire it? Try this thought experiment: a high school for
        >> somewhat older students with a really big football stadium? I'm not
        >> interested.
        >>
        >> Tom
        >>
        >> Tom Duncanson
        >> Millikin University
        >> tduncanson@... <mailto:tduncanson@...>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> >>> "Earl Capps" 10/11/09 12:06 PM >>>
        >>
        >>
        >> Networking and being known in the field is sometimes dismissed as
        >> ?politics?, but sometimes it?s essential. I?ve seen some live ones
        >> end up in teaching positions (fortunately, they usually didn?t last
        >> long). It?s really hard to tell who you?re dealing with unless you
        >> know them, or know someone who is familiar with them.
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> In a couple of cases, I?m surprised the institutions didn?t get hit by
        >> a lawsuit. Not that I thought they were responsible, but even if the
        >> lawsuit was thrown out, the cost of defending and the adverse
        >> publicity those individuals could have created if the right person had
        >> gone to the news media is something to think about.
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> In order to get my adjunct teaching slot, I had to really overkill. I
        >> was a very active student in my Master?s program with a lot of
        >> professional experience. I was the student who went to the
        >> conferences, took any chance to do guest lecturer stints, etc.
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> Is all that worth it for a career in teaching? Not with what you get
        >> paid if you have a Master?s and are teaching as an adjunct. Do I
        >> think a lot of it is necessary? I sure do. You can?t put someone in
        >> a position of trust and responsibility like that without knowing what
        >> they bring to the table.
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> People with Masters? degrees are, relative to the teaching needs of
        >> most colleges and universities, a dime a dozen. Is it fair that
        >> someone with an MA/MS and lots of career experience can?t get into a
        >> permanent position in academia? Not really. If my college offered me
        >> a chance to change careers and become some sort of ?senior
        >> instructor?, paid less than tenure-track professors, but enough to pay
        >> my bills, I might consider it.
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> Academia really handicaps itself by presuming that the only people
        >> worth keeping around are those who play ?the game? of having a
        >> doctorate and getting published. There are a lot of us who have
        >> plenty to offer who would love to spend our retirements on campus or
        >> make a second career of teaching, if we could get enough to pay our bills.
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> -earlcapps
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> *From:* americancomm@yahoogroups.com
        >> [mailto:americancomm@yahoogroups.com] *On Behalf Of *Melanie Salome
        >> *Sent:* Sunday, October 11, 2009 12:39 PM
        >> *To:* American Communication Association
        >> *Subject:* [americancomm] Obtaining a Teaching Position
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> Hi All,
        >>
        >> I want to thank you for your responses. They are both insightful and
        >> helpful.
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> We consider this time in our lives a great opportunity to actually
        >> pursue what we want to do. We were not happy in the financial
        >> services industry and this layoff was just another sign that we should
        >> be pursuing our dreams. We are in our mid 40's so it is a good time
        >> to consider a new career path and make positive changes.
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> If we move west, there is no risk of my husband not finishing his
        >> Doctorate because his program is primarily online at the University of
        >> Maryland. They have 3 residencies on campus throughout the year but
        >> the rest is online, so he will be finishing by the end of 2010. As
        >> for me, my search is for an adjunct position right now or perhaps in a
        >> community/junior college setting. My goal is to pursue my PhD once my
        >> husband is finished with his terminal degree.
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> I found what Tejinder mentioned regarding knowing someone in order to
        >> get a position is true in any industry. The academic world seems like
        >> a club similar to most professions where the politics is a factor.
        >> Dale also had a good comment regarding just having 'a warm body' to
        >> fill a position. In an area like Boston, there is a plethora of warm
        >> bodies out here right now and that is the problem. They are going to
        >> select those that fit 10 out of the 10 requirements, and not settle
        >> for those who have 9 out of the 10. I believe in areas such as Iowa,
        >> they are more grateful of the warm body to fill a position but not so
        >> much out here in the Northeast.
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> We are both open to opportunities around the country at this point but
        >> we have our sites set on the west Texas and New Mexico area right now.
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> Again, thank you for your information and valuable insight. It is
        >> much appreciated!
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> Melanie
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> /Melanie R. Salome/
        >>
        >> /mrsblue9@... <mailto:mrsblue9@...>/
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >
        >
      • Doug Picirillo
        I couldn t find miffdom in the dictionary but if our own Dr. Cyphert uses it then surely it must be a real word. I m pretty certain that the boundaries of
        Message 3 of 11 , Oct 12, 2009
          I couldn't find "miffdom" in the dictionary but if our own Dr. Cyphert uses it then surely it must be a "real" word. 
           
          I'm pretty certain that the boundaries of miffdom are not coterminous with those of academia.  It seems to me that the only ones in any walk of life who are rarely miffed are those who look backward with gratitude, forward with optimism and who successfully blend perseverance with adaptability.
           
           
          miffdom
          n.
           
          1. a domain, situation or environment abounding in things that miff
          2. a group of people who are easily or frequently miffed
           
           
           
          Doug Picirillo
           
           
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Monday, October 12, 2009 12:10 PM
          Subject: Re: [americancomm] What Earl Capps said

           

          Art,
          The thread has now split into two quite different issues.

          a) [Tom's point] is that the PhD ITSELF is an end unto its own,
          independent of the teaching responsibilities. Even now, in some of the
          highest ivory towers, the research and teaching functions are only
          tenuously related. The question at that point is actually whether a PhD
          holding researcher ought to be required to teach at all; many would
          argue that a full professor ought only mentor students in his or her own
          PhD program.

          b) [the original thread] is really about whether or not one can teach
          without a PhD. This is certainly possible in all sorts of institutions:
          community colleges, business organizations, and for-profit schools among
          them. Whether or not those are full-time jobs, well-paying jobs, or
          even pleasant jobs has everything to do with the "commoditization" of
          education, not the PhD degree.

          When an institution reserves its very few full-time, permanent,
          benefits-paying teaching slots for PhDs, those who might have formerly
          snagged such a job with a MA, MBA, or MFA are miffed.

          BUT, those who thought a PhD would get them a research gig and discover
          they can find only jobs where they must teach three or four courses a
          semester on top of maintaining that research productivity are equally
          miffed. (Or, they discover that in some fields, communication among
          them, PhD degrees are being granted at a rate that far exceeds the
          number of university openings. The opposite is going on in Finance and
          Accounting; if the degree is just a ticket to get a job, get a PhD in
          either of those fields!!)

          The reality is that the whole face of education is changing, and
          regardless of where you are on the academic food chain, there is miffdom
          to deal with.

          dale

          Dale Cyphert, Ph.D.
          Associate Professor
          Department of Management
          University of Northern Iowa
          1227 W.27th Street
          Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0125
          (319) 273-6150
          dale.cyphert@ uni.edu

          Createcom Lynch wrote:
          >
          >
          > My concern with Thomas' statement, which I fully agree with, is that
          > doctorates are becoming required to teach! The two professions are
          > joined and teaching in and of itself is a profession, and a calling. How
          > does one enter full time community college or four year teaching schools
          > with the old and strict definition of what a doctorate is as these
          > schools increasingly use doctorate levels as other employers might high
          > school diplomas or BA's?
          >
          > Budget cuts, the transience of those seeking work, undercutting each
          > other on pay and increasing age, sex and other discrimination due to the
          > diversity of applications have turned the teaching college on its head.
          >
          > Accreditation races and competitiveness area also part of the cause.
          >
          > My personal Ax. I was teaching full time equivalent until cuts in
          > January 2008, designed simply to take people off the state retirement
          > and insurance rolls. Those cuts were cemented in 2009 with even deeper
          > budget cuts. Yet adjuncts move here from both coats and other countries
          > just to teach two sections at a community college.
          >
          > What future for those who wish to teach college full time? Particularly
          > older and "second profession" who did not do the academic traditional
          > route that the hooded universe seems to invoke.
          >
          >
          > -Art Lynch
          >
          >
          > On Oct 12, 2009, at 3:17 AM, Thomas Duncanson wrote:
          >
          >>
          >>
          >> I'm away for the semester, and just dipped into this discussion, by
          >> opening the amazing "Earl Capps" here in my local internet cafe.
          >>
          >> This time, Earl, I could hardly disagree more. The doctorate is not a
          >> game. It is deepening inquiry, and a commitment to a life time of
          >> deepening inquiry. Those books and journals on the book shelf are the
          >> advancement of human knowledge. Most of us who are tenured university
          >> faculty are open to consider all applicants for full and part-time
          >> positions, including second career seekers. However, the
          >> professoriate isn't so much a career as a life. It informs everything
          >> from the way you read your morning newspaper to your dreams when you
          >> sleep. It is one of the TRUE professions, wherein one is expected to
          >> operate with independent judgment and to endlessly initiate your own
          >> activities in teaching, research, and service. It is NOT an elaborate
          >> and expensive vehicle to deliver a fixed "curriculum. " Almost none of
          >> us are paid what we are worth, and many of us are drastically
          >> underpaid. It isn't about what you need or what I need to have a
          >> certain style of life. And it isn't a venue for you as a bright
          >> person to be paid to have interesting and mostly pleasant interactions
          >> with promising young people. It isn't about you and me at all, in
          >> that sense. It is about our species knowing, representing, and as far
          >> as we are able mastering-- the universe. It is the "university, " and
          >> the only institution in society that dares to carry this name.
          >>
          >> One can easily denigrate the hard work and constant interaction of
          >> university professors as "politics" or "networking" or "ass kissing"
          >> or whatever. It is easy to cite bad examples of failure and
          >> cynicism. But what happens when you have the audacity to look at the
          >> university and the feverish activity and endless ambition of its core
          >> members-- the faculty-- through the vantage of the actual long term
          >> ideals of the place?
          >>
          >> In a couple of weeks I am going to Bologna, and when I am there I am
          >> going to stop in and have a look around the University-- the first.
          >> When I read about the early years of the university, it always says
          >> that there were before "cathedral schools" in some locations, training
          >> priests, but that by the tenth century there was such excitement about
          >> what they were learning, what they were discovering, that the
          >> cathedral schools could not contain it. Could not contain it! And so
          >> they formed the first University at Bologna, and then at Paris, and so on.
          >>
          >> Do you have so much excitement about learning you would found the
          >> university if it did not already exist? Then you are the person I
          >> want to hire, and we'll sort out the degrees and so forth as it goes.
          >>
          >> MUCH of the activity of this list in recent years has concerned
          >> various short cuts to and around the university. But it is all
          >> predicated on this weird double think-- both great respect for,
          >> admiration of-- the university and jealousy of the privileges it
          >> maintains, and at the same time denigrating contempt for the
          >> instituion. The university is usually very clear about what it
          >> wants. It demands excellence in inquiry. If it didn't, would you
          >> still admire it? Try this thought experiment: a high school for
          >> somewhat older students with a really big football stadium? I'm not
          >> interested.
          >>
          >> Tom
          >>
          >> Tom Duncanson
          >> Millikin University
          >> tduncanson@mail. millikin. edu <mailto:tduncanson@mail. millikin. edu>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> >>> "Earl Capps" 10/11/09 12:06 PM >>>
          >>
          >>
          >> Networking and being known in the field is sometimes dismissed as
          >> ?politics?, but sometimes it?s essential. I?ve seen some live ones
          >> end up in teaching positions (fortunately, they usually didn?t last
          >> long). It?s really hard to tell who you?re dealing with unless you
          >> know them, or know someone who is familiar with them.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> In a couple of cases, I?m surprised the institutions didn?t get hit by
          >> a lawsuit. Not that I thought they were responsible, but even if the
          >> lawsuit was thrown out, the cost of defending and the adverse
          >> publicity those individuals could have created if the right person had
          >> gone to the news media is something to think about.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> In order to get my adjunct teaching slot, I had to really overkill. I
          >> was a very active student in my Master?s program with a lot of
          >> professional experience. I was the student who went to the
          >> conferences, took any chance to do guest lecturer stints, etc.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> Is all that worth it for a career in teaching? Not with what you get
          >> paid if you have a Master?s and are teaching as an adjunct. Do I
          >> think a lot of it is necessary? I sure do. You can?t put someone in
          >> a position of trust and responsibility like that without knowing what
          >> they bring to the table.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> People with Masters? degrees are, relative to the teaching needs of
          >> most colleges and universities, a dime a dozen. Is it fair that
          >> someone with an MA/MS and lots of career experience can?t get into a
          >> permanent position in academia? Not really. If my college offered me
          >> a chance to change careers and become some sort of ?senior
          >> instructor?, paid less than tenure-track professors, but enough to pay
          >> my bills, I might consider it.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> Academia really handicaps itself by presuming that the only people
          >> worth keeping around are those who play ?the game? of having a
          >> doctorate and getting published. There are a lot of us who have
          >> plenty to offer who would love to spend our retirements on campus or
          >> make a second career of teaching, if we could get enough to pay our bills.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> -earlcapps
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> *From:* americancomm@ yahoogroups. com
          >> [mailto:americancomm@ yahoogroups. com] *On Behalf Of *Melanie Salome
          >> *Sent:* Sunday, October 11, 2009 12:39 PM
          >> *To:* American Communication Association
          >> *Subject:* [americancomm] Obtaining a Teaching Position
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> Hi All,
          >>
          >> I want to thank you for your responses. They are both insightful and
          >> helpful.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> We consider this time in our lives a great opportunity to actually
          >> pursue what we want to do. We were not happy in the financial
          >> services industry and this layoff was just another sign that we should
          >> be pursuing our dreams. We are in our mid 40's so it is a good time
          >> to consider a new career path and make positive changes.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> If we move west, there is no risk of my husband not finishing his
          >> Doctorate because his program is primarily online at the University of
          >> Maryland. They have 3 residencies on campus throughout the year but
          >> the rest is online, so he will be finishing by the end of 2010. As
          >> for me, my search is for an adjunct position right now or perhaps in a
          >> community/junior college setting. My goal is to pursue my PhD once my
          >> husband is finished with his terminal degree.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> I found what Tejinder mentioned regarding knowing someone in order to
          >> get a position is true in any industry. The academic world seems like
          >> a club similar to most professions where the politics is a factor.
          >> Dale also had a good comment regarding just having 'a warm body' to
          >> fill a position. In an area like Boston, there is a plethora of warm
          >> bodies out here right now and that is the problem. They are going to
          >> select those that fit 10 out of the 10 requirements, and not settle
          >> for those who have 9 out of the 10. I believe in areas such as Iowa,
          >> they are more grateful of the warm body to fill a position but not so
          >> much out here in the Northeast.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> We are both open to opportunities around the country at this point but
          >> we have our sites set on the west Texas and New Mexico area right now.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> Again, thank you for your information and valuable insight. It is
          >> much appreciated!
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> Melanie
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> /Melanie R. Salome/
          >>
          >> /mrsblue9@yahoo. com <mailto:mrsblue9@yahoo. com>/
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >
          >

        • Art Lynch
          The problem is your spending money is my income Sent from my iPhone
          Message 4 of 11 , Oct 12, 2009
            The problem is your spending money is my income 



            Sent from my iPhone

            On Oct 12, 2009, at 10:43 AM, earl@... wrote:

             

            Dale - good point. I did not pursue my MA with the intentions of
            teaching, knowing that I could hope for, at best, part-time adjunct. I
            did it for the personal challenge, but certainly don't mind making a
            little spending money - or being able to cover my student loan payments
            without drawing off.

            My response was largely defending the status quo. I just was hoping for
            a little middle ground.

            But yep, there's plenty of miffdom to go around, no matter how you cut
            this cake.

            -------- Original Message --------
            Subject: Re: [americancomm] What Earl Capps said
            From: Dale Cyphert <Dale.Cyphert@UNI.EDU>
            Date: Mon, October 12, 2009 1:10 pm
            To: americancomm@ yahoogroups. com

            Art,
            The thread has now split into two quite different issues.

            a) [Tom's point] is that the PhD ITSELF is an end unto its own,
            independent of the teaching responsibilities. Even now, in some of the
            highest ivory towers, the research and teaching functions are only
            tenuously related. The question at that point is actually whether a PhD
            holding researcher ought to be required to teach at all; many would
            argue that a full professor ought only mentor students in his or her own

            PhD program.

            b) [the original thread] is really about whether or not one can teach
            without a PhD. This is certainly possible in all sorts of institutions:
            community colleges, business organizations, and for-profit schools among

            them. Whether or not those are full-time jobs, well-paying jobs, or
            even pleasant jobs has everything to do with the "commoditization" of
            education, not the PhD degree.

            When an institution reserves its very few full-time, permanent,
            benefits-paying teaching slots for PhDs, those who might have formerly
            snagged such a job with a MA, MBA, or MFA are miffed.

            BUT, those who thought a PhD would get them a research gig and discover
            they can find only jobs where they must teach three or four courses a
            semester on top of maintaining that research productivity are equally
            miffed. (Or, they discover that in some fields, communication among
            them, PhD degrees are being granted at a rate that far exceeds the
            number of university openings. The opposite is going on in Finance and
            Accounting; if the degree is just a ticket to get a job, get a PhD in
            either of those fields!!)

            The reality is that the whole face of education is changing, and
            regardless of where you are on the academic food chain, there is miffdom

            to deal with.

            dale

            Dale Cyphert, Ph.D.
            Associate Professor
            Department of Management
            University of Northern Iowa
            1227 W.27th Street
            Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0125
            (319) 273-6150
            dale.cyphert@uni.edu

            Createcom Lynch wrote:
            >
            >
            > My concern with Thomas' statement, which I fully agree with, is that
            > doctorates are becoming required to teach! The two professions are
            > joined and teaching in and of itself is a profession, and a calling. How
            > does one enter full time community college or four year teaching schools
            > with the old and strict definition of what a doctorate is as these
            > schools increasingly use doctorate levels as other employers might high
            > school diplomas or BA's?
            >
            > Budget cuts, the transience of those seeking work, undercutting each
            > other on pay and increasing age, sex and other discrimination due to the
            > diversity of applications have turned the teaching college on its head.
            >
            > Accreditation races and competitiveness area also part of the cause.
            >
            > My personal Ax. I was teaching full time equivalent until cuts in
            > January 2008, designed simply to take people off the state retirement
            > and insurance rolls. Those cuts were cemented in 2009 with even deeper
            > budget cuts. Yet adjuncts move here from both coats and other countries
            > just to teach two sections at a community college.
            >
            > What future for those who wish to teach college full time? Particularly
            > older and "second profession" who did not do the academic traditional
            > route that the hooded universe seems to invoke.
            >
            >
            > -Art Lynch
            >
            >
            > On Oct 12, 2009, at 3:17 AM, Thomas Duncanson wrote:
            >
            >>
            >>
            >> I'm away for the semester, and just dipped into this discussion, by
            >> opening the amazing "Earl Capps" here in my local internet cafe.
            >>
            >> This time, Earl, I could hardly disagree more. The doctorate is not a
            >> game. It is deepening inquiry, and a commitment to a life time of
            >> deepening inquiry. Those books and journals on the book shelf are the
            >> advancement of human knowledge. Most of us who are tenured university
            >> faculty are open to consider all applicants for full and part-time
            >> positions, including second career seekers. However, the
            >> professoriate isn't so much a career as a life. It informs everything
            >> from the way you read your morning newspaper to your dreams when you
            >> sleep. It is one of the TRUE professions, wherein one is expected to
            >> operate with independent judgment and to endlessly initiate your own
            >> activities in teaching, research, and service. It is NOT an elaborate
            >> and expensive vehicle to deliver a fixed "curriculum. " Almost none of
            >> us are paid what we are worth, and many of us are drastically
            >> underpaid. It isn't about what you need or what I need to have a
            >> certain style of life. And it isn't a venue for you as a bright
            >> person to be paid to have interesting and mostly pleasant interactions
            >> with promising young people. It isn't about you and me at all, in
            >> that sense. It is about our species knowing, representing, and as far
            >> as we are able mastering-- the universe. It is the "university, " and
            >> the only institution in society that dares to carry this name.
            >>
            >> One can easily denigrate the hard work and constant interaction of
            >> university professors as "politics" or "networking" or "ass kissing"
            >> or whatever. It is easy to cite bad examples of failure and
            >> cynicism. But what happens when you have the audacity to look at the
            >> university and the feverish activity and endless ambition of its core
            >> members-- the faculty-- through the vantage of the actual long term
            >> ideals of the place?
            >>
            >> In a couple of weeks I am going to Bologna, and when I am there I am
            >> going to stop in and have a look around the University-- the first.
            >> When I read about the early years of the university, it always says
            >> that there were before "cathedral schools" in some locations, training
            >> priests, but that by the tenth century there was such excitement about
            >> what they were learning, what they were discovering, that the
            >> cathedral schools could not contain it. Could not contain it! And so
            >> they formed the first University at Bologna, and then at Paris, and so on.
            >>
            >> Do you have so much excitement about learning you would found the
            >> university if it did not already exist? Then you are the person I
            >> want to hire, and we'll sort out the degrees and so forth as it goes.
            >>
            >> MUCH of the activity of this list in recent years has concerned
            >> various short cuts to and around the university. But it is all
            >> predicated on this weird double think-- both great respect for,
            >> admiration of-- the university and jealousy of the privileges it
            >> maintains, and at the same time denigrating contempt for the
            >> instituion. The university is usually very clear about what it
            >> wants. It demands excellence in inquiry. If it didn't, would you
            >> still admire it? Try this thought experiment: a high school for
            >> somewhat older students with a really big football stadium? I'm not
            >> interested.
            >>
            >> Tom
            >>
            >> Tom Duncanson
            >> Millikin University
            >> tduncanson@mail. millikin. edu <mailto:tduncanson@mail. millikin. edu>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> >>> "Earl Capps" 10/11/09 12:06 PM >>>
            >>
            >>
            >> Networking and being known in the field is sometimes dismissed as
            >> ?politics?, but sometimes it?s essential. I?ve seen some live ones
            >> end up in teaching positions (fortunately, they usually didn?t last
            >> long). It?s really hard to tell who you?re dealing with unless you
            >> know them, or know someone who is familiar with them.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> In a couple of cases, I?m surprised the institutions didn?t get hit by
            >> a lawsuit. Not that I thought they were responsible, but even if the
            >> lawsuit was thrown out, the cost of defending and the adverse
            >> publicity those individuals could have created if the right person had
            >> gone to the news media is something to think about.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> In order to get my adjunct teaching slot, I had to really overkill. I
            >> was a very active student in my Master?s program with a lot of
            >> professional experience. I was the student who went to the
            >> conferences, took any chance to do guest lecturer stints, etc.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> Is all that worth it for a career in teaching? Not with what you get
            >> paid if you have a Master?s and are teaching as an adjunct. Do I
            >> think a lot of it is necessary? I sure do. You can?t put someone in
            >> a position of trust and responsibility like that without knowing what
            >> they bring to the table.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> People with Masters? degrees are, relative to the teaching needs of
            >> most colleges and universities, a dime a dozen. Is it fair that
            >> someone with an MA/MS and lots of career experience can?t get into a
            >> permanent position in academia? Not really. If my college offered me
            >> a chance to change careers and become some sort of ?senior
            >> instructor?, paid less than tenure-track professors, but enough to pay
            >> my bills, I might consider it.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> Academia really handicaps itself by presuming that the only people
            >> worth keeping around are those who play ?the game? of having a
            >> doctorate and getting published. There are a lot of us who have
            >> plenty to offer who would love to spend our retirements on campus or
            >> make a second career of teaching, if we could get enough to pay our bills.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> -earlcapps
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> *From:* americancomm@ yahoogroups. com
            >> [mailto:americancomm@ yahoogroups. com] *On Behalf Of *Melanie Salome
            >> *Sent:* Sunday, October 11, 2009 12:39 PM
            >> *To:* American Communication Association
            >> *Subject:* [americancomm] Obtaining a Teaching Position
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> Hi All,
            >>
            >> I want to thank you for your responses. They are both insightful and
            >> helpful.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> We consider this time in our lives a great opportunity to actually
            >> pursue what we want to do. We were not happy in the financial
            >> services industry and this layoff was just another sign that we should
            >> be pursuing our dreams. We are in our mid 40's so it is a good time
            >> to consider a new career path and make positive changes.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> If we move west, there is no risk of my husband not finishing his
            >> Doctorate because his program is primarily online at the University of
            >> Maryland. They have 3 residencies on campus throughout the year but
            >> the rest is online, so he will be finishing by the end of 2010. As
            >> for me, my search is for an adjunct position right now or perhaps in a
            >> community/junior college setting. My goal is to pursue my PhD once my
            >> husband is finished with his terminal degree.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> I found what Tejinder mentioned regarding knowing someone in order to
            >> get a position is true in any industry. The academic world seems like
            >> a club similar to most professions where the politics is a factor.
            >> Dale also had a good comment regarding just having 'a warm body' to
            >> fill a position. In an area like Boston, there is a plethora of warm
            >> bodies out here right now and that is the problem. They are going to
            >> select those that fit 10 out of the 10 requirements, and not settle
            >> for those who have 9 out of the 10. I believe in areas such as Iowa,
            >> they are more grateful of the warm body to fill a position but not so
            >> much out here in the Northeast.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> We are both open to opportunities around the country at this point but
            >> we have our sites set on the west Texas and New Mexico area right now.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> Again, thank you for your information and valuable insight. It is
            >> much appreciated!
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> Melanie
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> /Melanie R. Salome/
            >>
            >> /mrsblue9@yahoo. com <mailto:mrsblue9@yahoo. com>/
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >
            >

          • Earl Capps
            I can understand that, but if they hired me to teach, do you think that perhaps I might add value to the quality of education at my institution, and not
            Message 5 of 11 , Oct 12, 2009

              I can understand that, but if they hired me to teach, do you think that perhaps I might add value to the quality of education at my institution, and not because they’re cheapskates?

               

              In my professional career, I have performed HR functions in my work for the last 10 years, and communication functions for 20.  I don’t just teach several communication courses and go home.  I’m the Chair of my department’s alumni board, I apply my HR experience to help my students understand why communication skills are important, coach them for interviews, edit their resumes and provide a ton of advice that regular communication faculty

               

              I’m also very politically-connected in my home state.  This semester, my students have had the Speaker of the State House, two statewide elected officials, legislators, marketing people, and teachers come to talk to them about their careers.  Later this semester, I’ll have the Lt. Governor.

               

              Last semester, I used my connections to get two TV stations to agree to do a story exposing the local college slumlord when one of my students told me about leaking sewage and rats living in the walls of his home, and make darn sure City Hall condemned the property until repairs were made.

               

              My tenured and tenure-track friends, are great people but have spent their entire lives in academia, don’t have these connections and insights to add value to the classroom, as well as benefit the lives and future careers of my students.

               

              I’ve learned a lot from them and without a doubt, I owe them much for who I am today.  They took a 10th grade drop-out who came to college with a GED and some serious educational deficiencies and turned me into an honor graduate student and college professor.  My Chair, who gave me a chance, is no cheapskate, but rather someone who insists that every dollar his department spends generates value, and that everyone pull their weight, as he should.  Such people should form the nucleus of any faculty in any institution.

               

              What you call my “spending money”, isn’t anywhere near a livable wage, but you can bet I work for every penny.  You can demean us adjuncts if you’d like, or think you’re entitled to a job because you have a doctorate, but the reality is that those of us in the private sector have to work for our paycheck every day.  We don’t get tenure, summers off or paid sabbatical leave.

               

              Those who see a PhD as a meal ticket, and not what it was intended to be – a trust and honor – do a grave injustice to academia.  Maybe if you feel threatened, you should look at what you’ve done to justify your employment lately – like those in the private sector have to do every day – rather than blame it on us adjuncts who, instead of going home at night to rest and relax, take a big chunk of time out of our lives to share our experiences and our passions with students.

               

              -earlcapps

               

              From: americancomm@yahoogroups.com [mailto:americancomm@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Art Lynch
              Sent: Monday, October 12, 2009 4:07 PM
              To: americancomm@yahoogroups.com
              Cc: americancomm@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [americancomm] What Earl Capps said

               

               

              The problem is your spending money is my income 

               



              Sent from my iPhone


              On Oct 12, 2009, at 10:43 AM, earl@... wrote:

               

              Dale - good point. I did not pursue my MA with the intentions of
              teaching, knowing that I could hope for, at best, part-time adjunct. I
              did it for the personal challenge, but certainly don't mind making a
              little spending money - or being able to cover my student loan payments
              without drawing off.

              My response was largely defending the status quo. I just was hoping for
              a little middle ground.

              But yep, there's plenty of miffdom to go around, no matter how you cut
              this cake.

              -------- Original Message --------
              Subject: Re: [americancomm] What Earl Capps said
              From: Dale Cyphert <Dale.Cyphert@UNI.EDU>
              Date: Mon, October 12, 2009 1:10 pm
              To: americancomm@yahoogroups.com

              Art,
              The thread has now split into two quite different issues.

              a) [Tom's point] is that the PhD ITSELF is an end unto its own,
              independent of the teaching responsibilities. Even now, in some of the
              highest ivory towers, the research and teaching functions are only
              tenuously related. The question at that point is actually whether a PhD
              holding researcher ought to be required to teach at all; many would
              argue that a full professor ought only mentor students in his or her own

              PhD program.

              b) [the original thread] is really about whether or not one can teach
              without a PhD. This is certainly possible in all sorts of institutions:
              community colleges, business organizations, and for-profit schools among

              them. Whether or not those are full-time jobs, well-paying jobs, or
              even pleasant jobs has everything to do with the "commoditization" of
              education, not the PhD degree.

              When an institution reserves its very few full-time, permanent,
              benefits-paying teaching slots for PhDs, those who might have formerly
              snagged such a job with a MA, MBA, or MFA are miffed.

              BUT, those who thought a PhD would get them a research gig and discover
              they can find only jobs where they must teach three or four courses a
              semester on top of maintaining that research productivity are equally
              miffed. (Or, they discover that in some fields, communication among
              them, PhD degrees are being granted at a rate that far exceeds the
              number of university openings. The opposite is going on in Finance and
              Accounting; if the degree is just a ticket to get a job, get a PhD in
              either of those fields!!)

              The reality is that the whole face of education is changing, and
              regardless of where you are on the academic food chain, there is miffdom

              to deal with.

              dale

              Dale Cyphert, Ph.D.
              Associate Professor
              Department of Management
              University of Northern Iowa
              1227 W.27th Street
              Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0125
              (319) 273-6150
              dale.cyphert@uni.edu

              Createcom Lynch wrote:
              >
              >
              > My concern with Thomas' statement, which I fully agree with, is that
              > doctorates are becoming required to teach! The two professions are
              > joined and teaching in and of itself is a profession, and a calling. How
              > does one enter full time community college or four year teaching schools
              > with the old and strict definition of what a doctorate is as these
              > schools increasingly use doctorate levels as other employers might high
              > school diplomas or BA's?
              >
              > Budget cuts, the transience of those seeking work, undercutting each
              > other on pay and increasing age, sex and other discrimination due to the
              > diversity of applications have turned the teaching college on its head.
              >
              > Accreditation races and competitiveness area also part of the cause.
              >
              > My personal Ax. I was teaching full time equivalent until cuts in
              > January 2008, designed simply to take people off the state retirement
              > and insurance rolls. Those cuts were cemented in 2009 with even deeper
              > budget cuts. Yet adjuncts move here from both coats and other countries
              > just to teach two sections at a community college.
              >
              > What future for those who wish to teach college full time? Particularly
              > older and "second profession" who did not do the academic traditional
              > route that the hooded universe seems to invoke.
              >
              >
              > -Art Lynch
              >
              >
              > On Oct 12, 2009, at 3:17 AM, Thomas Duncanson wrote:
              >
              >>
              >>
              >> I'm away for the semester, and just dipped into this discussion, by
              >> opening the amazing "Earl Capps" here in my local internet cafe.
              >>
              >> This time, Earl, I could hardly disagree more. The doctorate is not a
              >> game. It is deepening inquiry, and a commitment to a life time of
              >> deepening inquiry. Those books and journals on the book shelf are the
              >> advancement of human knowledge. Most of us who are tenured university
              >> faculty are open to consider all applicants for full and part-time
              >> positions, including second career seekers. However, the
              >> professoriate isn't so much a career as a life. It informs everything
              >> from the way you read your morning newspaper to your dreams when you
              >> sleep. It is one of the TRUE professions, wherein one is expected to
              >> operate with independent judgment and to endlessly initiate your own
              >> activities in teaching, research, and service. It is NOT an elaborate
              >> and expensive vehicle to deliver a fixed "curriculum." Almost none of
              >> us are paid what we are worth, and many of us are drastically
              >> underpaid. It isn't about what you need or what I need to have a
              >> certain style of life. And it isn't a venue for you as a bright
              >> person to be paid to have interesting and mostly pleasant interactions
              >> with promising young people. It isn't about you and me at all, in
              >> that sense. It is about our species knowing, representing, and as far
              >> as we are able mastering-- the universe. It is the "university," and
              >> the only institution in society that dares to carry this name.
              >>
              >> One can easily denigrate the hard work and constant interaction of
              >> university professors as "politics" or "networking" or "ass kissing"
              >> or whatever. It is easy to cite bad examples of failure and
              >> cynicism. But what happens when you have the audacity to look at the
              >> university and the feverish activity and endless ambition of its core
              >> members-- the faculty-- through the vantage of the actual long term
              >> ideals of the place?
              >>
              >> In a couple of weeks I am going to Bologna, and when I am there I am
              >> going to stop in and have a look around the University-- the first.
              >> When I read about the early years of the university, it always says
              >> that there were before "cathedral schools" in some locations, training
              >> priests, but that by the tenth century there was such excitement about
              >> what they were learning, what they were discovering, that the
              >> cathedral schools could not contain it. Could not contain it! And so
              >> they formed the first University at Bologna, and then at Paris, and so on.
              >>
              >> Do you have so much excitement about learning you would found the
              >> university if it did not already exist? Then you are the person I
              >> want to hire, and we'll sort out the degrees and so forth as it goes.
              >>
              >> MUCH of the activity of this list in recent years has concerned
              >> various short cuts to and around the university. But it is all
              >> predicated on this weird double think-- both great respect for,
              >> admiration of-- the university and jealousy of the privileges it
              >> maintains, and at the same time denigrating contempt for the
              >> instituion. The university is usually very clear about what it
              >> wants. It demands excellence in inquiry. If it didn't, would you
              >> still admire it? Try this thought experiment: a high school for
              >> somewhat older students with a really big football stadium? I'm not
              >> interested.
              >>
              >> Tom
              >>
              >> Tom Duncanson
              >> Millikin University
              >> tduncanson@... <mailto:tduncanson@...>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> >>> "Earl Capps" 10/11/09 12:06 PM >>>
              >>
              >>
              >> Networking and being known in the field is sometimes dismissed as
              >> ?politics?, but sometimes it?s essential. I?ve seen some live ones
              >> end up in teaching positions (fortunately, they usually didn?t last
              >> long). It?s really hard to tell who you?re dealing with unless you
              >> know them, or know someone who is familiar with them.
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> In a couple of cases, I?m surprised the institutions didn?t get hit by
              >> a lawsuit. Not that I thought they were responsible, but even if the
              >> lawsuit was thrown out, the cost of defending and the adverse
              >> publicity those individuals could have created if the right person had
              >> gone to the news media is something to think about.
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> In order to get my adjunct teaching slot, I had to really overkill. I
              >> was a very active student in my Master?s program with a lot of
              >> professional experience. I was the student who went to the
              >> conferences, took any chance to do guest lecturer stints, etc.
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> Is all that worth it for a career in teaching? Not with what you get
              >> paid if you have a Master?s and are teaching as an adjunct. Do I
              >> think a lot of it is necessary? I sure do. You can?t put someone in
              >> a position of trust and responsibility like that without knowing what
              >> they bring to the table.
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> People with Masters? degrees are, relative to the teaching needs of
              >> most colleges and universities, a dime a dozen. Is it fair that
              >> someone with an MA/MS and lots of career experience can?t get into a
              >> permanent position in academia? Not really. If my college offered me
              >> a chance to change careers and become some sort of ?senior
              >> instructor?, paid less than tenure-track professors, but enough to pay
              >> my bills, I might consider it.
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> Academia really handicaps itself by presuming that the only people
              >> worth keeping around are those who play ?the game? of having a
              >> doctorate and getting published. There are a lot of us who have
              >> plenty to offer who would love to spend our retirements on campus or
              >> make a second career of teaching, if we could get enough to pay our bills.
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> -earlcapps
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> *From:* americancomm@yahoogroups.com
              >> [mailto:americancomm@yahoogroups.com] *On Behalf Of *Melanie Salome
              >> *Sent:* Sunday, October 11, 2009 12:39 PM
              >> *To:* American Communication Association
              >> *Subject:* [americancomm] Obtaining a Teaching Position
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> Hi All,
              >>
              >> I want to thank you for your responses. They are both insightful and
              >> helpful.
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> We consider this time in our lives a great opportunity to actually
              >> pursue what we want to do. We were not happy in the financial
              >> services industry and this layoff was just another sign that we should
              >> be pursuing our dreams. We are in our mid 40's so it is a good time
              >> to consider a new career path and make positive changes.
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> If we move west, there is no risk of my husband not finishing his
              >> Doctorate because his program is primarily online at the University of
              >> Maryland. They have 3 residencies on campus throughout the year but
              >> the rest is online, so he will be finishing by the end of 2010. As
              >> for me, my search is for an adjunct position right now or perhaps in a
              >> community/junior college setting. My goal is to pursue my PhD once my
              >> husband is finished with his terminal degree.
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> I found what Tejinder mentioned regarding knowing someone in order to
              >> get a position is true in any industry. The academic world seems like
              >> a club similar to most professions where the politics is a factor.
              >> Dale also had a good comment regarding just having 'a warm body' to
              >> fill a position. In an area like Boston, there is a plethora of warm
              >> bodies out here right now and that is the problem. They are going to
              >> select those that fit 10 out of the 10 requirements, and not settle
              >> for those who have 9 out of the 10. I believe in areas such as Iowa,
              >> they are more grateful of the warm body to fill a position but not so
              >> much out here in the Northeast.
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> We are both open to opportunities around the country at this point but
              >> we have our sites set on the west Texas and New Mexico area right now.
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> Again, thank you for your information and valuable insight. It is
              >> much appreciated!
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> Melanie
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> /Melanie R. Salome/
              >>
              >> /mrsblue9@... <mailto:mrsblue9@...>/
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >
              >

            • Createcom
              Sound like we have more in common than it may seem on the surface. Teaching is my profession. I would love to be able to do it full time again. And as for
              Message 6 of 11 , Oct 12, 2009

                Sound like we have more in common than it may seem on the surface. 

                 

                Teaching is my profession.

                 

                I would love to be able to do it full time again.

                 

                And as for ties, economics and integration keeps me here if possible. I am the voice of public radio on Sundays, a national board member of the Screen Actors Guild elected by Nevada, a former morning newscaster, active in theater and other areas of community. My wife loves her job as a Social Worker (MSW, LCSW) here. And money is now nonexistent to move.

                 

                But I would find a way if I could get hired. But adjuncts are cluttering the work force and turning all of us into "part time" "hobbyist" and the new cheep transient labor, in Nevada without benefits.

                 

                I have 35 years of communication experience, from journalist to advertising professional, actor to teacher. My MA was in 2000, but I have been teaching since 1997. 

                 

                This fall saw an influx of adjuncts, 36 new ones, most of them moving from elsewhere just to teach. A hiring freeze exist, but there were full timers added as emergency hires...bypassing those of us who had taught full time. It was primarily women and women "of color", with one gentleman hired due to his expertise (which is understandable).

                 

                We have little or no printing budget, only one administrative assistant for the second largest department at one of the largest community colleges in the country, 25 to 30 students in a class (up from 15) and turning students away. When I was full time equivalent (titled LOB here) I taught up to six sections of two courses plus helped the department in other areas (so, no we adjuncts do not  “just teach several sections and go home”” as you implied). I was close to a governor, two Lt. Governors, and have many political associates as well (although the cost of running for office has become a reason I am becoming disillusioned with any political connections anyone claims to have). My marketing firm elected a governor and a Lt. Governor.

                 

                Your rise from drop out is to be admired and applauded.

                 

                The person I responded to said they teach for “spending money”, because believe me I know that living on $1,700 a three credit course and being limited to teaching only two or three sections is the slum labor or academia, and that is my primary income source. I was referring to looking at it additional money while others, like myself, are kept by ready and willing adjuncts from earning a living in the field we have chosen and we love.

                 

                I earn my living with $13,500 total a year, including coaching actors, down from $67,000 in 2007. My wife’s income is keeping us afloat, but we are in bankruptcy. The ability to use adjuncts is how administration keeps us form earning a living teaching. And I am, out of their budget priorities, a fellow adjunct.

                 

                I am not blaming anything on you or anyone but management. I am saying that those who call it extra income, payback on loans or just doing it as a hobby are keeping those of us who have it as a profession from earning a living.

                 

                Read the Chronicle.

                 

                 

                 


                On Oct 12, 2009, at 1:27 PM, Earl Capps wrote:

                 

                I can understand that, but if they hired me to teach, do you think that perhaps I might add value to the quality of education at my institution, and not because they’re cheapskates?

                 

                In my professional career, I have performed HR functions in my work for the last 10 years, and communication functions for 20.  I don’t just teach several communication courses and go home.  I’m the Chair of my department’s alumni board, I apply my HR experience to help my students understand why communication skills are important, coach them for interviews, edit their resumes and provide a ton of advice that regular communication faculty

                 

                I’m also very politically- connected in my home state.  This semester, my students have had the Speaker of the State House, two statewide elected officials, legislators, marketing people, and teachers come to talk to them about their careers.  Later this semester, I’ll have the Lt. Governor.

                 

                Last semester, I used my connections to get two TV stations to agree to do a story exposing the local college slumlord when one of my students told me about leaking sewage and rats living in the walls of his home, and make darn sure City Hall condemned the property until repairs were made.

                 

                My tenured and tenure-track friends, are great people but have spent their entire lives in academia, don’t have these connections and insights to add value to the classroom, as well as benefit the lives and future careers of my students.

                 

                I’ve learned a lot from them and without a doubt, I owe them much for who I am today.  They took a 10th grade drop-out who came to college with a GED and some serious educational deficiencies and turned me into an honor graduate student and college professor.  My Chair, who gave me a chance, is no cheapskate, but rather someone who insists that every dollar his department spends generates value, and that everyone pull their weight, as he should.  Such people should form the nucleus of any faculty in any institution.

                 

                What you call my “spending money”, isn’t anywhere near a livable wage, but you can bet I work for every penny.  You can demean us adjuncts if you’d like, or think you’re entitled to a job because you have a doctorate, but the reality is that those of us in the private sector have to work for our paycheck every day.  We don’t get tenure, summers off or paid sabbatical leave.

                 

                Those who see a PhD as a meal ticket, and not what it was intended to be – a trust and honor – do a grave injustice to academia.  Maybe if you feel threatened, you should look at what you’ve done to justify your employment lately – like those in the private sector have to do every day – rather than blame it on us adjuncts who, instead of going home at night to rest and relax, take a big chunk of time out of our lives to share our experiences and our passions with students.

                 

                -earlcapps

                 

                From: americancomm@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:americancom m@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Art Lynch
                Sent: Monday, October 12, 2009 4:07 PM
                To: americancomm@ yahoogroups. com
                Cc: americancomm@ yahoogroups. com
                Subject: Re: [americancomm] What Earl Capps said

                 

                 

                The problem is your spending money is my income 

                 



                Sent from my iPhone


                On Oct 12, 2009, at 10:43 AM, earl@earlcapps. org wrote:

                 

                Dale - good point. I did not pursue my MA with the intentions of
                teaching, knowing that I could hope for, at best, part-time adjunct. I
                did it for the personal challenge, but certainly don't mind making a
                little spending money - or being able to cover my student loan payments
                without drawing off.

                My response was largely defending the status quo. I just was hoping for
                a little middle ground.

                But yep, there's plenty of miffdom to go around, no matter how you cut
                this cake.

                -------- Original Message --------
                Subject: Re: [americancomm] What Earl Capps said
                From: Dale Cyphert <Dale.Cyphert@UNI.EDU>
                Date: Mon, October 12, 2009 1:10 pm
                To: americancomm@ yahoogroups. com

                Art,
                The thread has now split into two quite different issues.

                a) [Tom's point] is that the PhD ITSELF is an end unto its own,
                independent of the teaching responsibilities. Even now, in some of the
                highest ivory towers, the research and teaching functions are only
                tenuously related. The question at that point is actually whether a PhD
                holding researcher ought to be required to teach at all; many would
                argue that a full professor ought only mentor students in his or her own

                PhD program.

                b) [the original thread] is really about whether or not one can teach
                without a PhD. This is certainly possible in all sorts of institutions:
                community colleges, business organizations, and for-profit schools among

                them. Whether or not those are full-time jobs, well-paying jobs, or
                even pleasant jobs has everything to do with the "commoditization" of
                education, not the PhD degree.

                When an institution reserves its very few full-time, permanent,
                benefits-paying teaching slots for PhDs, those who might have formerly
                snagged such a job with a MA, MBA, or MFA are miffed.

                BUT, those who thought a PhD would get them a research gig and discover
                they can find only jobs where they must teach three or four courses a
                semester on top of maintaining that research productivity are equally
                miffed. (Or, they discover that in some fields, communication among
                them, PhD degrees are being granted at a rate that far exceeds the
                number of university openings. The opposite is going on in Finance and
                Accounting; if the degree is just a ticket to get a job, get a PhD in
                either of those fields!!)

                The reality is that the whole face of education is changing, and
                regardless of where you are on the academic food chain, there is miffdom

                to deal with.

                dale

                Dale Cyphert, Ph.D.
                Associate Professor
                Department of Management
                University of Northern Iowa
                1227 W.27th Street
                Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0125
                (319) 273-6150
                dale.cyphert@uni.edu

                Createcom Lynch wrote:
                >
                >
                > My concern with Thomas' statement, which I fully agree with, is that
                > doctorates are becoming required to teach! The two professions are
                > joined and teaching in and of itself is a profession, and a calling. How
                > does one enter full time community college or four year teaching schools
                > with the old and strict definition of what a doctorate is as these
                > schools increasingly use doctorate levels as other employers might high
                > school diplomas or BA's?
                >
                > Budget cuts, the transience of those seeking work, undercutting each
                > other on pay and increasing age, sex and other discrimination due to the
                > diversity of applications have turned the teaching college on its head.
                >
                > Accreditation races and competitiveness area also part of the cause.
                >
                > My personal Ax. I was teaching full time equivalent until cuts in
                > January 2008, designed simply to take people off the state retirement
                > and insurance rolls. Those cuts were cemented in 2009 with even deeper
                > budget cuts. Yet adjuncts move here from both coats and other countries
                > just to teach two sections at a community college.
                >
                > What future for those who wish to teach college full time? Particularly
                > older and "second profession" who did not do the academic traditional
                > route that the hooded universe seems to invoke.
                >
                >
                > -Art Lynch
                >
                >
                > On Oct 12, 2009, at 3:17 AM, Thomas Duncanson wrote:
                >
                >>
                >>
                >> I'm away for the semester, and just dipped into this discussion, by
                >> opening the amazing "Earl Capps" here in my local internet cafe.
                >>
                >> This time, Earl, I could hardly disagree more. The doctorate is not a
                >> game. It is deepening inquiry, and a commitment to a life time of
                >> deepening inquiry. Those books and journals on the book shelf are the
                >> advancement of human knowledge. Most of us who are tenured university
                >> faculty are open to consider all applicants for full and part-time
                >> positions, including second career seekers. However, the
                >> professoriate isn't so much a career as a life. It informs everything
                >> from the way you read your morning newspaper to your dreams when you
                >> sleep. It is one of the TRUE professions, wherein one is expected to
                >> operate with independent judgment and to endlessly initiate your own
                >> activities in teaching, research, and service. It is NOT an elaborate
                >> and expensive vehicle to deliver a fixed "curriculum." Almost none of
                >> us are paid what we are worth, and many of us are drastically
                >> underpaid. It isn't about what you need or what I need to have a
                >> certain style of life. And it isn't a venue for you as a bright
                >> person to be paid to have interesting and mostly pleasant interactions
                >> with promising young people. It isn't about you and me at all, in
                >> that sense. It is about our species knowing, representing, and as far
                >> as we are able mastering-- the universe. It is the "university," and
                >> the only institution in society that dares to carry this name.
                >>
                >> One can easily denigrate the hard work and constant interaction of
                >> university professors as "politics" or "networking" or "ass kissing"
                >> or whatever. It is easy to cite bad examples of failure and
                >> cynicism. But what happens when you have the audacity to look at the
                >> university and the feverish activity and endless ambition of its core
                >> members-- the faculty-- through the vantage of the actual long term
                >> ideals of the place?
                >>
                >> In a couple of weeks I am going to Bologna, and when I am there I am
                >> going to stop in and have a look around the University-- the first.
                >> When I read about the early years of the university, it always says
                >> that there were before "cathedral schools" in some locations, training
                >> priests, but that by the tenth century there was such excitement about
                >> what they were learning, what they were discovering, that the
                >> cathedral schools could not contain it. Could not contain it! And so
                >> they formed the first University at Bologna, and then at Paris, and so on.
                >>
                >> Do you have so much excitement about learning you would found the
                >> university if it did not already exist? Then you are the person I
                >> want to hire, and we'll sort out the degrees and so forth as it goes.
                >>
                >> MUCH of the activity of this list in recent years has concerned
                >> various short cuts to and around the university. But it is all
                >> predicated on this weird double think-- both great respect for,
                >> admiration of-- the university and jealousy of the privileges it
                >> maintains, and at the same time denigrating contempt for the
                >> instituion. The university is usually very clear about what it
                >> wants. It demands excellence in inquiry. If it didn't, would you
                >> still admire it? Try this thought experiment: a high school for
                >> somewhat older students with a really big football stadium? I'm not
                >> interested.
                >>
                >> Tom
                >>
                >> Tom Duncanson
                >> Millikin University
                >> tduncanson@mail. millikin. edu <mailto:tduncanson@mail. millikin. edu>
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> >>> "Earl Capps" 10/11/09 12:06 PM >>>
                >>
                >>
                >> Networking and being known in the field is sometimes dismissed as
                >> ?politics?, but sometimes it?s essential. I?ve seen some live ones
                >> end up in teaching positions (fortunately, they usually didn?t last
                >> long). It?s really hard to tell who you?re dealing with unless you
                >> know them, or know someone who is familiar with them.
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> In a couple of cases, I?m surprised the institutions didn?t get hit by
                >> a lawsuit. Not that I thought they were responsible, but even if the
                >> lawsuit was thrown out, the cost of defending and the adverse
                >> publicity those individuals could have created if the right person had
                >> gone to the news media is something to think about.
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> In order to get my adjunct teaching slot, I had to really overkill. I
                >> was a very active student in my Master?s program with a lot of
                >> professional experience. I was the student who went to the
                >> conferences, took any chance to do guest lecturer stints, etc.
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> Is all that worth it for a career in teaching? Not with what you get
                >> paid if you have a Master?s and are teaching as an adjunct. Do I
                >> think a lot of it is necessary? I sure do. You can?t put someone in
                >> a position of trust and responsibility like that without knowing what
                >> they bring to the table.
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> People with Masters? degrees are, relative to the teaching needs of
                >> most colleges and universities, a dime a dozen. Is it fair that
                >> someone with an MA/MS and lots of career experience can?t get into a
                >> permanent position in academia? Not really. If my college offered me
                >> a chance to change careers and become some sort of ?senior
                >> instructor?, paid less than tenure-track professors, but enough to pay
                >> my bills, I might consider it.
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> Academia really handicaps itself by presuming that the only people
                >> worth keeping around are those who play ?the game? of having a
                >> doctorate and getting published. There are a lot of us who have
                >> plenty to offer who would love to spend our retirements on campus or
                >> make a second career of teaching, if we could get enough to pay our bills.
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> -earlcapps
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> *From:* americancomm@ yahoogroups. com
                >> [mailto:americancomm@ yahoogroups. com] *On Behalf Of *Melanie Salome
                >> *Sent:* Sunday, October 11, 2009 12:39 PM
                >> *To:* American Communication Association
                >> *Subject:* [americancomm] Obtaining a Teaching Position
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> Hi All,
                >>
                >> I want to thank you for your responses. They are both insightful and
                >> helpful.
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> We consider this time in our lives a great opportunity to actually
                >> pursue what we want to do. We were not happy in the financial
                >> services industry and this layoff was just another sign that we should
                >> be pursuing our dreams. We are in our mid 40's so it is a good time
                >> to consider a new career path and make positive changes.
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> If we move west, there is no risk of my husband not finishing his
                >> Doctorate because his program is primarily online at the University of
                >> Maryland. They have 3 residencies on campus throughout the year but
                >> the rest is online, so he will be finishing by the end of 2010. As
                >> for me, my search is for an adjunct position right now or perhaps in a
                >> community/junior college setting. My goal is to pursue my PhD once my
                >> husband is finished with his terminal degree.
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> I found what Tejinder mentioned regarding knowing someone in order to
                >> get a position is true in any industry. The academic world seems like
                >> a club similar to most professions where the politics is a factor.
                >> Dale also had a good comment regarding just having 'a warm body' to
                >> fill a position. In an area like Boston, there is a plethora of warm
                >> bodies out here right now and that is the problem. They are going to
                >> select those that fit 10 out of the 10 requirements, and not settle
                >> for those who have 9 out of the 10. I believe in areas such as Iowa,
                >> they are more grateful of the warm body to fill a position but not so
                >> much out here in the Northeast.
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> We are both open to opportunities around the country at this point but
                >> we have our sites set on the west Texas and New Mexico area right now.
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> Again, thank you for your information and valuable insight. It is
                >> much appreciated!
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> Melanie
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> /Melanie R. Salome/
                >>
                >> /mrsblue9@yahoo. com <mailto:mrsblue9@yahoo. com>/
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >
                >



              • Createcom
                PS: In deference to management. It is the recession and how those who have money think as they make decisions. Cut full timers and cut benefit to save money,
                Message 7 of 11 , Oct 12, 2009
                  PS: In deference to management.

                  It is the recession and how those who have money think as they make decisions. "Cut full timers and cut benefit to save money, there will be those who want to teach and would do it for free if they could...."

                  On Oct 12, 2009, at 2:17 PM, Createcom wrote:

                   

                  Sound like we have more in common than it may seem on the surface. 

                   

                  Teaching is my profession.

                   

                  I would love to be able to do it full time again.

                   

                  And as for ties, economics and integration keeps me here if possible. I am the voice of public radio on Sundays, a national board member of the Screen Actors Guild elected by Nevada, a former morning newscaster, active in theater and other areas of community. My wife loves her job as a Social Worker (MSW, LCSW) here. And money is now nonexistent to move.

                   

                  But I would find a way if I could get hired. But adjuncts are cluttering the work force and turning all of us into "part time" "hobbyist" and the new cheep transient labor, in Nevada without benefits.

                   

                  I have 35 years of communication experience, from journalist to advertising professional, actor to teacher. My MA was in 2000, but I have been teaching since 1997. 

                   

                  This fall saw an influx of adjuncts, 36 new ones, most of them moving from elsewhere just to teach. A hiring freeze exist, but there were full timers added as emergency hires...bypassing those of us who had taught full time. It was primarily women and women "of color", with one gentleman hired due to his expertise (which is understandable) .

                   

                  We have little or no printing budget, only one administrative assistant for the second largest department at one of the largest community colleges in the country, 25 to 30 students in a class (up from 15) and turning students away. When I was full time equivalent (titled LOB here) I taught up to six sections of two courses plus helped the department in other areas (so, no we adjuncts do not  “just teach several sections and go home”” as you implied). I was close to a governor, two Lt. Governors, and have many political associates as well (although the cost of running for office has become a reason I am becoming disillusioned with any political connections anyone claims to have). My marketing firm elected a governor and a Lt. Governor.

                   

                  Your rise from drop out is to be admired and applauded.

                   

                  The person I responded to said they teach for “spending money”, because believe me I know that living on $1,700 a three credit course and being limited to teaching only two or three sections is the slum labor or academia, and that is my primary income source. I was referring to looking at it additional money while others, like myself, are kept by ready and willing adjuncts from earning a living in the field we have chosen and we love.

                   

                  I earn my living with $13,500 total a year, including coaching actors, down from $67,000 in 2007. My wife’s income is keeping us afloat, but we are in bankruptcy. The ability to use adjuncts is how administration keeps us form earning a living teaching. And I am, out of their budget priorities, a fellow adjunct.

                   

                  I am not blaming anything on you or anyone but management. I am saying that those who call it extra income, payback on loans or just doing it as a hobby are keeping those of us who have it as a profession from earning a living.

                   

                  Read the Chronicle.

                   

                   

                   


                  On Oct 12, 2009, at 1:27 PM, Earl Capps wrote:

                   

                  I can understand that, but if they hired me to teach, do you think that perhaps I might add value to the quality of education at my institution, and not because they’re cheapskates?

                   

                  In my professional career, I have performed HR functions in my work for the last 10 years, and communication functions for 20.  I don’t just teach several communication courses and go home.  I’m the Chair of my department’s alumni board, I apply my HR experience to help my students understand why communication skills are important, coach them for interviews, edit their resumes and provide a ton of advice that regular communication faculty

                   

                  I’m also very politically- connected in my home state.  This semester, my students have had the Speaker of the State House, two statewide elected officials, legislators, marketing people, and teachers come to talk to them about their careers.  Later this semester, I’ll have the Lt. Governor.

                   

                  Last semester, I used my connections to get two TV stations to agree to do a story exposing the local college slumlord when one of my students told me about leaking sewage and rats living in the walls of his home, and make darn sure City Hall condemned the property until repairs were made.

                   

                  My tenured and tenure-track friends, are great people but have spent their entire lives in academia, don’t have these connections and insights to add value to the classroom, as well as benefit the lives and future careers of my students.

                   

                  I’ve learned a lot from them and without a doubt, I owe them much for who I am today.  They took a 10th grade drop-out who came to college with a GED and some serious educational deficiencies and turned me into an honor graduate student and college professor.  My Chair, who gave me a chance, is no cheapskate, but rather someone who insists that every dollar his department spends generates value, and that everyone pull their weight, as he should.  Such people should form the nucleus of any faculty in any institution.

                   

                  What you call my “spending money”, isn’t anywhere near a livable wage, but you can bet I work for every penny.  You can demean us adjuncts if you’d like, or think you’re entitled to a job because you have a doctorate, but the reality is that those of us in the private sector have to work for our paycheck every day.  We don’t get tenure, summers off or paid sabbatical leave.

                   

                  Those who see a PhD as a meal ticket, and not what it was intended to be – a trust and honor – do a grave injustice to academia.  Maybe if you feel threatened, you should look at what you’ve done to justify your employment lately – like those in the private sector have to do every day – rather than blame it on us adjuncts who, instead of going home at night to rest and relax, take a big chunk of time out of our lives to share our experiences and our passions with students.

                   

                  -earlcapps

                   

                  From: americancomm@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:americancom m@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Art Lynch
                  Sent: Monday, October 12, 2009 4:07 PM
                  To: americancomm@ yahoogroups. com
                  Cc: americancomm@ yahoogroups. com
                  Subject: Re: [americancomm] What Earl Capps said

                   

                   

                  The problem is your spending money is my income 

                   



                  Sent from my iPhone


                  On Oct 12, 2009, at 10:43 AM, earl@earlcapps. org wrote:

                   

                  Dale - good point. I did not pursue my MA with the intentions of
                  teaching, knowing that I could hope for, at best, part-time adjunct. I
                  did it for the personal challenge, but certainly don't mind making a
                  little spending money - or being able to cover my student loan payments
                  without drawing off.

                  My response was largely defending the status quo. I just was hoping for
                  a little middle ground.

                  But yep, there's plenty of miffdom to go around, no matter how you cut
                  this cake.

                  -------- Original Message --------
                  Subject: Re: [americancomm] What Earl Capps said
                  From: Dale Cyphert <Dale.Cyphert@UNI.EDU>
                  Date: Mon, October 12, 2009 1:10 pm
                  To: americancomm@ yahoogroups. com

                  Art,
                  The thread has now split into two quite different issues.

                  a) [Tom's point] is that the PhD ITSELF is an end unto its own,
                  independent of the teaching responsibilities. Even now, in some of the
                  highest ivory towers, the research and teaching functions are only
                  tenuously related. The question at that point is actually whether a PhD
                  holding researcher ought to be required to teach at all; many would
                  argue that a full professor ought only mentor students in his or her own

                  PhD program.

                  b) [the original thread] is really about whether or not one can teach
                  without a PhD. This is certainly possible in all sorts of institutions:
                  community colleges, business organizations, and for-profit schools among

                  them. Whether or not those are full-time jobs, well-paying jobs, or
                  even pleasant jobs has everything to do with the "commoditization" of
                  education, not the PhD degree.

                  When an institution reserves its very few full-time, permanent,
                  benefits-paying teaching slots for PhDs, those who might have formerly
                  snagged such a job with a MA, MBA, or MFA are miffed.

                  BUT, those who thought a PhD would get them a research gig and discover
                  they can find only jobs where they must teach three or four courses a
                  semester on top of maintaining that research productivity are equally
                  miffed. (Or, they discover that in some fields, communication among
                  them, PhD degrees are being granted at a rate that far exceeds the
                  number of university openings. The opposite is going on in Finance and
                  Accounting; if the degree is just a ticket to get a job, get a PhD in
                  either of those fields!!)

                  The reality is that the whole face of education is changing, and
                  regardless of where you are on the academic food chain, there is miffdom

                  to deal with.

                  dale

                  Dale Cyphert, Ph.D.
                  Associate Professor
                  Department of Management
                  University of Northern Iowa
                  1227 W.27th Street
                  Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0125
                  (319) 273-6150
                  dale.cyphert@uni.edu

                  Createcom Lynch wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > My concern with Thomas' statement, which I fully agree with, is that
                  > doctorates are becoming required to teach! The two professions are
                  > joined and teaching in and of itself is a profession, and a calling. How
                  > does one enter full time community college or four year teaching schools
                  > with the old and strict definition of what a doctorate is as these
                  > schools increasingly use doctorate levels as other employers might high
                  > school diplomas or BA's?
                  >
                  > Budget cuts, the transience of those seeking work, undercutting each
                  > other on pay and increasing age, sex and other discrimination due to the
                  > diversity of applications have turned the teaching college on its head.
                  >
                  > Accreditation races and competitiveness area also part of the cause.
                  >
                  > My personal Ax. I was teaching full time equivalent until cuts in
                  > January 2008, designed simply to take people off the state retirement
                  > and insurance rolls. Those cuts were cemented in 2009 with even deeper
                  > budget cuts. Yet adjuncts move here from both coats and other countries
                  > just to teach two sections at a community college.
                  >
                  > What future for those who wish to teach college full time? Particularly
                  > older and "second profession" who did not do the academic traditional
                  > route that the hooded universe seems to invoke.
                  >
                  >
                  > -Art Lynch
                  >
                  >
                  > On Oct 12, 2009, at 3:17 AM, Thomas Duncanson wrote:
                  >
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> I'm away for the semester, and just dipped into this discussion, by
                  >> opening the amazing "Earl Capps" here in my local internet cafe.
                  >>
                  >> This time, Earl, I could hardly disagree more. The doctorate is not a
                  >> game. It is deepening inquiry, and a commitment to a life time of
                  >> deepening inquiry. Those books and journals on the book shelf are the
                  >> advancement of human knowledge. Most of us who are tenured university
                  >> faculty are open to consider all applicants for full and part-time
                  >> positions, including second career seekers. However, the
                  >> professoriate isn't so much a career as a life. It informs everything
                  >> from the way you read your morning newspaper to your dreams when you
                  >> sleep. It is one of the TRUE professions, wherein one is expected to
                  >> operate with independent judgment and to endlessly initiate your own
                  >> activities in teaching, research, and service. It is NOT an elaborate
                  >> and expensive vehicle to deliver a fixed "curriculum. " Almost none of
                  >> us are paid what we are worth, and many of us are drastically
                  >> underpaid. It isn't about what you need or what I need to have a
                  >> certain style of life. And it isn't a venue for you as a bright
                  >> person to be paid to have interesting and mostly pleasant interactions
                  >> with promising young people. It isn't about you and me at all, in
                  >> that sense. It is about our species knowing, representing, and as far
                  >> as we are able mastering-- the universe. It is the "university, " and
                  >> the only institution in society that dares to carry this name.
                  >>
                  >> One can easily denigrate the hard work and constant interaction of
                  >> university professors as "politics" or "networking" or "ass kissing"
                  >> or whatever. It is easy to cite bad examples of failure and
                  >> cynicism. But what happens when you have the audacity to look at the
                  >> university and the feverish activity and endless ambition of its core
                  >> members-- the faculty-- through the vantage of the actual long term
                  >> ideals of the place?
                  >>
                  >> In a couple of weeks I am going to Bologna, and when I am there I am
                  >> going to stop in and have a look around the University-- the first.
                  >> When I read about the early years of the university, it always says
                  >> that there were before "cathedral schools" in some locations, training
                  >> priests, but that by the tenth century there was such excitement about
                  >> what they were learning, what they were discovering, that the
                  >> cathedral schools could not contain it. Could not contain it! And so
                  >> they formed the first University at Bologna, and then at Paris, and so on.
                  >>
                  >> Do you have so much excitement about learning you would found the
                  >> university if it did not already exist? Then you are the person I
                  >> want to hire, and we'll sort out the degrees and so forth as it goes.
                  >>
                  >> MUCH of the activity of this list in recent years has concerned
                  >> various short cuts to and around the university. But it is all
                  >> predicated on this weird double think-- both great respect for,
                  >> admiration of-- the university and jealousy of the privileges it
                  >> maintains, and at the same time denigrating contempt for the
                  >> instituion. The university is usually very clear about what it
                  >> wants. It demands excellence in inquiry. If it didn't, would you
                  >> still admire it? Try this thought experiment: a high school for
                  >> somewhat older students with a really big football stadium? I'm not
                  >> interested.
                  >>
                  >> Tom
                  >>
                  >> Tom Duncanson
                  >> Millikin University
                  >> tduncanson@mail. millikin. edu <mailto:tduncanson@mail. millikin. edu>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> >>> "Earl Capps" 10/11/09 12:06 PM >>>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> Networking and being known in the field is sometimes dismissed as
                  >> ?politics?, but sometimes it?s essential. I?ve seen some live ones
                  >> end up in teaching positions (fortunately, they usually didn?t last
                  >> long). It?s really hard to tell who you?re dealing with unless you
                  >> know them, or know someone who is familiar with them.
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> In a couple of cases, I?m surprised the institutions didn?t get hit by
                  >> a lawsuit. Not that I thought they were responsible, but even if the
                  >> lawsuit was thrown out, the cost of defending and the adverse
                  >> publicity those individuals could have created if the right person had
                  >> gone to the news media is something to think about.
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> In order to get my adjunct teaching slot, I had to really overkill. I
                  >> was a very active student in my Master?s program with a lot of
                  >> professional experience. I was the student who went to the
                  >> conferences, took any chance to do guest lecturer stints, etc.
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> Is all that worth it for a career in teaching? Not with what you get
                  >> paid if you have a Master?s and are teaching as an adjunct. Do I
                  >> think a lot of it is necessary? I sure do. You can?t put someone in
                  >> a position of trust and responsibility like that without knowing what
                  >> they bring to the table.
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> People with Masters? degrees are, relative to the teaching needs of
                  >> most colleges and universities, a dime a dozen. Is it fair that
                  >> someone with an MA/MS and lots of career experience can?t get into a
                  >> permanent position in academia? Not really. If my college offered me
                  >> a chance to change careers and become some sort of ?senior
                  >> instructor?, paid less than tenure-track professors, but enough to pay
                  >> my bills, I might consider it.
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> Academia really handicaps itself by presuming that the only people
                  >> worth keeping around are those who play ?the game? of having a
                  >> doctorate and getting published. There are a lot of us who have
                  >> plenty to offer who would love to spend our retirements on campus or
                  >> make a second career of teaching, if we could get enough to pay our bills.
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> -earlcapps
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> *From:* americancomm@ yahoogroups. com
                  >> [mailto:americancomm@ yahoogroups. com] *On Behalf Of *Melanie Salome
                  >> *Sent:* Sunday, October 11, 2009 12:39 PM
                  >> *To:* American Communication Association
                  >> *Subject:* [americancomm] Obtaining a Teaching Position
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> Hi All,
                  >>
                  >> I want to thank you for your responses. They are both insightful and
                  >> helpful.
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> We consider this time in our lives a great opportunity to actually
                  >> pursue what we want to do. We were not happy in the financial
                  >> services industry and this layoff was just another sign that we should
                  >> be pursuing our dreams. We are in our mid 40's so it is a good time
                  >> to consider a new career path and make positive changes.
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> If we move west, there is no risk of my husband not finishing his
                  >> Doctorate because his program is primarily online at the University of
                  >> Maryland. They have 3 residencies on campus throughout the year but
                  >> the rest is online, so he will be finishing by the end of 2010. As
                  >> for me, my search is for an adjunct position right now or perhaps in a
                  >> community/junior college setting. My goal is to pursue my PhD once my
                  >> husband is finished with his terminal degree.
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> I found what Tejinder mentioned regarding knowing someone in order to
                  >> get a position is true in any industry. The academic world seems like
                  >> a club similar to most professions where the politics is a factor.
                  >> Dale also had a good comment regarding just having 'a warm body' to
                  >> fill a position. In an area like Boston, there is a plethora of warm
                  >> bodies out here right now and that is the problem. They are going to
                  >> select those that fit 10 out of the 10 requirements, and not settle
                  >> for those who have 9 out of the 10. I believe in areas such as Iowa,
                  >> they are more grateful of the warm body to fill a position but not so
                  >> much out here in the Northeast.
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> We are both open to opportunities around the country at this point but
                  >> we have our sites set on the west Texas and New Mexico area right now.
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> Again, thank you for your information and valuable insight. It is
                  >> much appreciated!
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> Melanie
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> /Melanie R. Salome/
                  >>
                  >> /mrsblue9@yahoo. com <mailto:mrsblue9@yahoo. com>/
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >
                  >





                • Lori V. Roe
                  By the way, I need adjuncts for the spring semester. Anyone live in Northern Indiana? Lori Lori Roe Assistant Professor of Communication Ivy Tech Community
                  Message 8 of 11 , Oct 12, 2009

                    By the way, I need adjuncts for the spring semester. Anyone live in Northern Indiana?

                     

                    Lori

                     

                    Lori Roe

                    Assistant Professor of Communication

                    Ivy Tech Community College

                    2521 Industrial Parkway

                    Elkhart, IN  46516

                    574-293-4657 ext. 4210

                    SQ: Ideation – Communication – Strategic – Relator - Learner

                     

                    From: americancomm@yahoogroups.com [mailto:americancomm@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Earl Capps
                    Sent: Monday, October 12, 2009 4:28 PM
                    To: americancomm@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: RE: [americancomm] What Earl Capps said

                     

                     

                    I can understand that, but if they hired me to teach, do you think that perhaps I might add value to the quality of education at my institution, and not because they’re cheapskates?

                     

                    In my professional career, I have performed HR functions in my work for the last 10 years, and communication functions for 20.  I don’t just teach several communication courses and go home.  I’m the Chair of my department’s alumni board, I apply my HR experience to help my students understand why communication skills are important, coach them for interviews, edit their resumes and provide a ton of advice that regular communication faculty

                     

                    I’m also very politically-connected in my home state.  This semester, my students have had the Speaker of the State House, two statewide elected officials, legislators, marketing people, and teachers come to talk to them about their careers.  Later this semester, I’ll have the Lt. Governor.

                     

                    Last semester, I used my connections to get two TV stations to agree to do a story exposing the local college slumlord when one of my students told me about leaking sewage and rats living in the walls of his home, and make darn sure City Hall condemned the property until repairs were made.

                     

                    My tenured and tenure-track friends, are great people but have spent their entire lives in academia, don’t have these connections and insights to add value to the classroom, as well as benefit the lives and future careers of my students.

                     

                    I’ve learned a lot from them and without a doubt, I owe them much for who I am today.  They took a 10th grade drop-out who came to college with a GED and some serious educational deficiencies and turned me into an honor graduate student and college professor.  My Chair, who gave me a chance, is no cheapskate, but rather someone who insists that every dollar his department spends generates value, and that everyone pull their weight, as he should.  Such people should form the nucleus of any faculty in any institution.

                     

                    What you call my “spending money”, isn’t anywhere near a livable wage, but you can bet I work for every penny.  You can demean us adjuncts if you’d like, or think you’re entitled to a job because you have a doctorate, but the reality is that those of us in the private sector have to work for our paycheck every day.  We don’t get tenure, summers off or paid sabbatical leave.

                     

                    Those who see a PhD as a meal ticket, and not what it was intended to be – a trust and honor – do a grave injustice to academia.  Maybe if you feel threatened, you should look at what you’ve done to justify your employment lately – like those in the private sector have to do every day – rather than blame it on us adjuncts who, instead of going home at night to rest and relax, take a big chunk of time out of our lives to share our experiences and our passions with students.

                     

                    -earlcapps

                     

                    From: americancomm@yahoogroups.com [mailto:americancomm@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Art Lynch
                    Sent: Monday, October 12, 2009 4:07 PM
                    To: americancomm@yahoogroups.com
                    Cc: americancomm@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [americancomm] What Earl Capps said

                     

                     

                    The problem is your spending money is my income 

                     



                    Sent from my iPhone


                    On Oct 12, 2009, at 10:43 AM, earl@... wrote:

                     

                    Dale - good point. I did not pursue my MA with the intentions of
                    teaching, knowing that I could hope for, at best, part-time adjunct. I
                    did it for the personal challenge, but certainly don't mind making a
                    little spending money - or being able to cover my student loan payments
                    without drawing off.

                    My response was largely defending the status quo. I just was hoping for
                    a little middle ground.

                    But yep, there's plenty of miffdom to go around, no matter how you cut
                    this cake.

                    -------- Original Message --------
                    Subject: Re: [americancomm] What Earl Capps said
                    From: Dale Cyphert <Dale.Cyphert@UNI.EDU>
                    Date: Mon, October 12, 2009 1:10 pm
                    To: americancomm@yahoogroups.com

                    Art,
                    The thread has now split into two quite different issues.

                    a) [Tom's point] is that the PhD ITSELF is an end unto its own,
                    independent of the teaching responsibilities. Even now, in some of the
                    highest ivory towers, the research and teaching functions are only
                    tenuously related. The question at that point is actually whether a PhD
                    holding researcher ought to be required to teach at all; many would
                    argue that a full professor ought only mentor students in his or her own

                    PhD program.

                    b) [the original thread] is really about whether or not one can teach
                    without a PhD. This is certainly possible in all sorts of institutions:
                    community colleges, business organizations, and for-profit schools among

                    them. Whether or not those are full-time jobs, well-paying jobs, or
                    even pleasant jobs has everything to do with the "commoditization" of
                    education, not the PhD degree.

                    When an institution reserves its very few full-time, permanent,
                    benefits-paying teaching slots for PhDs, those who might have formerly
                    snagged such a job with a MA, MBA, or MFA are miffed.

                    BUT, those who thought a PhD would get them a research gig and discover
                    they can find only jobs where they must teach three or four courses a
                    semester on top of maintaining that research productivity are equally
                    miffed. (Or, they discover that in some fields, communication among
                    them, PhD degrees are being granted at a rate that far exceeds the
                    number of university openings. The opposite is going on in Finance and
                    Accounting; if the degree is just a ticket to get a job, get a PhD in
                    either of those fields!!)

                    The reality is that the whole face of education is changing, and
                    regardless of where you are on the academic food chain, there is miffdom

                    to deal with.

                    dale

                    Dale Cyphert, Ph.D.
                    Associate Professor
                    Department of Management
                    University of Northern Iowa
                    1227 W.27th Street
                    Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0125
                    (319) 273-6150
                    dale.cyphert@uni.edu

                    Createcom Lynch wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > My concern with Thomas' statement, which I fully agree with, is that
                    > doctorates are becoming required to teach! The two professions are
                    > joined and teaching in and of itself is a profession, and a calling. How
                    > does one enter full time community college or four year teaching schools
                    > with the old and strict definition of what a doctorate is as these
                    > schools increasingly use doctorate levels as other employers might high
                    > school diplomas or BA's?
                    >
                    > Budget cuts, the transience of those seeking work, undercutting each
                    > other on pay and increasing age, sex and other discrimination due to the
                    > diversity of applications have turned the teaching college on its head.
                    >
                    > Accreditation races and competitiveness area also part of the cause.
                    >
                    > My personal Ax. I was teaching full time equivalent until cuts in
                    > January 2008, designed simply to take people off the state retirement
                    > and insurance rolls. Those cuts were cemented in 2009 with even deeper
                    > budget cuts. Yet adjuncts move here from both coats and other countries
                    > just to teach two sections at a community college.
                    >
                    > What future for those who wish to teach college full time? Particularly
                    > older and "second profession" who did not do the academic traditional
                    > route that the hooded universe seems to invoke.
                    >
                    >
                    > -Art Lynch
                    >
                    >
                    > On Oct 12, 2009, at 3:17 AM, Thomas Duncanson wrote:
                    >
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> I'm away for the semester, and just dipped into this discussion, by
                    >> opening the amazing "Earl Capps" here in my local internet cafe.
                    >>
                    >> This time, Earl, I could hardly disagree more. The doctorate is not a
                    >> game. It is deepening inquiry, and a commitment to a life time of
                    >> deepening inquiry. Those books and journals on the book shelf are the
                    >> advancement of human knowledge. Most of us who are tenured university
                    >> faculty are open to consider all applicants for full and part-time
                    >> positions, including second career seekers. However, the
                    >> professoriate isn't so much a career as a life. It informs everything
                    >> from the way you read your morning newspaper to your dreams when you
                    >> sleep. It is one of the TRUE professions, wherein one is expected to
                    >> operate with independent judgment and to endlessly initiate your own
                    >> activities in teaching, research, and service. It is NOT an elaborate
                    >> and expensive vehicle to deliver a fixed "curriculum." Almost none of
                    >> us are paid what we are worth, and many of us are drastically
                    >> underpaid. It isn't about what you need or what I need to have a
                    >> certain style of life. And it isn't a venue for you as a bright
                    >> person to be paid to have interesting and mostly pleasant interactions
                    >> with promising young people. It isn't about you and me at all, in
                    >> that sense. It is about our species knowing, representing, and as far
                    >> as we are able mastering-- the universe. It is the "university," and
                    >> the only institution in society that dares to carry this name.
                    >>
                    >> One can easily denigrate the hard work and constant interaction of
                    >> university professors as "politics" or "networking" or "ass kissing"
                    >> or whatever. It is easy to cite bad examples of failure and
                    >> cynicism. But what happens when you have the audacity to look at the
                    >> university and the feverish activity and endless ambition of its core
                    >> members-- the faculty-- through the vantage of the actual long term
                    >> ideals of the place?
                    >>
                    >> In a couple of weeks I am going to Bologna, and when I am there I am
                    >> going to stop in and have a look around the University-- the first.
                    >> When I read about the early years of the university, it always says
                    >> that there were before "cathedral schools" in some locations, training
                    >> priests, but that by the tenth century there was such excitement about
                    >> what they were learning, what they were discovering, that the
                    >> cathedral schools could not contain it. Could not contain it! And so
                    >> they formed the first University at Bologna, and then at Paris, and so on.
                    >>
                    >> Do you have so much excitement about learning you would found the
                    >> university if it did not already exist? Then you are the person I
                    >> want to hire, and we'll sort out the degrees and so forth as it goes.
                    >>
                    >> MUCH of the activity of this list in recent years has concerned
                    >> various short cuts to and around the university. But it is all
                    >> predicated on this weird double think-- both great respect for,
                    >> admiration of-- the university and jealousy of the privileges it
                    >> maintains, and at the same time denigrating contempt for the
                    >> instituion. The university is usually very clear about what it
                    >> wants. It demands excellence in inquiry. If it didn't, would you
                    >> still admire it? Try this thought experiment: a high school for
                    >> somewhat older students with a really big football stadium? I'm not
                    >> interested.
                    >>
                    >> Tom
                    >>
                    >> Tom Duncanson
                    >> Millikin University
                    >> tduncanson@... <mailto:tduncanson@...>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> >>> "Earl Capps" 10/11/09 12:06 PM >>>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> Networking and being known in the field is sometimes dismissed as
                    >> ?politics?, but sometimes it?s essential. I?ve seen some live ones
                    >> end up in teaching positions (fortunately, they usually didn?t last
                    >> long). It?s really hard to tell who you?re dealing with unless you
                    >> know them, or know someone who is familiar with them.
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> In a couple of cases, I?m surprised the institutions didn?t get hit by
                    >> a lawsuit. Not that I thought they were responsible, but even if the
                    >> lawsuit was thrown out, the cost of defending and the adverse
                    >> publicity those individuals could have created if the right person had
                    >> gone to the news media is something to think about.
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> In order to get my adjunct teaching slot, I had to really overkill. I
                    >> was a very active student in my Master?s program with a lot of
                    >> professional experience. I was the student who went to the
                    >> conferences, took any chance to do guest lecturer stints, etc.
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> Is all that worth it for a career in teaching? Not with what you get
                    >> paid if you have a Master?s and are teaching as an adjunct. Do I
                    >> think a lot of it is necessary? I sure do. You can?t put someone in
                    >> a position of trust and responsibility like that without knowing what
                    >> they bring to the table.
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> People with Masters? degrees are, relative to the teaching needs of
                    >> most colleges and universities, a dime a dozen. Is it fair that
                    >> someone with an MA/MS and lots of career experience can?t get into a
                    >> permanent position in academia? Not really. If my college offered me
                    >> a chance to change careers and become some sort of ?senior
                    >> instructor?, paid less than tenure-track professors, but enough to pay
                    >> my bills, I might consider it.
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> Academia really handicaps itself by presuming that the only people
                    >> worth keeping around are those who play ?the game? of having a
                    >> doctorate and getting published. There are a lot of us who have
                    >> plenty to offer who would love to spend our retirements on campus or
                    >> make a second career of teaching, if we could get enough to pay our bills.
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> -earlcapps
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> *From:* americancomm@yahoogroups.com
                    >> [mailto:americancomm@yahoogroups.com] *On Behalf Of *Melanie Salome
                    >> *Sent:* Sunday, October 11, 2009 12:39 PM
                    >> *To:* American Communication Association
                    >> *Subject:* [americancomm] Obtaining a Teaching Position
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> Hi All,
                    >>
                    >> I want to thank you for your responses. They are both insightful and
                    >> helpful.
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> We consider this time in our lives a great opportunity to actually
                    >> pursue what we want to do. We were not happy in the financial
                    >> services industry and this layoff was just another sign that we should
                    >> be pursuing our dreams. We are in our mid 40's so it is a good time
                    >> to consider a new career path and make positive changes.
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> If we move west, there is no risk of my husband not finishing his
                    >> Doctorate because his program is primarily online at the University of
                    >> Maryland. They have 3 residencies on campus throughout the year but
                    >> the rest is online, so he will be finishing by the end of 2010. As
                    >> for me, my search is for an adjunct position right now or perhaps in a
                    >> community/junior college setting. My goal is to pursue my PhD once my
                    >> husband is finished with his terminal degree.
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> I found what Tejinder mentioned regarding knowing someone in order to
                    >> get a position is true in any industry. The academic world seems like
                    >> a club similar to most professions where the politics is a factor.
                    >> Dale also had a good comment regarding just having 'a warm body' to
                    >> fill a position. In an area like Boston, there is a plethora of warm
                    >> bodies out here right now and that is the problem. They are going to
                    >> select those that fit 10 out of the 10 requirements, and not settle
                    >> for those who have 9 out of the 10. I believe in areas such as Iowa,
                    >> they are more grateful of the warm body to fill a position but not so
                    >> much out here in the Northeast.
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> We are both open to opportunities around the country at this point but
                    >> we have our sites set on the west Texas and New Mexico area right now.
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> Again, thank you for your information and valuable insight. It is
                    >> much appreciated!
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> Melanie
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> /Melanie R. Salome/
                    >>
                    >> /mrsblue9@... <mailto:mrsblue9@...>/
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >
                    >

                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.