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[Amel] Re: Dessalator D60 amber light blinking/No water going into tank

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  • Kent
    Hi again, Gary, et al. I m on the boat again and found that the control panel is very different from what you have, Gary. Here s what I ve done: I turned the
    Message 1 of 16 , Nov 1, 2012
      Hi again, Gary, et al.
      I'm on the boat again and found that the control panel is very different from what you have, Gary. Here's what I've done:

      I turned the unit on Manual and it came on without a blinking light. After 2 minutes the green "good water" light came on. I checked the product line going to the tank and no water was flowing. The water coming from the test faucet at the control panel tested good with my hand held TDS monitor. I pushed the over ride button on the side of the diverter solenoid and water flowed to the tank. When I turned the unit on Automatic, the amber light blinked continuously and no water flowed into the tank unless I pushed the over ride button on the solenoid. The green light didn't come on after several minutes. I found a new salinity sensor (came with the boat, imagine that) and replaced the old one which looked OK...no difference. I repeated this test several times and the same thing happened each time...no blinking amber light and green light on after 2 min. when on Manual...blinking amber light for several minutes and no green light when on Automatic.

      I looked at the computer control board and the two black ?relays? say 12v, but the solenoid says 24v. The power at the solenoid is 8-10v. Should I be getting 24v at the solenoid? Seems like it should be at least 12v?
      My unit has no feed pump, it is fed by gravity. Where does the unit read "low pressure"? When on Automatic and I turn the pressure knob the pressure goes up as it should to 60 bar on the pressure meter and flow in the glass tube with float goes to 60 l/m as it should.

      Sorry for the long explanation of what is happening. Do you have any suggestions as to what might be wrong or what I should do next?

      Thanks again for your patience and help.
      Kent Robertson
      S/V Kristy 1999 Amel SuperMaramu


      --- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Kent Robertson <karkauai@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi, Gary,
      > Thanks for your prompt reply.  I won't be back to the boat for a couple more days, but this is what I remember.  I'll try what you suggest and what Martin of Dessalator Spain says to do (see below).
      > Kent
      > SM 243
      > KRISTY
      >
      > See my answers to your questions below underlined
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: amelliahona <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
      > To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Tuesday, October 30, 2012 10:42 AM
      > Subject: [Amel] Re: Dessalator D60 amber light blinking
      >
      >
      >  
      > Hi Kent:
      >
      > Bummer, to have made water for 3 hours only to have it go overboard! Or at least that sounds like where it went. My boat doesn't have a test facet on the control panel. So a question for you, Does water come out of the test faucet only when product water is being made as witnessed by the flow gauge/tube? I am trying to get a sense of how your system is plumbed. Is the diverter solenoid downstream of the test faucet or upstream of it?
      >
      > Kent: Water comes out whether the green light (good water) or amber light (bad water) is on, so I guess the diverter is after the test faucet.  The  valve in the faucet leaks, so I had to cap it off.  I'm going to have to buy a new one from Dessalator since I've been unable to find one that fits the threads elsewhere.  In the meantime I can check water quality by taking the cap off.  It will be messy, but I think I can do it without getting water everywhere.
      >
      > If your control circuit board is similar to mine, there are three control relays:
      >
      > Relay 1. Controls the BP pump (low pressure feed pump) this is "ganged" to control a larger relay that actually controls the power to the pump. Sounds like it is working ok.
      >
      > Kent: I don't have a feed pump, it's gravity fed.
      >
      > Relay 2. Controls the HP pump (high pressure pump), this also is ganged to control the larger relay that controls the feed power to the pump. Sounds like it is working ok.
      >
      > Relay 3. Controls the bypass solenoid. When the solenoid is activated product water (fresh water produced) is diverted to the tanks. On my system the default mode is bypass (i.e. the product water goes overboard). The solenoid must be electrically actuated to divert the product water to the tank. So the question is: is the solenoid itself not working or is the control circuit that actuates the solenoid not working, or is the water being lost somewhere else? 
      >
      > Kent:  There's no evidence of water anywhere else.  That amount of water should show up under the galley sink, the sump, or in the bilge in the salon.  I just heard from Martin at Dessalator Spain.  He said there's a bypass button on the 3-way valve that diverts water to the tank.  He says that valve often fails from drying out and that I can over ride it by pushing the button and turning it a bit to keep it open.  That would keep the valve open all the time, so I'd have to make sure water quality is good before over riding it.  He says sometimes it will start working correctly after doing the over ride procedure.
      >
      > The solenoid is merely a 24 Volt DC solenoid (on my system). You can test it by applying 24 VDC to its two wires. On my system they are the orange colored wires that go to pins 10 and 11 of plug 1 on the circuit board. The fuse that protects Relay 3 must be good because it is the same fuse that protects relay 1 and 2.
      >
      > I found that my system takes anywhere from 2-5 minutes to produce good water (depending on how long it has been idle). The timer on my original circuit board sent product water to the tank long before good quality water was produced, so I wired a manual switch on the solenoid circuit. When my sensor shows EC (electrical conductivity) less than 550 microSeimens I throw the switch to divert product water to the tanks. If the alarm on the EC sensor goes off, indicating EC of over 550 mS, it sounds a 110 Decibel Sonalert and I run to the galley and throw the manual switch to off. 
      > Kent: I still haven't done anything about the "sham" water quality sensor.  Was going to get started on that when these problems started.  I've been relying on testing the water coming from the test faucet to make sure the water I'm putting in the tank is good.  Once I get this straightened out I'll make the changes you suggest.
      >
      >
      > If you supply 24 VDC to the solenoid you should here it click (sometimes hard to do with the genset and HP pump running).
      >
      > You can test the solenoid in peace an quite with the genset off by:
      >
      > 1. turning on the rotary control switch (this supplies 24 VDC to the control board)
      > 2. using a multimeter check to see if you have 24 VDC on pin 10 of plug 1.
      > 3. if you have 24 VDC on that pin, then using a piece of wire, provide a ground to pin 11 of plug 1 by shorting between pin 11 and the inboard base of fuse 3 (inboard referring to the circuit board so the end towards the center of the circuit board) . You should hear the solenoid click. The solenoid is on top of the flow gauge/tube. If you can confirm the solenoid actuating, then there may be a control relay (3) issue, a stuck solenoid or some other control issue. If that is the case you can make a work around by wiring a manual control switch like I have done. If the solenoid is stuck, gently tapping it may break it loose.
      >
      > The parts location picture is in the Photos section under Amel SM Dessalator and the schematics are in the Files section.
      >
      > I hope this helps. If I can be of any further assistance please post or you can give me a call at 801-543-5801.
      >
      > All the best,
      >
      > Gary
      > Amel SM 335 s/v Liahona
      > Un-insured (due to Lemma Insurance's bankruptcy) and on the hard in Jolly Harbor, Antigua
      > Kent:  Have you made contact with the multiple recommended  insurers yet?  I'd be pretty nervous about not being insured.  Thanks again for all your help, Gary.  Wish I could watch you at work...maybe it wouldn't seem so complicated.  All your posts and photos are very helpful in identifying the parts and understanding how stuff works.  I'm still a bit timid when it comes to getting my hands on electrical gear, but once I do it things seem fairly simple most of the time.
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Kent Robertson <karkauai@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hello again, everyone,
      > > I finally got back to KRISTY last weekend.  I sailed her out into clean water and turned the 60 l/hr Dessalator water maker on.  Martin at the Spain office of Desallator said that the blinking light should just be due to low pressure.  He suggested that I turn it on and let it run for a few minutes...sure enough, after a couple of minutes of turning the pressure knob on the panel all the way up to get it into the green zone, the blinking/clicking stopped and the "float" on the panel above the sink showed that it was producing water.  The light turned green (I know, Gary, that doesn't mean it's producing good water.  I checked the water at the test faucet on the panel, and it was OK.) So I let it run for 3 hours, then shut it off as we approached the dirty water.  To my dismay, when I checked the tank level after returning to the dock, I hadn't added any water to the tank.  I think it had to be producing water since the float level was showing 60
      > > l/hr, so I guess it was just pumping it overboard.  The green light was on the whole time.  Does anyone know how I can test the valve that switches output to the tank?  Any other ideas about what might be wrong and how to troubleshoot?
      > > Thanks in advance, Gary.  I figure you know more about the Dessalator units than anyone else on the forum.
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Richard03801
      Kent we converted to manual while in St Martin working with Necol they will get rid of the old poorly done package and convert if to great working manual one.
      Message 2 of 16 , Nov 1, 2012
        Kent we converted to manual while in St Martin working with Necol they will get rid of the old poorly done package and convert if to great working manual one.

        Regards

        Richard Piller

        Cell 603 767 5330

        On Nov 1, 2012, at 20:38, "Kent" <karkauai@...> wrote:

        > Hi again, Gary, et al.
        > I'm on the boat again and found that the control panel is very different from what you have, Gary. Here's what I've done:
        >
        > I turned the unit on Manual and it came on without a blinking light. After 2 minutes the green "good water" light came on. I checked the product line going to the tank and no water was flowing. The water coming from the test faucet at the control panel tested good with my hand held TDS monitor. I pushed the over ride button on the side of the diverter solenoid and water flowed to the tank. When I turned the unit on Automatic, the amber light blinked continuously and no water flowed into the tank unless I pushed the over ride button on the solenoid. The green light didn't come on after several minutes. I found a new salinity sensor (came with the boat, imagine that) and replaced the old one which looked OK...no difference. I repeated this test several times and the same thing happened each time...no blinking amber light and green light on after 2 min. when on Manual...blinking amber light for several minutes and no green light when on Automatic.
        >
        > I looked at the computer control board and the two black ?relays? say 12v, but the solenoid says 24v. The power at the solenoid is 8-10v. Should I be getting 24v at the solenoid? Seems like it should be at least 12v?
        > My unit has no feed pump, it is fed by gravity. Where does the unit read "low pressure"? When on Automatic and I turn the pressure knob the pressure goes up as it should to 60 bar on the pressure meter and flow in the glass tube with float goes to 60 l/m as it should.
        >
        > Sorry for the long explanation of what is happening. Do you have any suggestions as to what might be wrong or what I should do next?
        >
        > Thanks again for your patience and help.
        > Kent Robertson
        > S/V Kristy 1999 Amel SuperMaramu
        >
        > --- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Kent Robertson <karkauai@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > Hi, Gary,
        > > Thanks for your prompt reply. I won't be back to the boat for a couple more days, but this is what I remember. I'll try what you suggest and what Martin of Dessalator Spain says to do (see below).
        > > Kent
        > > SM 243
        > > KRISTY
        > >
        > > See my answers to your questions below underlined
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ________________________________
        > > From: amelliahona <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
        > > To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
        > > Sent: Tuesday, October 30, 2012 10:42 AM
        > > Subject: [Amel] Re: Dessalator D60 amber light blinking
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Hi Kent:
        > >
        > > Bummer, to have made water for 3 hours only to have it go overboard! Or at least that sounds like where it went. My boat doesn't have a test facet on the control panel. So a question for you, Does water come out of the test faucet only when product water is being made as witnessed by the flow gauge/tube? I am trying to get a sense of how your system is plumbed. Is the diverter solenoid downstream of the test faucet or upstream of it?
        > >
        > > Kent: Water comes out whether the green light (good water) or amber light (bad water) is on, so I guess the diverter is after the test faucet. The valve in the faucet leaks, so I had to cap it off. I'm going to have to buy a new one from Dessalator since I've been unable to find one that fits the threads elsewhere. In the meantime I can check water quality by taking the cap off. It will be messy, but I think I can do it without getting water everywhere.
        > >
        > > If your control circuit board is similar to mine, there are three control relays:
        > >
        > > Relay 1. Controls the BP pump (low pressure feed pump) this is "ganged" to control a larger relay that actually controls the power to the pump. Sounds like it is working ok.
        > >
        > > Kent: I don't have a feed pump, it's gravity fed.
        > >
        > > Relay 2. Controls the HP pump (high pressure pump), this also is ganged to control the larger relay that controls the feed power to the pump. Sounds like it is working ok.
        > >
        > > Relay 3. Controls the bypass solenoid. When the solenoid is activated product water (fresh water produced) is diverted to the tanks. On my system the default mode is bypass (i.e. the product water goes overboard). The solenoid must be electrically actuated to divert the product water to the tank. So the question is: is the solenoid itself not working or is the control circuit that actuates the solenoid not working, or is the water being lost somewhere else?
        > >
        > > Kent: There's no evidence of water anywhere else. That amount of water should show up under the galley sink, the sump, or in the bilge in the salon. I just heard from Martin at Dessalator Spain. He said there's a bypass button on the 3-way valve that diverts water to the tank. He says that valve often fails from drying out and that I can over ride it by pushing the button and turning it a bit to keep it open. That would keep the valve open all the time, so I'd have to make sure water quality is good before over riding it. He says sometimes it will start working correctly after doing the over ride procedure.
        > >
        > > The solenoid is merely a 24 Volt DC solenoid (on my system). You can test it by applying 24 VDC to its two wires. On my system they are the orange colored wires that go to pins 10 and 11 of plug 1 on the circuit board. The fuse that protects Relay 3 must be good because it is the same fuse that protects relay 1 and 2.
        > >
        > > I found that my system takes anywhere from 2-5 minutes to produce good water (depending on how long it has been idle). The timer on my original circuit board sent product water to the tank long before good quality water was produced, so I wired a manual switch on the solenoid circuit. When my sensor shows EC (electrical conductivity) less than 550 microSeimens I throw the switch to divert product water to the tanks. If the alarm on the EC sensor goes off, indicating EC of over 550 mS, it sounds a 110 Decibel Sonalert and I run to the galley and throw the manual switch to off.
        > > Kent: I still haven't done anything about the "sham" water quality sensor. Was going to get started on that when these problems started. I've been relying on testing the water coming from the test faucet to make sure the water I'm putting in the tank is good. Once I get this straightened out I'll make the changes you suggest.
        > >
        > >
        > > If you supply 24 VDC to the solenoid you should here it click (sometimes hard to do with the genset and HP pump running).
        > >
        > > You can test the solenoid in peace an quite with the genset off by:
        > >
        > > 1. turning on the rotary control switch (this supplies 24 VDC to the control board)
        > > 2. using a multimeter check to see if you have 24 VDC on pin 10 of plug 1.
        > > 3. if you have 24 VDC on that pin, then using a piece of wire, provide a ground to pin 11 of plug 1 by shorting between pin 11 and the inboard base of fuse 3 (inboard referring to the circuit board so the end towards the center of the circuit board) . You should hear the solenoid click. The solenoid is on top of the flow gauge/tube. If you can confirm the solenoid actuating, then there may be a control relay (3) issue, a stuck solenoid or some other control issue. If that is the case you can make a work around by wiring a manual control switch like I have done. If the solenoid is stuck, gently tapping it may break it loose.
        > >
        > > The parts location picture is in the Photos section under Amel SM Dessalator and the schematics are in the Files section.
        > >
        > > I hope this helps. If I can be of any further assistance please post or you can give me a call at 801-543-5801.
        > >
        > > All the best,
        > >
        > > Gary
        > > Amel SM 335 s/v Liahona
        > > Un-insured (due to Lemma Insurance's bankruptcy) and on the hard in Jolly Harbor, Antigua
        > > Kent: Have you made contact with the multiple recommended insurers yet? I'd be pretty nervous about not being insured. Thanks again for all your help, Gary. Wish I could watch you at work...maybe it wouldn't seem so complicated. All your posts and photos are very helpful in identifying the parts and understanding how stuff works. I'm still a bit timid when it comes to getting my hands on electrical gear, but once I do it things seem fairly simple most of the time.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Kent Robertson <karkauai@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Hello again, everyone,
        > > > I finally got back to KRISTY last weekend. I sailed her out into clean water and turned the 60 l/hr Dessalator water maker on. Martin at the Spain office of Desallator said that the blinking light should just be due to low pressure. He suggested that I turn it on and let it run for a few minutes...sure enough, after a couple of minutes of turning the pressure knob on the panel all the way up to get it into the green zone, the blinking/clicking stopped and the "float" on the panel above the sink showed that it was producing water. The light turned green (I know, Gary, that doesn't mean it's producing good water. I checked the water at the test faucet on the panel, and it was OK.) So I let it run for 3 hours, then shut it off as we approached the dirty water. To my dismay, when I checked the tank level after returning to the dock, I hadn't added any water to the tank. I think it had to be producing water since the float level was showing 60
        > > > l/hr, so I guess it was just pumping it overboard. The green light was on the whole time. Does anyone know how I can test the valve that switches output to the tank? Any other ideas about what might be wrong and how to troubleshoot?
        > > > Thanks in advance, Gary. I figure you know more about the Dessalator units than anyone else on the forum.
        > > >
        > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        >
        >
        > Reply via web post Reply to sender Reply to group Start a New Topic Messages in this topic (10)
        > RECENT ACTIVITY: New Members 3 New Files 1


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Kent Robertson
        Thanks, Richard.  This unit has performed flawlessly for the 5 years I ve owned Kristy.  I hate to start over again, but if the fix is really expensive or
        Message 3 of 16 , Nov 1, 2012
          Thanks, Richard.  This unit has performed flawlessly for the 5 years I've owned Kristy.  I hate to start over again, but if the fix is really expensive or doesn't last I'll take your advice and replace the whole thing.
          Kent




          ________________________________
          From: Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
          To: "amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Thursday, November 1, 2012 9:55 PM
          Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: Dessalator D60 amber light blinking/No water going into tank


           
          Kent we converted to manual while in St Martin working with Necol they will get rid of the old poorly done package and convert if to great working manual one.

          Regards

          Richard Piller

          Cell 603 767 5330

          On Nov 1, 2012, at 20:38, "Kent" <karkauai@...> wrote:

          > Hi again, Gary, et al.
          > I'm on the boat again and found that the control panel is very different from what you have, Gary. Here's what I've done:
          >
          > I turned the unit on Manual and it came on without a blinking light. After 2 minutes the green "good water" light came on. I checked the product line going to the tank and no water was flowing. The water coming from the test faucet at the control panel tested good with my hand held TDS monitor. I pushed the over ride button on the side of the diverter solenoid and water flowed to the tank. When I turned the unit on Automatic, the amber light blinked continuously and no water flowed into the tank unless I pushed the over ride button on the solenoid. The green light didn't come on after several minutes. I found a new salinity sensor (came with the boat, imagine that) and replaced the old one which looked OK...no difference. I repeated this test several times and the same thing happened each time...no blinking amber light and green light on after 2 min. when on Manual...blinking amber light for several minutes and no green light when on Automatic.
          >
          > I looked at the computer control board and the two black ?relays? say 12v, but the solenoid says 24v. The power at the solenoid is 8-10v. Should I be getting 24v at the solenoid? Seems like it should be at least 12v?
          > My unit has no feed pump, it is fed by gravity. Where does the unit read "low pressure"? When on Automatic and I turn the pressure knob the pressure goes up as it should to 60 bar on the pressure meter and flow in the glass tube with float goes to 60 l/m as it should.
          >
          > Sorry for the long explanation of what is happening. Do you have any suggestions as to what might be wrong or what I should do next?
          >
          > Thanks again for your patience and help.
          > Kent Robertson
          > S/V Kristy 1999 Amel SuperMaramu
          >
          > --- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Kent Robertson <karkauai@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Hi, Gary,
          > > Thanks for your prompt reply. I won't be back to the boat for a couple more days, but this is what I remember. I'll try what you suggest and what Martin of Dessalator Spain says to do (see below).
          > > Kent
          > > SM 243
          > > KRISTY
          > >
          > > See my answers to your questions below underlined
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > ________________________________
          > > From: amelliahona <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
          > > To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
          > > Sent: Tuesday, October 30, 2012 10:42 AM
          > > Subject: [Amel] Re: Dessalator D60 amber light blinking
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Hi Kent:
          > >
          > > Bummer, to have made water for 3 hours only to have it go overboard! Or at least that sounds like where it went. My boat doesn't have a test facet on the control panel. So a question for you, Does water come out of the test faucet only when product water is being made as witnessed by the flow gauge/tube? I am trying to get a sense of how your system is plumbed. Is the diverter solenoid downstream of the test faucet or upstream of it?
          > >
          > > Kent: Water comes out whether the green light (good water) or amber light (bad water) is on, so I guess the diverter is after the test faucet. The valve in the faucet leaks, so I had to cap it off. I'm going to have to buy a new one from Dessalator since I've been unable to find one that fits the threads elsewhere. In the meantime I can check water quality by taking the cap off. It will be messy, but I think I can do it without getting water everywhere.
          > >
          > > If your control circuit board is similar to mine, there are three control relays:
          > >
          > > Relay 1. Controls the BP pump (low pressure feed pump) this is "ganged" to control a larger relay that actually controls the power to the pump. Sounds like it is working ok.
          > >
          > > Kent: I don't have a feed pump, it's gravity fed.
          > >
          > > Relay 2. Controls the HP pump (high pressure pump), this also is ganged to control the larger relay that controls the feed power to the pump. Sounds like it is working ok.
          > >
          > > Relay 3. Controls the bypass solenoid. When the solenoid is activated product water (fresh water produced) is diverted to the tanks. On my system the default mode is bypass (i.e. the product water goes overboard). The solenoid must be electrically actuated to divert the product water to the tank. So the question is: is the solenoid itself not working or is the control circuit that actuates the solenoid not working, or is the water being lost somewhere else?
          > >
          > > Kent: There's no evidence of water anywhere else. That amount of water should show up under the galley sink, the sump, or in the bilge in the salon. I just heard from Martin at Dessalator Spain. He said there's a bypass button on the 3-way valve that diverts water to the tank. He says that valve often fails from drying out and that I can over ride it by pushing the button and turning it a bit to keep it open. That would keep the valve open all the time, so I'd have to make sure water quality is good before over riding it. He says sometimes it will start working correctly after doing the over ride procedure.
          > >
          > > The solenoid is merely a 24 Volt DC solenoid (on my system). You can test it by applying 24 VDC to its two wires. On my system they are the orange colored wires that go to pins 10 and 11 of plug 1 on the circuit board. The fuse that protects Relay 3 must be good because it is the same fuse that protects relay 1 and 2.
          > >
          > > I found that my system takes anywhere from 2-5 minutes to produce good water (depending on how long it has been idle). The timer on my original circuit board sent product water to the tank long before good quality water was produced, so I wired a manual switch on the solenoid circuit. When my sensor shows EC (electrical conductivity) less than 550 microSeimens I throw the switch to divert product water to the tanks. If the alarm on the EC sensor goes off, indicating EC of over 550 mS, it sounds a 110 Decibel Sonalert and I run to the galley and throw the manual switch to off.
          > > Kent: I still haven't done anything about the "sham" water quality sensor. Was going to get started on that when these problems started. I've been relying on testing the water coming from the test faucet to make sure the water I'm putting in the tank is good. Once I get this straightened out I'll make the changes you suggest.
          > >
          > >
          > > If you supply 24 VDC to the solenoid you should here it click (sometimes hard to do with the genset and HP pump running).
          > >
          > > You can test the solenoid in peace an quite with the genset off by:
          > >
          > > 1. turning on the rotary control switch (this supplies 24 VDC to the control board)
          > > 2. using a multimeter check to see if you have 24 VDC on pin 10 of plug 1.
          > > 3. if you have 24 VDC on that pin, then using a piece of wire, provide a ground to pin 11 of plug 1 by shorting between pin 11 and the inboard base of fuse 3 (inboard referring to the circuit board so the end towards the center of the circuit board) . You should hear the solenoid click. The solenoid is on top of the flow gauge/tube. If you can confirm the solenoid actuating, then there may be a control relay (3) issue, a stuck solenoid or some other control issue. If that is the case you can make a work around by wiring a manual control switch like I have done. If the solenoid is stuck, gently tapping it may break it loose.
          > >
          > > The parts location picture is in the Photos section under Amel SM Dessalator and the schematics are in the Files section.
          > >
          > > I hope this helps. If I can be of any further assistance please post or you can give me a call at 801-543-5801.
          > >
          > > All the best,
          > >
          > > Gary
          > > Amel SM 335 s/v Liahona
          > > Un-insured (due to Lemma Insurance's bankruptcy) and on the hard in Jolly Harbor, Antigua
          > > Kent: Have you made contact with the multiple recommended insurers yet? I'd be pretty nervous about not being insured. Thanks again for all your help, Gary. Wish I could watch you at work...maybe it wouldn't seem so complicated. All your posts and photos are very helpful in identifying the parts and understanding how stuff works. I'm still a bit timid when it comes to getting my hands on electrical gear, but once I do it things seem fairly simple most of the time.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > --- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Kent Robertson <karkauai@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Hello again, everyone,
          > > > I finally got back to KRISTY last weekend. I sailed her out into clean water and turned the 60 l/hr Dessalator water maker on. Martin at the Spain office of Desallator said that the blinking light should just be due to low pressure. He suggested that I turn it on and let it run for a few minutes...sure enough, after a couple of minutes of turning the pressure knob on the panel all the way up to get it into the green zone, the blinking/clicking stopped and the "float" on the panel above the sink showed that it was producing water. The light turned green (I know, Gary, that doesn't mean it's producing good water. I checked the water at the test faucet on the panel, and it was OK.) So I let it run for 3 hours, then shut it off as we approached the dirty water. To my dismay, when I checked the tank level after returning to the dock, I hadn't added any water to the tank. I think it had to be producing water since the float level was showing 60
          > > > l/hr, so I guess it was just pumping it overboard. The green light was on the whole time. Does anyone know how I can test the valve that switches output to the tank? Any other ideas about what might be wrong and how to troubleshoot?
          > > > Thanks in advance, Gary. I figure you know more about the Dessalator units than anyone else on the forum.
          > > >
          > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          >
          >
          > Reply via web post Reply to sender Reply to group Start a New Topic Messages in this topic (10)
          > RECENT ACTIVITY: New Members 3 New Files 1

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Richard03801
          We have use the basic parts for the last six years without a problem. It works and we are always sure of what and how much is going in the tank. That is all go
          Message 4 of 16 , Nov 1, 2012
            We have use the basic parts for the last six years without a problem. It works and we are always sure of what and how much is going in the tank. That is all go clean water.

            Regards

            Richard Piller

            Cell 603 767 5330

            On Nov 1, 2012, at 22:20, Kent Robertson <karkauai@...> wrote:

            > Thanks, Richard. This unit has performed flawlessly for the 5 years I've owned Kristy. I hate to start over again, but if the fix is really expensive or doesn't last I'll take your advice and replace the whole thing.
            > Kent
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
            > To: "amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
            > Sent: Thursday, November 1, 2012 9:55 PM
            > Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: Dessalator D60 amber light blinking/No water going into tank
            >
            >
            >
            > Kent we converted to manual while in St Martin working with Necol they will get rid of the old poorly done package and convert if to great working manual one.
            >
            > Regards
            >
            > Richard Piller
            >
            > Cell 603 767 5330
            >
            > On Nov 1, 2012, at 20:38, "Kent" <karkauai@...> wrote:
            >
            > > Hi again, Gary, et al.
            > > I'm on the boat again and found that the control panel is very different from what you have, Gary. Here's what I've done:
            > >
            > > I turned the unit on Manual and it came on without a blinking light. After 2 minutes the green "good water" light came on. I checked the product line going to the tank and no water was flowing. The water coming from the test faucet at the control panel tested good with my hand held TDS monitor. I pushed the over ride button on the side of the diverter solenoid and water flowed to the tank. When I turned the unit on Automatic, the amber light blinked continuously and no water flowed into the tank unless I pushed the over ride button on the solenoid. The green light didn't come on after several minutes. I found a new salinity sensor (came with the boat, imagine that) and replaced the old one which looked OK...no difference. I repeated this test several times and the same thing happened each time...no blinking amber light and green light on after 2 min. when on Manual...blinking amber light for several minutes and no green light when on Automatic.
            > >
            > > I looked at the computer control board and the two black ?relays? say 12v, but the solenoid says 24v. The power at the solenoid is 8-10v. Should I be getting 24v at the solenoid? Seems like it should be at least 12v?
            > > My unit has no feed pump, it is fed by gravity. Where does the unit read "low pressure"? When on Automatic and I turn the pressure knob the pressure goes up as it should to 60 bar on the pressure meter and flow in the glass tube with float goes to 60 l/m as it should.
            > >
            > > Sorry for the long explanation of what is happening. Do you have any suggestions as to what might be wrong or what I should do next?
            > >
            > > Thanks again for your patience and help.
            > > Kent Robertson
            > > S/V Kristy 1999 Amel SuperMaramu
            > >
            > > --- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Kent Robertson <karkauai@...> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Hi, Gary,
            > > > Thanks for your prompt reply. I won't be back to the boat for a couple more days, but this is what I remember. I'll try what you suggest and what Martin of Dessalator Spain says to do (see below).
            > > > Kent
            > > > SM 243
            > > > KRISTY
            > > >
            > > > See my answers to your questions below underlined
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > ________________________________
            > > > From: amelliahona <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
            > > > To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
            > > > Sent: Tuesday, October 30, 2012 10:42 AM
            > > > Subject: [Amel] Re: Dessalator D60 amber light blinking
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Hi Kent:
            > > >
            > > > Bummer, to have made water for 3 hours only to have it go overboard! Or at least that sounds like where it went. My boat doesn't have a test facet on the control panel. So a question for you, Does water come out of the test faucet only when product water is being made as witnessed by the flow gauge/tube? I am trying to get a sense of how your system is plumbed. Is the diverter solenoid downstream of the test faucet or upstream of it?
            > > >
            > > > Kent: Water comes out whether the green light (good water) or amber light (bad water) is on, so I guess the diverter is after the test faucet. The valve in the faucet leaks, so I had to cap it off. I'm going to have to buy a new one from Dessalator since I've been unable to find one that fits the threads elsewhere. In the meantime I can check water quality by taking the cap off. It will be messy, but I think I can do it without getting water everywhere.
            > > >
            > > > If your control circuit board is similar to mine, there are three control relays:
            > > >
            > > > Relay 1. Controls the BP pump (low pressure feed pump) this is "ganged" to control a larger relay that actually controls the power to the pump. Sounds like it is working ok.
            > > >
            > > > Kent: I don't have a feed pump, it's gravity fed.
            > > >
            > > > Relay 2. Controls the HP pump (high pressure pump), this also is ganged to control the larger relay that controls the feed power to the pump. Sounds like it is working ok.
            > > >
            > > > Relay 3. Controls the bypass solenoid. When the solenoid is activated product water (fresh water produced) is diverted to the tanks. On my system the default mode is bypass (i.e. the product water goes overboard). The solenoid must be electrically actuated to divert the product water to the tank. So the question is: is the solenoid itself not working or is the control circuit that actuates the solenoid not working, or is the water being lost somewhere else?
            > > >
            > > > Kent: There's no evidence of water anywhere else. That amount of water should show up under the galley sink, the sump, or in the bilge in the salon. I just heard from Martin at Dessalator Spain. He said there's a bypass button on the 3-way valve that diverts water to the tank. He says that valve often fails from drying out and that I can over ride it by pushing the button and turning it a bit to keep it open. That would keep the valve open all the time, so I'd have to make sure water quality is good before over riding it. He says sometimes it will start working correctly after doing the over ride procedure.
            > > >
            > > > The solenoid is merely a 24 Volt DC solenoid (on my system). You can test it by applying 24 VDC to its two wires. On my system they are the orange colored wires that go to pins 10 and 11 of plug 1 on the circuit board. The fuse that protects Relay 3 must be good because it is the same fuse that protects relay 1 and 2.
            > > >
            > > > I found that my system takes anywhere from 2-5 minutes to produce good water (depending on how long it has been idle). The timer on my original circuit board sent product water to the tank long before good quality water was produced, so I wired a manual switch on the solenoid circuit. When my sensor shows EC (electrical conductivity) less than 550 microSeimens I throw the switch to divert product water to the tanks. If the alarm on the EC sensor goes off, indicating EC of over 550 mS, it sounds a 110 Decibel Sonalert and I run to the galley and throw the manual switch to off.
            > > > Kent: I still haven't done anything about the "sham" water quality sensor. Was going to get started on that when these problems started. I've been relying on testing the water coming from the test faucet to make sure the water I'm putting in the tank is good. Once I get this straightened out I'll make the changes you suggest.
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > If you supply 24 VDC to the solenoid you should here it click (sometimes hard to do with the genset and HP pump running).
            > > >
            > > > You can test the solenoid in peace an quite with the genset off by:
            > > >
            > > > 1. turning on the rotary control switch (this supplies 24 VDC to the control board)
            > > > 2. using a multimeter check to see if you have 24 VDC on pin 10 of plug 1.
            > > > 3. if you have 24 VDC on that pin, then using a piece of wire, provide a ground to pin 11 of plug 1 by shorting between pin 11 and the inboard base of fuse 3 (inboard referring to the circuit board so the end towards the center of the circuit board) . You should hear the solenoid click. The solenoid is on top of the flow gauge/tube. If you can confirm the solenoid actuating, then there may be a control relay (3) issue, a stuck solenoid or some other control issue. If that is the case you can make a work around by wiring a manual control switch like I have done. If the solenoid is stuck, gently tapping it may break it loose.
            > > >
            > > > The parts location picture is in the Photos section under Amel SM Dessalator and the schematics are in the Files section.
            > > >
            > > > I hope this helps. If I can be of any further assistance please post or you can give me a call at 801-543-5801.
            > > >
            > > > All the best,
            > > >
            > > > Gary
            > > > Amel SM 335 s/v Liahona
            > > > Un-insured (due to Lemma Insurance's bankruptcy) and on the hard in Jolly Harbor, Antigua
            > > > Kent: Have you made contact with the multiple recommended insurers yet? I'd be pretty nervous about not being insured. Thanks again for all your help, Gary. Wish I could watch you at work...maybe it wouldn't seem so complicated. All your posts and photos are very helpful in identifying the parts and understanding how stuff works. I'm still a bit timid when it comes to getting my hands on electrical gear, but once I do it things seem fairly simple most of the time.
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > --- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Kent Robertson <karkauai@> wrote:
            > > > >
            > > > > Hello again, everyone,
            > > > > I finally got back to KRISTY last weekend. I sailed her out into clean water and turned the 60 l/hr Dessalator water maker on. Martin at the Spain office of Desallator said that the blinking light should just be due to low pressure. He suggested that I turn it on and let it run for a few minutes...sure enough, after a couple of minutes of turning the pressure knob on the panel all the way up to get it into the green zone, the blinking/clicking stopped and the "float" on the panel above the sink showed that it was producing water. The light turned green (I know, Gary, that doesn't mean it's producing good water. I checked the water at the test faucet on the panel, and it was OK.) So I let it run for 3 hours, then shut it off as we approached the dirty water. To my dismay, when I checked the tank level after returning to the dock, I hadn't added any water to the tank. I think it had to be producing water since the float level was showing 60
            > > > > l/hr, so I guess it was just pumping it overboard. The green light was on the whole time. Does anyone know how I can test the valve that switches output to the tank? Any other ideas about what might be wrong and how to troubleshoot?
            > > > > Thanks in advance, Gary. I figure you know more about the Dessalator units than anyone else on the forum.
            > > > >
            > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Reply via web post Reply to sender Reply to group Start a New Topic Messages in this topic (10)
            > > RECENT ACTIVITY: New Members 3 New Files 1
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • amelliahona
            Hi Kent: It sounds like our two systems are quite different. My system doesn t even have a manual position on the main on/off switch. From your description,
            Message 5 of 16 , Nov 4, 2012
              Hi Kent:

              It sounds like our two systems are quite different. My system doesn't even have a manual position on the main on/off switch. From your description, the product water from the membranes routes to the flow meter tube, then to the test faucet and then to the solenoid diverter valve.

              It sounds to me like the salinity sensor on your system doesn't work any more properly than it does on all the rest of the Dessalator systems, prior to their making the latest control board. The newest board, by all reports works correctly and actually measures salinity.

              As for the relays, mine are 12 volt DC control coils: Scharack TN313012 - Rated: 7 Amp at 30 VDC. I suspect that yours are the same. It is common for relays to have a control coil rated for 12 volts, but for the voltage of the contacts (i.e. the voltage they are controlling) to be controlling 24 volts or more. The key question for manually controlling this system is what is the voltage rating of the solenoid valve. I believe that as you indicated it is a 24 volt solenoid.

              When you measure the voltage that the solenoid is seeing, put one test lead on the supply voltage side of the solenoid and one lead on a known good ground. Don't just measure across the two leads, otherwise you are seeing the voltage drop across the solenoid coil.

              Next, If the solenoid is depicted/labeled as 24 VDC then I would try applying 24 volts to its two wires and see if it will actuate. To do this,
              1. totally disconnect the two solenoid wires from the control board,
              2. find a spot where you can get 24 VDC
              3. using jumper wires, wire 24 volts to one lead of the solenoid and wire the other lead to a known good ships ground (this is not polarity specific so don't worry about + & - here)
              4. activate your water maker and test the solenoid independently by alternately applying 24 volts to the solenoid and opening that circuit to see if your solenoid actuates and diverts product water or not. If it doesn't work properly doing this then the solenoid is either electrically defective or mechanically defective and if tapping on it etc doesn't work then it probably will need to be replaced. Dessalator should be able to provide a replacement solenoid or you can search the web for one and probably find a direct or suitable substitute replacement for a lot cheaper.

              I don't know if the button on the solenoid is electrically or mechanically actuating the solenoid. You might be able to tell by the feel of the button and the sound of the solenoid as you push that button.

              I think what Richard was indicating, was just wiring manual switches (about $2.00 US each) in the control circuit so that you manually actuate this solenoid, HP pump etc. I don't think he was implying completely replacing the water maker. The component parts of the Dessalator system are sound, it is just their control circuit board that was bogus. You might contact Dessalator and see if their new control board would work with your system.

              In actuality, all the control board does is act like three switches [in your case or four in my case where one of the switches controls power to the BP low pressure pump].

              On yours,
              It turns on power to the control board (switch 1)
              It controls power to the HP pump (switch 2) via a ganged relay
              It controls power to the solenoid of the diverter valve (switch 3)

              You can totally bypass the control board with just two manual $ 2.00 switches, one each to control power 24 volts to the ganged relay for the HP pump, and one to control 24 volt power to the solenoid diverter valve. The LED lamps won't display correctly if you do this but they don't display correctly now. It shouldn't take a competent electrician with the schematics I have provided here more than about two to three hours to totally wire the system for manual operation including wiring in a proper salinity sensor with a Sonalert to warn of a bad water situation or a high pressure situation.

              All the fundamental parts of your system sound like they are working and you just need either a new control board or better yet a re-vamped manual system. I can provide a schematic for a re-vamped manual system if that is the direction you decide to go.

              I hope I have helped.

              Gary

              s/v Liahona




              --- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Kent" <karkauai@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi again, Gary, et al.
              > I'm on the boat again and found that the control panel is very different from what you have, Gary. Here's what I've done:
              >
              > I turned the unit on Manual and it came on without a blinking light. After 2 minutes the green "good water" light came on. I checked the product line going to the tank and no water was flowing. The water coming from the test faucet at the control panel tested good with my hand held TDS monitor. I pushed the over ride button on the side of the diverter solenoid and water flowed to the tank. When I turned the unit on Automatic, the amber light blinked continuously and no water flowed into the tank unless I pushed the over ride button on the solenoid. The green light didn't come on after several minutes. I found a new salinity sensor (came with the boat, imagine that) and replaced the old one which looked OK...no difference. I repeated this test several times and the same thing happened each time...no blinking amber light and green light on after 2 min. when on Manual...blinking amber light for several minutes and no green light when on Automatic.
              >
              > I looked at the computer control board and the two black ?relays? say 12v, but the solenoid says 24v. The power at the solenoid is 8-10v. Should I be getting 24v at the solenoid? Seems like it should be at least 12v?
              > My unit has no feed pump, it is fed by gravity. Where does the unit read "low pressure"? When on Automatic and I turn the pressure knob the pressure goes up as it should to 60 bar on the pressure meter and flow in the glass tube with float goes to 60 l/m as it should.
              >
              > Sorry for the long explanation of what is happening. Do you have any suggestions as to what might be wrong or what I should do next?
              >
              > Thanks again for your patience and help.
              > Kent Robertson
              > S/V Kristy 1999 Amel SuperMaramu
            • Richard03801
              Kent you have the same unit We do. Basically you by pass the electronic package install a two way valve over board and tank Turn on the system as you do now
              Message 6 of 16 , Nov 4, 2012
                Kent you have the same unit We do. Basically you by pass the electronic package install a two way valve over board and tank Turn on the system as you do now with a manual switch turn up the pressure test the water after 2 or 3 min when it is less than 400p pm turn the valve to tank. And you are making water.
                When we did the conversion we also replaced the two membrane filters mounts on the bulk head with one, one meter mounted on the shelf.

                Regards

                Richard Piller

                Cell 603 767 5330

                On Nov 4, 2012, at 10:19, amelliahona <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                >
                >
                > Hi Kent:
                >
                > It sounds like our two systems are quite different. My system doesn't even have a manual position on the main on/off switch. From your description, the product water from the membranes routes to the flow meter tube, then to the test faucet and then to the solenoid diverter valve.
                >
                > It sounds to me like the salinity sensor on your system doesn't work any more properly than it does on all the rest of the Dessalator systems, prior to their making the latest control board. The newest board, by all reports works correctly and actually measures salinity.
                >
                > As for the relays, mine are 12 volt DC control coils: Scharack TN313012 - Rated: 7 Amp at 30 VDC. I suspect that yours are the same. It is common for relays to have a control coil rated for 12 volts, but for the voltage of the contacts (i.e. the voltage they are controlling) to be controlling 24 volts or more. The key question for manually controlling this system is what is the voltage rating of the solenoid valve. I believe that as you indicated it is a 24 volt solenoid.
                >
                > When you measure the voltage that the solenoid is seeing, put one test lead on the supply voltage side of the solenoid and one lead on a known good ground. Don't just measure across the two leads, otherwise you are seeing the voltage drop across the solenoid coil.
                >
                > Next, If the solenoid is depicted/labeled as 24 VDC then I would try applying 24 volts to its two wires and see if it will actuate. To do this,
                > 1. totally disconnect the two solenoid wires from the control board,
                > 2. find a spot where you can get 24 VDC
                > 3. using jumper wires, wire 24 volts to one lead of the solenoid and wire the other lead to a known good ships ground (this is not polarity specific so don't worry about + & - here)
                > 4. activate your water maker and test the solenoid independently by alternately applying 24 volts to the solenoid and opening that circuit to see if your solenoid actuates and diverts product water or not. If it doesn't work properly doing this then the solenoid is either electrically defective or mechanically defective and if tapping on it etc doesn't work then it probably will need to be replaced. Dessalator should be able to provide a replacement solenoid or you can search the web for one and probably find a direct or suitable substitute replacement for a lot cheaper.
                >
                > I don't know if the button on the solenoid is electrically or mechanically actuating the solenoid. You might be able to tell by the feel of the button and the sound of the solenoid as you push that button.
                >
                > I think what Richard was indicating, was just wiring manual switches (about $2.00 US each) in the control circuit so that you manually actuate this solenoid, HP pump etc. I don't think he was implying completely replacing the water maker. The component parts of the Dessalator system are sound, it is just their control circuit board that was bogus. You might contact Dessalator and see if their new control board would work with your system.
                >
                > In actuality, all the control board does is act like three switches [in your case or four in my case where one of the switches controls power to the BP low pressure pump].
                >
                > On yours,
                > It turns on power to the control board (switch 1)
                > It controls power to the HP pump (switch 2) via a ganged relay
                > It controls power to the solenoid of the diverter valve (switch 3)
                >
                > You can totally bypass the control board with just two manual $ 2.00 switches, one each to control power 24 volts to the ganged relay for the HP pump, and one to control 24 volt power to the solenoid diverter valve. The LED lamps won't display correctly if you do this but they don't display correctly now. It shouldn't take a competent electrician with the schematics I have provided here more than about two to three hours to totally wire the system for manual operation including wiring in a proper salinity sensor with a Sonalert to warn of a bad water situation or a high pressure situation.
                >
                > All the fundamental parts of your system sound like they are working and you just need either a new control board or better yet a re-vamped manual system. I can provide a schematic for a re-vamped manual system if that is the direction you decide to go.
                >
                > I hope I have helped.
                >
                > Gary
                >
                > s/v Liahona
                >
                > --- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Kent" <karkauai@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > Hi again, Gary, et al.
                > > I'm on the boat again and found that the control panel is very different from what you have, Gary. Here's what I've done:
                > >
                > > I turned the unit on Manual and it came on without a blinking light. After 2 minutes the green "good water" light came on. I checked the product line going to the tank and no water was flowing. The water coming from the test faucet at the control panel tested good with my hand held TDS monitor. I pushed the over ride button on the side of the diverter solenoid and water flowed to the tank. When I turned the unit on Automatic, the amber light blinked continuously and no water flowed into the tank unless I pushed the over ride button on the solenoid. The green light didn't come on after several minutes. I found a new salinity sensor (came with the boat, imagine that) and replaced the old one which looked OK...no difference. I repeated this test several times and the same thing happened each time...no blinking amber light and green light on after 2 min. when on Manual...blinking amber light for several minutes and no green light when on Automatic.
                > >
                > > I looked at the computer control board and the two black ?relays? say 12v, but the solenoid says 24v. The power at the solenoid is 8-10v. Should I be getting 24v at the solenoid? Seems like it should be at least 12v?
                > > My unit has no feed pump, it is fed by gravity. Where does the unit read "low pressure"? When on Automatic and I turn the pressure knob the pressure goes up as it should to 60 bar on the pressure meter and flow in the glass tube with float goes to 60 l/m as it should.
                > >
                > > Sorry for the long explanation of what is happening. Do you have any suggestions as to what might be wrong or what I should do next?
                > >
                > > Thanks again for your patience and help.
                > > Kent Robertson
                > > S/V Kristy 1999 Amel SuperMaramu
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • karkauai@yahoo.com
                I have a clear picture now of how to proceed, Gary. I ll let you all know what I find when I get back to the boat in a few weeks. Thanks again for your
                Message 7 of 16 , Nov 4, 2012
                  I have a clear picture now of how to proceed, Gary. I'll let you all know what I find when I get back to the boat in a few weeks.
                  Thanks again for your excellent description in terms I can understand.
                  Kent
                  1999 SM243
                  Kristy
                  Brunswick, GA


                  Sent from my BlackBerry� smartphone powered by Alltel

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: amelliahona <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sender: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Sun, 04 Nov 2012 15:19:04
                  To: <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
                  Reply-To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [Amel] Re: Dessalator D60 amber light blinking/No water going into tank




                  Hi Kent:

                  It sounds like our two systems are quite different. My system doesn't even have a manual position on the main on/off switch. From your description, the product water from the membranes routes to the flow meter tube, then to the test faucet and then to the solenoid diverter valve.

                  It sounds to me like the salinity sensor on your system doesn't work any more properly than it does on all the rest of the Dessalator systems, prior to their making the latest control board. The newest board, by all reports works correctly and actually measures salinity.

                  As for the relays, mine are 12 volt DC control coils: Scharack TN313012 - Rated: 7 Amp at 30 VDC. I suspect that yours are the same. It is common for relays to have a control coil rated for 12 volts, but for the voltage of the contacts (i.e. the voltage they are controlling) to be controlling 24 volts or more. The key question for manually controlling this system is what is the voltage rating of the solenoid valve. I believe that as you indicated it is a 24 volt solenoid.

                  When you measure the voltage that the solenoid is seeing, put one test lead on the supply voltage side of the solenoid and one lead on a known good ground. Don't just measure across the two leads, otherwise you are seeing the voltage drop across the solenoid coil.

                  Next, If the solenoid is depicted/labeled as 24 VDC then I would try applying 24 volts to its two wires and see if it will actuate. To do this,
                  1. totally disconnect the two solenoid wires from the control board,
                  2. find a spot where you can get 24 VDC
                  3. using jumper wires, wire 24 volts to one lead of the solenoid and wire the other lead to a known good ships ground (this is not polarity specific so don't worry about + & - here)
                  4. activate your water maker and test the solenoid independently by alternately applying 24 volts to the solenoid and opening that circuit to see if your solenoid actuates and diverts product water or not. If it doesn't work properly doing this then the solenoid is either electrically defective or mechanically defective and if tapping on it etc doesn't work then it probably will need to be replaced. Dessalator should be able to provide a replacement solenoid or you can search the web for one and probably find a direct or suitable substitute replacement for a lot cheaper.

                  I don't know if the button on the solenoid is electrically or mechanically actuating the solenoid. You might be able to tell by the feel of the button and the sound of the solenoid as you push that button.

                  I think what Richard was indicating, was just wiring manual switches (about $2.00 US each) in the control circuit so that you manually actuate this solenoid, HP pump etc. I don't think he was implying completely replacing the water maker. The component parts of the Dessalator system are sound, it is just their control circuit board that was bogus. You might contact Dessalator and see if their new control board would work with your system.

                  In actuality, all the control board does is act like three switches [in your case or four in my case where one of the switches controls power to the BP low pressure pump].

                  On yours,
                  It turns on power to the control board (switch 1)
                  It controls power to the HP pump (switch 2) via a ganged relay
                  It controls power to the solenoid of the diverter valve (switch 3)

                  You can totally bypass the control board with just two manual $ 2.00 switches, one each to control power 24 volts to the ganged relay for the HP pump, and one to control 24 volt power to the solenoid diverter valve. The LED lamps won't display correctly if you do this but they don't display correctly now. It shouldn't take a competent electrician with the schematics I have provided here more than about two to three hours to totally wire the system for manual operation including wiring in a proper salinity sensor with a Sonalert to warn of a bad water situation or a high pressure situation.

                  All the fundamental parts of your system sound like they are working and you just need either a new control board or better yet a re-vamped manual system. I can provide a schematic for a re-vamped manual system if that is the direction you decide to go.

                  I hope I have helped.

                  Gary

                  s/v Liahona




                  --- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Kent" <karkauai@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi again, Gary, et al.
                  > I'm on the boat again and found that the control panel is very different from what you have, Gary. Here's what I've done:
                  >
                  > I turned the unit on Manual and it came on without a blinking light. After 2 minutes the green "good water" light came on. I checked the product line going to the tank and no water was flowing. The water coming from the test faucet at the control panel tested good with my hand held TDS monitor. I pushed the over ride button on the side of the diverter solenoid and water flowed to the tank. When I turned the unit on Automatic, the amber light blinked continuously and no water flowed into the tank unless I pushed the over ride button on the solenoid. The green light didn't come on after several minutes. I found a new salinity sensor (came with the boat, imagine that) and replaced the old one which looked OK...no difference. I repeated this test several times and the same thing happened each time...no blinking amber light and green light on after 2 min. when on Manual...blinking amber light for several minutes and no green light when on Automatic.
                  >
                  > I looked at the computer control board and the two black ?relays? say 12v, but the solenoid says 24v. The power at the solenoid is 8-10v. Should I be getting 24v at the solenoid? Seems like it should be at least 12v?
                  > My unit has no feed pump, it is fed by gravity. Where does the unit read "low pressure"? When on Automatic and I turn the pressure knob the pressure goes up as it should to 60 bar on the pressure meter and flow in the glass tube with float goes to 60 l/m as it should.
                  >
                  > Sorry for the long explanation of what is happening. Do you have any suggestions as to what might be wrong or what I should do next?
                  >
                  > Thanks again for your patience and help.
                  > Kent Robertson
                  > S/V Kristy 1999 Amel SuperMaramu




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