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Re: [americancomm] Nice article

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  • paul barefield
    good piece. thanks. paul
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 13, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      good piece. thanks. paul
      On Tuesday, February 13, 2007, at 10:38 AM, Tyrone Adams, Ph.D. wrote:

      >  
      > Open season for researchers
      >
      > Pressure is growing for academic publishers to put the fruits of
      > publicly funded labour on the web
      >
      > Jessica Shepherd
      > Tuesday February 13, 2007
      >
      > Guardian
      >
      > "Ours is the best of businesses: we get our raw material for free and
      > our customers pay us a year in advance," joked the publisher of an
      > academic journal to a university researcher.
      >
      > Perhaps not for much longer. Momentum is growing for publicly funded
      > published academic research to be available free on the internet.
      > So-called "open access" would mean anyone could view an article in a
      > scholarly journal shortly after it was published.
      >
      > Most academic publishers are not pleased. This would sharply cut their
      > subscriptions, the "customers who pay a year in advance". Some even
      > fear it could make them bankrupt.
      >
      > This week publishers, researchers and research funders from across
      > Europe will debate the issue in Brussels at a conference hosted by the
      > European commission.
      >
      > "We are at tipping point," says Peter Burnhill, director of a national
      > data centre that serves UK universities and colleges. "There is a
      > movement towards open access and this conference, 'Scientific
      > publishing in the European research area', might make the difference."
      >
      > Up until now, university libraries have subscribed to journals, giving
      > their academics access either online or in print. But libraries
      > increasingly do not have the funds or choose not to subscribe to
      > certain journals. Academics may therefore be unable to see research
      > papers crucial to their work. The general public, and even some
      > academics, who are not part of a university cannot see the fruits of
      > publicly funded published research without subscribing to journals.
      >
      > Open access would change this. Its advocates propose two models. The
      > first is a system in which the author of an academic paper pays a
      > journal publisher for his or her peers to review the research, and for
      > the publishing team to edit the work and market the research. In
      > reality, it is not the academic who would pay but the organisation
      > that funds the research, such as the British Heart Foundation or a
      > research council. The Public Library of Science, the US-based
      > publisher of scientific and medical journals, announced it would adopt
      > this model in 2002 to give its scientists more choice and control over
      > the way their work was published.
      >
      > The second is a system in which an academic posts his or her research
      > paper on the university's database - known as a repository - for all
      > academics and the general public to see via the internet once the
      > paper has been accepted by a journal. This is known as "author
      > archiving".
      >
      > Already more than 19,000 scholars have signed a petition to urge the
      > European commission in favour of open access. They include Nobel
      > laureates Harold Varmus and Richard Roberts, and the Wellcome Trust,
      > the world's largest medical research charity.
      >
      > Wellcome's head of e-strategy, Robert Kiley, says: "We believe that
      > the dissemination of research is just part of the research process. We
      > give an academic a grant and pay for their time, accommodation and
      > test-tubes. It seems strange, then, that after a year or two, the
      > outcome is an article which the academic gives to a publisher and
      > which we then have to buy back."
      >
      > Ian Gibson, chairman of the science and technology select committee,
      > says the whole idea of research is to engage the public and this is
      > something that can only be properly done with open access. "We should
      > never underestimate how much the public wants to know the conclusions
      > of particular academic research at first hand," he says. "Academics
      > have got to start engaging with the world, not just 12 or 13 other
      > people interested in their field."
      >
      > Professor Nicholas Mann, dean of the School of Advanced Study at the
      > University of London, has signed the petition. He points out that the
      > internet has provided the technical means for open access. "The
      > majority of academics are only too happy to share their research more
      > widely with the public and each other."
      >
      > Most also believe it is their duty to help those in developing
      > countries who cannot afford journal subscriptions to enjoy the fruits
      > of academic labour.
      >
      > But traditional journal publishers argue that open access would
      > trigger a dramatic drop in subscriptions, especially for
      > subject-specific journals published by learned societies such as the
      > London Mathematical Society. They say the societies, which rely on
      > revenues from journals, could collapse in the long-term and
      > haemorrhage readers in the short-term.
      >
      > The publishers also argue that open access is associated with research
      > that has not been peer-reviewed and that this could be damage the
      > reputation of research freely available on the web.
      >
      > Susan Hezlet, publisher of the London Mathematical Society's journals,
      > says: "If all publicly funded published research was made available
      > free on the internet, publishers would all go bust and no one would
      > manage the peer review, editing and distribution processes. We would
      > be forced to wind down what we do in terms of supporting and
      > disseminating mathematics. The losers would be the mathematical
      > community and those who believe that supporting this culture is
      > important."
      >
      > Ian Russell, head of the Association of Learned and Professional
      > Society Publishers, says: "Even open access lobbyists agree that
      > author archiving will cause subscription cancellations and journals to
      > go out of business. That's trouble because currently it is the
      > journals that provide the quality control and give authority to the
      > literature. Some learned societies would go bankrupt with open access.
      > Others would have to radically reduce the work they do due to the dent
      > in their income."
      >
      > Pity for the journals and their publishers has been thin on the
      > ground. The European Research Council has argued that the high price
      > of scientific journals was "impeding scientific progress".
      >
      > And last year the European commission published an independent report
      > showing the price of scientific journals had risen 200%-300% beyond
      > inflation between 1975 and 1995. The market, the study said, was worth
      > up to $11bn (£5.6bn) a year.
      >
      > Some major commercial publishers are softening to the idea of open
      > access. Reed Elsevier, the world's largest scientific publisher, has
      > agreed to allow contributors to post articles on their own websites.
      >
      > Nick Fowler, director of strategy at Elsevier, says: "Publishers are
      > open to and are continually exploring different models, together with
      > the research communities we serve. For example, last year 41 of our
      > journals began offering authors the option to sponsor unlimited access
      > to their articles.
      >
      > So the daggers are drawn for this week's conference. "I think the
      > losers need to be able to lose gracefully and feel that they have been
      > given the chance to speak," says Burnhill.
      >

      >
      >
      > --
      > Tyrone L. Adams, Ph.D.
      > Richard D'Aquin Associate Professor of Journalism and Communications
      > Department of Communication
      > http://comm.louisiana.edu
      > University of Louisiana at Lafayette
      > P.O. Box 43650
      > Lafayette, LA USA 70504
      > Direct Phone: 337.482.6077
      > Facsimile: 337.482.6104
      > http://www.swampboy.com/
      >
      > "One can resist the invasion of an army
      > but one cannot resist the invasion of
      > ideas."    --Victor Hugo
      >
    • humphrey_vernon@colstate.edu
      It will be interesting to see the outcome. Vern ... From: paul barefield Date: Tuesday, February 13, 2007 12:02 pm Subject: Re:
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 13, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        It will be interesting to see the outcome.

        Vern



        ----- Original Message -----
        From: paul barefield <csbarefield@...>
        Date: Tuesday, February 13, 2007 12:02 pm
        Subject: Re: [americancomm] Nice article

        > good piece. thanks. paul
        > On Tuesday, February 13, 2007, at 10:38 AM, Tyrone Adams, Ph.D.
        wrote:
        >
        > >  
        > > Open season for researchers
        > >
        > > Pressure is growing for academic publishers to put the fruits of
        > > publicly funded labour on the web
        > >
        > > Jessica Shepherd
        > > Tuesday February 13, 2007
        > >
        > > Guardian
        > >
        > > "Ours is the best of businesses: we get our raw material for
        > free and
        > > our customers pay us a year in advance," joked the publisher of
        > an
        > > academic journal to a university researcher.
        > >
        > > Perhaps not for much longer. Momentum is growing for publicly
        > funded
        > > published academic research to be available free on the
        > internet.
        > > So-called "open access" would mean anyone could view an article
        > in a
        > > scholarly journal shortly after it was published.
        > >
        > > Most academic publishers are not pleased. This would sharply cut
        > their
        > > subscriptions, the "customers who pay a year in advance". Some
        > even
        > > fear it could make them bankrupt.
        > >
        > > This week publishers, researchers and research funders from
        > across
        > > Europe will debate the issue in Brussels at a conference hosted
        > by the
        > > European commission.
        > >
        > > "We are at tipping point," says Peter Burnhill, director of a
        > national
        > > data centre that serves UK universities and colleges. "There is
        > a
        > > movement towards open access and this conference, 'Scientific
        > > publishing in the European research area', might make the
        > difference.">
        > > Up until now, university libraries have subscribed to journals,
        > giving
        > > their academics access either online or in print. But libraries
        > > increasingly do not have the funds or choose not to subscribe to
        > > certain journals. Academics may therefore be unable to see
        > research
        > > papers crucial to their work. The general public, and even some
        > > academics, who are not part of a university cannot see the
        > fruits of
        > > publicly funded published research without subscribing to journals.
        > >
        > > Open access would change this. Its advocates propose two models.
        > The
        > > first is a system in which the author of an academic paper pays
        > a
        > > journal publisher for his or her peers to review the research,
        > and for
        > > the publishing team to edit the work and market the research. In
        > > reality, it is not the academic who would pay but the
        > organisation
        > > that funds the research, such as the British Heart Foundation or
        > a
        > > research council. The Public Library of Science, the US-based
        > > publisher of scientific and medical journals, announced it would
        > adopt
        > > this model in 2002 to give its scientists more choice and
        > control over
        > > the way their work was published.
        > >
        > > The second is a system in which an academic posts his or her
        > research
        > > paper on the university's database - known as a repository - for
        > all
        > > academics and the general public to see via the internet once
        > the
        > > paper has been accepted by a journal. This is known as "author
        > > archiving".
        > >
        > > Already more than 19,000 scholars have signed a petition to urge
        > the
        > > European commission in favour of open access. They include Nobel
        > > laureates Harold Varmus and Richard Roberts, and the Wellcome
        > Trust,
        > > the world's largest medical research charity.
        > >
        > > Wellcome's head of e-strategy, Robert Kiley, says: "We believe
        > that
        > > the dissemination of research is just part of the research
        > process. We
        > > give an academic a grant and pay for their time, accommodation
        > and
        > > test-tubes. It seems strange, then, that after a year or two,
        > the
        > > outcome is an article which the academic gives to a publisher
        > and
        > > which we then have to buy back."
        > >
        > > Ian Gibson, chairman of the science and technology select
        > committee,
        > > says the whole idea of research is to engage the public and this
        > is
        > > something that can only be properly done with open access. "We
        > should
        > > never underestimate how much the public wants to know the
        > conclusions
        > > of particular academic research at first hand," he says.
        > "Academics
        > > have got to start engaging with the world, not just 12 or 13
        > other
        > > people interested in their field."
        > >
        > > Professor Nicholas Mann, dean of the School of Advanced Study at
        > the
        > > University of London, has signed the petition. He points out
        > that the
        > > internet has provided the technical means for open access. "The
        > > majority of academics are only too happy to share their research
        > more
        > > widely with the public and each other."
        > >
        > > Most also believe it is their duty to help those in developing
        > > countries who cannot afford journal subscriptions to enjoy the
        > fruits
        > > of academic labour.
        > >
        > > But traditional journal publishers argue that open access would
        > > trigger a dramatic drop in subscriptions, especially for
        > > subject-specific journals published by learned societies such as
        > the
        > > London Mathematical Society. They say the societies, which rely
        > on
        > > revenues from journals, could collapse in the long-term and
        > > haemorrhage readers in the short-term.
        > >
        > > The publishers also argue that open access is associated with
        > research
        > > that has not been peer-reviewed and that this could be damage
        > the
        > > reputation of research freely available on the web.
        > >
        > > Susan Hezlet, publisher of the London Mathematical Society's
        > journals,
        > > says: "If all publicly funded published research was made
        > available
        > > free on the internet, publishers would all go bust and no one
        > would
        > > manage the peer review, editing and distribution processes. We
        > would
        > > be forced to wind down what we do in terms of supporting and
        > > disseminating mathematics. The losers would be the mathematical
        > > community and those who believe that supporting this culture is
        > > important."
        > >
        > > Ian Russell, head of the Association of Learned and Professional
        > > Society Publishers, says: "Even open access lobbyists agree that
        > > author archiving will cause subscription cancellations and
        > journals to
        > > go out of business. That's trouble because currently it is the
        > > journals that provide the quality control and give authority to
        > the
        > > literature. Some learned societies would go bankrupt with open
        > access.
        > > Others would have to radically reduce the work they do due to
        > the dent
        > > in their income."
        > >
        > > Pity for the journals and their publishers has been thin on the
        > > ground. The European Research Council has argued that the high
        > price
        > > of scientific journals was "impeding scientific progress".
        > >
        > > And last year the European commission published an independent
        > report
        > > showing the price of scientific journals had risen 200%-300%
        > beyond
        > > inflation between 1975 and 1995. The market, the study said, was
        > worth
        > > up to $11bn (£5.6bn) a year.
        > >
        > > Some major commercial publishers are softening to the idea of
        > open
        > > access. Reed Elsevier, the world's largest scientific publisher,
        > has
        > > agreed to allow contributors to post articles on their own
        websites.
        > >
        > > Nick Fowler, director of strategy at Elsevier, says: "Publishers
        > are
        > > open to and are continually exploring different models, together
        > with
        > > the research communities we serve. For example, last year 41 of
        > our
        > > journals began offering authors the option to sponsor unlimited
        > access
        > > to their articles.
        > >
        > > So the daggers are drawn for this week's conference. "I think
        > the
        > > losers need to be able to lose gracefully and feel that they
        > have been
        > > given the chance to speak," says Burnhill.
        > >
        >
        > >
        > >
        > > --
        > > Tyrone L. Adams, Ph.D.
        > > Richard D'Aquin Associate Professor of Journalism and
        Communications
        > > Department of Communication
        > > http://comm.louisiana.edu
        > > University of Louisiana at Lafayette
        > > P.O. Box 43650
        > > Lafayette, LA USA 70504
        > > Direct Phone: 337.482.6077
        > > Facsimile: 337.482.6104
        > > http://www.swampboy.com/
        > >
        > > "One can resist the invasion of an army
        > > but one cannot resist the invasion of
        > > ideas."    --Victor Hugo
        > >
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