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In the interest of inclusion

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  • drannrosenthal
    For the most part I agree with Ty s last post, except for the part where he resigns (not acceptable) and that two conversations-- separate and unequal--are
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 24, 2006
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      For the most part I agree with Ty's last post, except for the part
      where he resigns (not acceptable) and that two conversations--
      separate and unequal--are happening. We do have a virtual board
      meeting in progress, but only four board members have participated
      since it began last Thursday. The subject was brought up by e-mail,
      creating an ACA wiki, and I asked that it be moved to a formal
      meeting so we could proceed to action or inaction. Soooo, in the
      interest of inclusion, I am wondering what your thoughts are. Boke, I
      would especially appreciate knowing your vision.

      The context: Last September, Ty and I met with other officers and
      directors of US communication associations in Washington, DC. Each
      organization was asked to explain their unique portfolio, although I
      prefer the word venue here. Ours, I said, is virtuality. We began as
      a virtual organization, and we explore the virtual venue. For us the
      Internet is not just an intellectual playground nor merely a source
      of information. It is as real a space as Kansas or Arizona or the
      Ukraine or Tel Aviv or Mars or quantum reality. Venue is a wonderful
      word to bring to virtuality because it means the place where an event
      allegedly took place, usually an event that results in legal action.
      The actions we take in ACA have resulted in our incorporation (a
      legal action thanks to Prof. Steve Smith then Prof. Dale Cyphert, et
      al). We are socioforming this new realm--shaping this new space into
      a place where humans can form social organizations. These new
      organizations differ significantly from those in the physical world,
      and ACA studies these organizations and the processes by which they
      happen and the people who inhabit them (all as communication
      processes and behaviors).

      Those of us who have limitations that prevent travelling to interact
      with others can have meaningful relationships through virtual
      connectivity. We can discover, create, and even produce here. Harvard
      University's project--the Berkman Center for the Internet and Society
      (http://cyber.harvard.edu), The Development Gateway
      (http://developmentgateway.org/), and The Internet Society
      (http://isoc.org/) all represent unique use of this virtual venue.

      We have pioneers who began this exploration; Gerald M. Phillips and
      Michael Calvin McGee were early explorers in this realm, and their
      deaths did not eliminate their presence from this virtual world.
      Archived essays and even extant e-mail that I still read resonate
      with their wisdom .

      We, too, are explorers, not just e-mail or Internet addicts--not in
      ACA. We are searching the virtual horizons, seeking out new
      knowledge, going beyond the confines of physical limitations.

      In July I will "retire" from teaching just as I have "retired" from
      the military. This does not mean I will quit my exploration of this
      realm, one that I began in November 1967, when I got my first
      electronic message.

      Make no mistake: what we do here in ACA is important, and we are each
      important to the process. Real affiliations do not matter here; what
      matters is expression of thoughts and interactions and exchanges,
      and, yes, even conflicts. We are solution oriented; we are social
      engineers, solving the problems that the social scientists amongst us
      identify, and building on their discoveries of human abilities.

      Do you know the apochryphal story about Christopher Wren, the great
      English architect(1632-1723)? A stone mason, covered in filth from
      hard work laboring on a particularly difficult stone, was approached
      by a well dressed gentleman who asked the stone mason what he was
      working on. Instead of explaining the esoteric process of smoothing
      and shaping the stone that was to be fitted into a specific place in
      the building, the stone mason stood up, wiped himself off, stepped
      back, and gestured toward the growing edifice. "Why, sir, Mr.
      Christopher Wren and I are building a great cathedral!" The
      questioner was Christopher Wren.

      You are not just posting e-mail and responses to e-mail here. You are
      word and image and code masons building a great new world; a virtual
      world where things may only "allegedly" occur but spreading those
      ideas beyond the edge of human temporal and physical confines.

      About four or five years so, I told one of our founders that I no
      longer wanted to be on the board of directors but had been
      unsuccessful in my personal attempts at recruiting new ACA
      leadership. Among other sage advice he gave me was that he believed I
      should feel no personal obligation, having made a contribution, and
      that ACA, a toddler, was going to walk on its own or not. During
      these few years, Jim Owen, Paul Barefield, Ty Adams, Dale Cyphert,
      and Jon Radwan have been the lifeblood of this organization, behind
      the scenes. Many others have come and gone, not finding ACA an
      appropriate venue for their personal goals and ambitions. Perhaps Ty
      is right that we do need to move more of our administrative minutiae
      to the public realm in the spirit of inclusion.

      I am humbled to be a Member of this organization.

      Ann Rosenthal
      Member, ACA
    • humphrey_vernon
      Ty did make some good points and I agree he should not resign but alas it is his option. It seems from my vantage point we have many members and few active
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 24, 2006
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        Ty did make some good points and I agree he should not resign
        but alas it is his option. It seems from my vantage point we have
        many members and few active members. As my last post stated I have
        little experience and am using this organization as a source for
        learning.
        I once had a professor tell me to never give my services away
        because if the recipient does not have anything invested he/she does
        not feel a loss if things do not work out. I thought that was a
        cynical view until I saw people in this group not participating
        because they were not invested. Ty and the executive committee have
        invested much time and recourses to promoting the ACA. In return
        they are met with whining and selfish responses.
        I am guilty of taking and not giving because I felt I did not
        have anything to give to the group, but now I realize each of us has
        something to give if we try. The organization will not grow or
        survive if everyone continues to take from the resources and only a
        few replenish the supply. This group is a renewable resource if the
        members give as well take.


        Vern


        <dr.ann.rosenthal@g...> wrote:
        >
        > For the most part I agree with Ty's last post, except for the part
        > where he resigns (not acceptable) and that two conversations--
        > separate and unequal--are happening. We do have a virtual board
        > meeting in progress, but only four board members have participated
        > since it began last Thursday. The subject was brought up by e-mail,
        > creating an ACA wiki, and I asked that it be moved to a formal
        > meeting so we could proceed to action or inaction. Soooo, in the
        > interest of inclusion, I am wondering what your thoughts are. Boke,
        I
        > would especially appreciate knowing your vision.
        >
        > The context: Last September, Ty and I met with other officers and
        > directors of US communication associations in Washington, DC. Each
        > organization was asked to explain their unique portfolio, although
        I
        > prefer the word venue here. Ours, I said, is virtuality. We began
        as
        > a virtual organization, and we explore the virtual venue. For us
        the
        > Internet is not just an intellectual playground nor merely a source
        > of information. It is as real a space as Kansas or Arizona or the
        > Ukraine or Tel Aviv or Mars or quantum reality. Venue is a
        wonderful
        > word to bring to virtuality because it means the place where an
        event
        > allegedly took place, usually an event that results in legal
        action.
        > The actions we take in ACA have resulted in our incorporation (a
        > legal action thanks to Prof. Steve Smith then Prof. Dale Cyphert,
        et
        > al). We are socioforming this new realm--shaping this new space
        into
        > a place where humans can form social organizations. These new
        > organizations differ significantly from those in the physical
        world,
        > and ACA studies these organizations and the processes by which they
        > happen and the people who inhabit them (all as communication
        > processes and behaviors).
        >
        > Those of us who have limitations that prevent travelling to
        interact
        > with others can have meaningful relationships through virtual
        > connectivity. We can discover, create, and even produce here.
        Harvard
        > University's project--the Berkman Center for the Internet and
        Society
        > (http://cyber.harvard.edu), The Development Gateway
        > (http://developmentgateway.org/), and The Internet Society
        > (http://isoc.org/) all represent unique use of this virtual venue.
        >
        > We have pioneers who began this exploration; Gerald M. Phillips and
        > Michael Calvin McGee were early explorers in this realm, and their
        > deaths did not eliminate their presence from this virtual world.
        > Archived essays and even extant e-mail that I still read resonate
        > with their wisdom .
        >
        > We, too, are explorers, not just e-mail or Internet addicts--not in
        > ACA. We are searching the virtual horizons, seeking out new
        > knowledge, going beyond the confines of physical limitations.
        >
        > In July I will "retire" from teaching just as I have "retired" from
        > the military. This does not mean I will quit my exploration of this
        > realm, one that I began in November 1967, when I got my first
        > electronic message.
        >
        > Make no mistake: what we do here in ACA is important, and we are
        each
        > important to the process. Real affiliations do not matter here;
        what
        > matters is expression of thoughts and interactions and exchanges,
        > and, yes, even conflicts. We are solution oriented; we are social
        > engineers, solving the problems that the social scientists amongst
        us
        > identify, and building on their discoveries of human abilities.
        >
        > Do you know the apochryphal story about Christopher Wren, the great
        > English architect(1632-1723)? A stone mason, covered in filth from
        > hard work laboring on a particularly difficult stone, was
        approached
        > by a well dressed gentleman who asked the stone mason what he was
        > working on. Instead of explaining the esoteric process of smoothing
        > and shaping the stone that was to be fitted into a specific place
        in
        > the building, the stone mason stood up, wiped himself off, stepped
        > back, and gestured toward the growing edifice. "Why, sir, Mr.
        > Christopher Wren and I are building a great cathedral!" The
        > questioner was Christopher Wren.
        >
        > You are not just posting e-mail and responses to e-mail here. You
        are
        > word and image and code masons building a great new world; a
        virtual
        > world where things may only "allegedly" occur but spreading those
        > ideas beyond the edge of human temporal and physical confines.
        >
        > About four or five years so, I told one of our founders that I no
        > longer wanted to be on the board of directors but had been
        > unsuccessful in my personal attempts at recruiting new ACA
        > leadership. Among other sage advice he gave me was that he believed
        I
        > should feel no personal obligation, having made a contribution, and
        > that ACA, a toddler, was going to walk on its own or not. During
        > these few years, Jim Owen, Paul Barefield, Ty Adams, Dale Cyphert,
        > and Jon Radwan have been the lifeblood of this organization, behind
        > the scenes. Many others have come and gone, not finding ACA an
        > appropriate venue for their personal goals and ambitions. Perhaps
        Ty
        > is right that we do need to move more of our administrative
        minutiae
        > to the public realm in the spirit of inclusion.
        >
        > I am humbled to be a Member of this organization.
        >
        > Ann Rosenthal
        > Member, ACA
        >
      • Julie Heindel
        Well, I have been a member for just over a week and still do not have a good picture or sampling of what a normal conversation flow is like in this type
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 24, 2006
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          Well, I have been a member for just over a week and still do not have a good picture or sampling of what a "normal" conversation flow is like in this type forum.  I did not get a rule book or directions :).
           
          I joined the forum to gain new perspectives on professional communication in a variety of work genres, and as a resource for sharing knowledge and insight.  I was hoping it would be a fun/safe forum for mentoring and learning 

          I am a college senior - new to this type of communication, but willing to share my thoughts, opinions and ideas.  I wish I had the skills to manage a website...someday hopefully, but not yet - sorry!
           

          humphrey_vernon <humphrey_vernon@...> wrote:
               Ty did make some good points and I agree he should not resign
          but alas it is his option.  It seems from my vantage point we have
          many members and few active members.  As my last post stated I have
          little experience and am using this organization as a source for
          learning. 
               I once had a professor tell me to never give my services away
          because if the recipient does not have anything invested he/she does
          not feel a loss if things do not work out.  I thought that was a
          cynical view until I saw people in this group not participating
          because they were not invested.  Ty and the executive committee have
          invested much time and recourses to promoting the ACA.  In return
          they are met with whining and selfish responses. 
               I am guilty of taking and not giving because I felt I did not
          have anything to give to the group, but now I realize each of us has
          something to give if we try.  The organization will not grow or
          survive if everyone continues to take from the resources and only a
          few replenish the supply.  This group is a renewable resource if the
          members give as well take.


          Vern


          <dr.ann.rosenthal@g...> wrote:
          >
          > For the most part I agree with Ty's last post, except for the part
          > where he resigns (not acceptable) and that two conversations--
          > separate and unequal--are happening. We do have a virtual board
          > meeting in progress, but only four board members have participated
          > since it began last Thursday. The subject was brought up by e-mail,
          > creating an ACA wiki, and I asked that it be moved to a formal
          > meeting so we could proceed to action or inaction. Soooo, in the
          > interest of inclusion, I am wondering what your thoughts are. Boke,
          I
          > would especially appreciate knowing your vision.
          >
          > The context: Last September, Ty and I met with other officers and
          > directors of US communication associations in Washington, DC. Each
          > organization was asked to explain their unique portfolio, although
          I
          > prefer the word venue here. Ours, I said, is virtuality. We began
          as
          > a virtual organization, and we explore the virtual venue. For us
          the
          > Internet is not just an intellectual playground nor merely a source
          > of information. It is as real a space as Kansas or Arizona or the
          > Ukraine or Tel Aviv or Mars or quantum reality. Venue is a
          wonderful
          > word to bring to virtuality because it means the place where an
          event
          > allegedly took place, usually an event that results in legal
          action.
          > The actions we take in ACA have resulted in our incorporation (a
          > legal action thanks to Prof. Steve Smith then Prof. Dale Cyphert,
          et
          > al). We are socioforming this new realm--shaping this new space
          into
          > a place where humans can form social organizations. These new
          > organizations differ significantly from those in the physical
          world,
          > and ACA studies these organizations and the processes by which they
          > happen and the people who inhabit them (all as communication
          > processes and behaviors).
          >
          > Those of us who have limitations that prevent travelling to
          interact
          > with others can have meaningful relationships through virtual
          > connectivity. We can discover, create, and even produce here.
          Harvard
          > University's project--the Berkman Center for the Internet and
          Society
          > (http://cyber.harvard.edu), The Development Gateway
          > (http://developmentgateway.org/), and The Internet Society
          > (http://isoc.org/) all represent unique use of this virtual venue.
          >
          > We have pioneers who began this exploration; Gerald M. Phillips and
          > Michael Calvin McGee were early explorers in this realm, and their
          > deaths did not eliminate their presence from this virtual world.
          > Archived essays and even extant e-mail that I still read resonate
          > with their wisdom .
          >
          > We, too, are explorers, not just e-mail or Internet addicts--not in
          > ACA. We are searching the virtual horizons, seeking out new
          > knowledge, going beyond the confines of physical limitations.
          >
          > In July I will "retire" from teaching just as I have "retired" from
          > the military. This does not mean I will quit my exploration of this
          > realm, one that I began in November 1967, when I got my first
          > electronic message.
          >
          > Make no mistake: what we do here in ACA is important, and we are
          each
          > important to the process. Real affiliations do not matter here;
          what
          > matters is expression of thoughts and interactions and exchanges,
          > and, yes, even conflicts. We are solution oriented; we are social
          > engineers, solving the problems that the social scientists amongst
          us
          > identify, and building on their discoveries of human abilities.
          >
          > Do you know the apochryphal story about Christopher Wren, the great
          > English architect(1632-1723)? A stone mason, covered in filth from
          > hard work laboring on a particularly difficult stone, was
          approached
          > by a well dressed gentleman who asked the stone mason what he was
          > working on. Instead of explaining the esoteric process of smoothing
          > and shaping the stone that was to be fitted into a specific place
          in
          > the building, the stone mason stood up, wiped himself off, stepped
          > back, and gestured toward the growing edifice. "Why, sir, Mr.
          > Christopher Wren and I are building a great cathedral!" The
          > questioner was Christopher Wren.
          >
          > You are not just posting e-mail and responses to e-mail here. You
          are
          > word and image and code masons building a great new world; a
          virtual
          > world where things may only "allegedly" occur but spreading those
          > ideas beyond the edge of human temporal and physical confines.
          >
          > About four or five years so, I told one of our founders that I no
          > longer wanted to be on the board of directors but had been
          > unsuccessful in my personal attempts at recruiting new ACA
          > leadership. Among other sage advice he gave me was that he believed
          I
          > should feel no personal obligation, having made a contribution, and
          > that ACA, a toddler, was going to walk on its own or not. During
          > these few years, Jim Owen, Paul Barefield, Ty Adams, Dale Cyphert,
          > and Jon Radwan have been the lifeblood of this organization, behind
          > the scenes. Many others have come and gone, not finding ACA an
          > appropriate venue for their personal goals and ambitions. Perhaps
          Ty
          > is right that we do need to move more of our administrative
          minutiae
          > to the public realm in the spirit of inclusion.
          >
          > I am humbled to be a Member of this organization.
          >
          > Ann Rosenthal
          > Member, ACA
          >







          Julie
        • Brian Smith
          I too am fairly new to the group. I am a fairly young guy in Corporate America and have seen first-hand that healthy communication can help grow your
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 24, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            I too am fairly new to the group.  I am a fairly young guy in "Corporate America" and have seen first-hand that healthy communication can help grow your business (or the lack thereof can cause problems).  I look forward to talking to you and establishing new relationships.
             
            brian 


            From: americancomm@yahoogroups.com [mailto:americancomm@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Julie Heindel
            Sent: Tuesday, January 24, 2006 4:01 PM
            To: americancomm@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [americancomm] Re: In the interest of inclusion

            Well, I have been a member for just over a week and still do not have a good picture or sampling of what a "normal" conversation flow is like in this type forum.  I did not get a rule book or directions :).
             
            I joined the forum to gain new perspectives on professional communication in a variety of work genres, and as a resource for sharing knowledge and insight.  I was hoping it would be a fun/safe forum for mentoring and learning 

            I am a college senior - new to this type of communication, but willing to share my thoughts, opinions and ideas.  I wish I had the skills to manage a website...someday hopefully, but not yet - sorry!
             

            humphrey_vernon <humphrey_vernon@...> wrote:
                 Ty did make some good points and I agree he should not resign
            but alas it is his option.  It seems from my vantage point we have
            many members and few active members.  As my last post stated I have
            little experience and am using this organization as a source for
            learning. 
                 I once had a professor tell me to never give my services away
            because if the recipient does not have anything invested he/she does
            not feel a loss if things do not work out.  I thought that was a
            cynical view until I saw people in this group not participating
            because they were not invested.  Ty and the executive committee have
            invested much time and recourses to promoting the ACA.  In return
            they are met with whining and selfish responses. 
                 I am guilty of taking and not giving because I felt I did not
            have anything to give to the group, but now I realize each of us has
            something to give if we try.  The organization will not grow or
            survive if everyone continues to take from the resources and only a
            few replenish the supply.  This group is a renewable resource if the
            members give as well take.


            Vern


            <dr.ann.rosenthal@g...> wrote:
            >
            > For the most part I agree with Ty's last post, except for the part
            > where he resigns (not acceptable) and that two conversations--
            > separate and unequal--are happening. We do have a virtual board
            > meeting in progress, but only four board members have participated
            > since it began last Thursday. The subject was brought up by e-mail,
            > creating an ACA wiki, and I asked that it be moved to a formal
            > meeting so we could proceed to action or inaction. Soooo, in the
            > interest of inclusion, I am wondering what your thoughts are. Boke,
            I
            > would especially appreciate knowing your vision.
            >
            > The context: Last September, Ty and I met with other officers and
            > directors of US communication associations in Washington, DC. Each
            > organization was asked to explain their unique portfolio, although
            I
            > prefer the word venue here. Ours, I said, is virtuality. We began
            as
            > a virtual organization, and we explore the virtual venue. For us
            the
            > Internet is not just an intellectual playground nor merely a source
            > of information. It is as real a space as Kansas or Arizona or the
            > Ukraine or Tel Aviv or Mars or quantum reality. Venue is a
            wonderful
            > word to bring to virtuality because it means the place where an
            event
            > allegedly took place, usually an event that results in legal
            action.
            > The actions we take in ACA have resulted in our incorporation (a
            > legal action thanks to Prof. Steve Smith then Prof. Dale Cyphert,
            et
            > al). We are socioforming this new realm--shaping this new space
            into
            > a place where humans can form social organizations. These new
            > organizations differ significantly from those in the physical
            world,
            > and ACA studies these organizations and the processes by which they
            > happen and the people who inhabit them (all as communication
            > processes and behaviors).
            >
            > Those of us who have limitations that prevent travelling to
            interact
            > with others can have meaningful relationships through virtual
            > connectivity. We can discover, create, and even produce here.
            Harvard
            > University's project--the Berkman Center for the Internet and
            Society
            > (http://cyber.harvard.edu), The Development Gateway
            > (http://developmentgateway.org/), and The Internet Society
            > (http://isoc.org/) all represent unique use of this virtual venue.
            >
            > We have pioneers who began this exploration; Gerald M. Phillips and
            > Michael Calvin McGee were early explorers in this realm, and their
            > deaths did not eliminate their presence from this virtual world.
            > Archived essays and even extant e-mail that I still read resonate
            > with their wisdom .
            >
            > We, too, are explorers, not just e-mail or Internet addicts--not in
            > ACA. We are searching the virtual horizons, seeking out new
            > knowledge, going beyond the confines of physical limitations.
            >
            > In July I will "retire" from teaching just as I have "retired" from
            > the military. This does not mean I will quit my exploration of this
            > realm, one that I began in November 1967, when I got my first
            > electronic message.
            >
            > Make no mistake: what we do here in ACA is important, and we are
            each
            > important to the process. Real affiliations do not matter here;
            what
            > matters is expression of thoughts and interactions and exchanges,
            > and, yes, even conflicts. We are solution oriented; we are social
            > engineers, solving the problems that the social scientists amongst
            us
            > identify, and building on their discoveries of human abilities.
            >
            > Do you know the apochryphal story about Christopher Wren, the great
            > English architect(1632-1723)? A stone mason, covered in filth from
            > hard work laboring on a particularly difficult stone, was
            approached
            > by a well dressed gentleman who asked the stone mason what he was
            > working on. Instead of explaining the esoteric process of smoothing
            > and shaping the stone that was to be fitted into a specific place
            in
            > the building, the stone mason stood up, wiped himself off, stepped
            > back, and gestured toward the growing edifice. "Why, sir, Mr.
            > Christopher Wren and I are building a great cathedral!" The
            > questioner was Christopher Wren.
            >
            > You are not just posting e-mail and responses to e-mail here. You
            are
            > word and image and code masons building a great new world; a
            virtual
            > world where things may only "allegedly" occur but spreading those
            > ideas beyond the edge of human temporal and physical confines.
            >
            > About four or five years so, I told one of our founders that I no
            > longer wanted to be on the board of directors but had been
            > unsuccessful in my personal attempts at recruiting new ACA
            > leadership. Among other sage advice he gave me was that he believed
            I
            > should feel no personal obligation, having made a contribution, and
            > that ACA, a toddler, was going to walk on its own or not. During
            > these few years, Jim Owen, Paul Barefield, Ty Adams, Dale Cyphert,
            > and Jon Radwan have been the lifeblood of this organization, behind
            > the scenes. Many others have come and gone, not finding ACA an
            > appropriate venue for their personal goals and ambitions. Perhaps
            Ty
            > is right that we do need to move more of our administrative
            minutiae
            > to the public realm in the spirit of inclusion.
            >
            > I am humbled to be a Member of this organization.
            >
            > Ann Rosenthal
            > Member, ACA
            >







            Julie
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