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RE: [Amarillo Astronomy Club] Brief, but Great Viewing Session

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  • Terrill Bartlett
    That was a good report Robert. I wanted to go out but laziness set in. As soon as the moon goes into hiding again I will resume the Herschel’s. I have 62
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 2, 2007
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      That was a good report Robert. I wanted to go out but laziness set in. As
      soon as the moon goes into hiding again I will resume the Herschel’s. I have
      62 left.



      Terrill

      _____

      From: amarilloastronomyclub@yahoogroups.com
      [mailto:amarilloastronomyclub@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Robert Ashcraft
      Sent: Monday, July 02, 2007 10:28 AM
      To: amarilloastronomyclub@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Amarillo Astronomy Club] Brief, but Great Viewing Session



      Monday, July 2, 2007

      The sky was fairly clear last night around 8:15, so I set up the
      Obsession 12.5 on the driveway to let the mirror warm up. The scope
      had been in the house in a 74 degree environment, but it was 86
      degrees outside.

      My prime interest was getting to see Venus and Saturn only ¾ of a
      degree apart. Sunset was at 9:05, but I spotted Venus at 8:40 and
      quickly had both planets in the same field of view with the 26 mm
      Nagler. Saturn normally has a yellowish tint, but it appeared
      somewhat orange before sunset. Venus was a brilliant white. After
      enjoying the view with the 26 for awhile, I switched to the 13 mm
      Nagler to look at the planets individually. Seeing conditions were
      great – Saturn's cloud bands and Cassini division were razor sharp.
      Venus looked like a crescent Moon, except for the cusps. Due to
      Venus' atmosphere, the cusps extended away from the terminator,
      appearing to be very sharp compared to the Moon's cusps.

      Saturn and Venus kept me occupied until 9:15. Then I switched to
      Jupiter, which was very prominent in the southeast and about 24
      degrees above the horizon. With the 7 mm Nagler (228X), Jupiter's
      cloudbands were about as sharp as I've ever seen them. With the 5 mm
      Nagler (319X), the image was a little bit softer, however.

      At 9:30 I switched to Antares, which had an elevation of about 21
      degrees. Antares was nicely split with the 5 mm, so I tried lower
      powers. It was still well resolved with the 7 mm, a little more
      difficult with the 9 mm, and was very difficult with the 13 mm (123X).

      At 9:40 I looked at Epsilon Bootis. This double usually takes about
      175X to split, but I was able to split it at 123X.

      Next up was M57. The view was nice, but since twilight hadn't ended,
      it was rather dim.

      Even though the stars in Hercules were hard to see, I found M13, and
      even though it wasn't really dark, the view was great. At 123X, M13
      appeared as a sprinkling of gold dust.

      By now it was 9:50 and the weather was changing. Warm air, clouds
      and moisture were pouring in from the southeast. I took one last
      quick look at Antares. There was so much turbulence it wouldn't even
      come to a focus, so I knew the session was over. But it was fun
      while it lasted.





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Bobby and Rosemary Schiffman
      Terril At the rate you are going, you will be qualified to certify my list of Herschels. ;) I have 280 left. Bobby ... From: Terrill Bartlett To:
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 2, 2007
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        Terril
        At the rate you are going, you will be qualified to certify my list of Herschels. ;)
        I have 280 left.

        Bobby

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Terrill Bartlett
        To: amarilloastronomyclub@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, July 02, 2007 11:25 AM
        Subject: RE: [Amarillo Astronomy Club] Brief, but Great Viewing Session


        That was a good report Robert. I wanted to go out but laziness set in. As
        soon as the moon goes into hiding again I will resume the Herschel's. I have
        62 left.

        Terrill

        _____

        From: amarilloastronomyclub@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:amarilloastronomyclub@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Robert Ashcraft
        Sent: Monday, July 02, 2007 10:28 AM
        To: amarilloastronomyclub@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Amarillo Astronomy Club] Brief, but Great Viewing Session

        Monday, July 2, 2007

        The sky was fairly clear last night around 8:15, so I set up the
        Obsession 12.5 on the driveway to let the mirror warm up. The scope
        had been in the house in a 74 degree environment, but it was 86
        degrees outside.

        My prime interest was getting to see Venus and Saturn only ¾ of a
        degree apart. Sunset was at 9:05, but I spotted Venus at 8:40 and
        quickly had both planets in the same field of view with the 26 mm
        Nagler. Saturn normally has a yellowish tint, but it appeared
        somewhat orange before sunset. Venus was a brilliant white. After
        enjoying the view with the 26 for awhile, I switched to the 13 mm
        Nagler to look at the planets individually. Seeing conditions were
        great - Saturn's cloud bands and Cassini division were razor sharp.
        Venus looked like a crescent Moon, except for the cusps. Due to
        Venus' atmosphere, the cusps extended away from the terminator,
        appearing to be very sharp compared to the Moon's cusps.

        Saturn and Venus kept me occupied until 9:15. Then I switched to
        Jupiter, which was very prominent in the southeast and about 24
        degrees above the horizon. With the 7 mm Nagler (228X), Jupiter's
        cloudbands were about as sharp as I've ever seen them. With the 5 mm
        Nagler (319X), the image was a little bit softer, however.

        At 9:30 I switched to Antares, which had an elevation of about 21
        degrees. Antares was nicely split with the 5 mm, so I tried lower
        powers. It was still well resolved with the 7 mm, a little more
        difficult with the 9 mm, and was very difficult with the 13 mm (123X).

        At 9:40 I looked at Epsilon Bootis. This double usually takes about
        175X to split, but I was able to split it at 123X.

        Next up was M57. The view was nice, but since twilight hadn't ended,
        it was rather dim.

        Even though the stars in Hercules were hard to see, I found M13, and
        even though it wasn't really dark, the view was great. At 123X, M13
        appeared as a sprinkling of gold dust.

        By now it was 9:50 and the weather was changing. Warm air, clouds
        and moisture were pouring in from the southeast. I took one last
        quick look at Antares. There was so much turbulence it wouldn't even
        come to a focus, so I knew the session was over. But it was fun
        while it lasted.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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