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Re: [am-photo] Tungsten balanced

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  • havoc
    tungsten balanced film was developed *specifically* for use under tungston lamps (normal, house, incondecent ligth bulbs) so that the color of the image would
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 1, 2001
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      tungsten balanced film was developed *specifically* for use under
      tungston lamps (normal, house, incondecent ligth bulbs) so that the
      color of the image would normal colors.

      tungsten filiments emit a red/orange light. our brains can correct for
      that, but film can't. If you were to use a flash with your tungsten
      balanced film, or use it in daylight, you're images would come out with
      a blue tent.

      jody

      Daniel Smith wrote:
      >
      > I was wondering, how does tungsten balanced film work, and does it work in
      > daylight or with a flash? Or can you only use it with incadescent lighting?
      > And does it work satisfactorially? Anything else I might want to know?
      >
      > Daniel
      >

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    • Dianne
      Daniel, Tungsten film is also very nice on night light photography, night store windows and evening cityscapes. Dianne
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 1, 2001
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        Daniel, Tungsten film is also very nice on night light photography,
        night store windows and evening cityscapes.

        Dianne
      • Salatrel
        Dan wrote:
        Message 3 of 8 , Jan 2, 2001
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          Dan wrote:
          <<I was wondering, how does tungsten balanced film work, and does it work in
          daylight or with a flash? Or can you only use it with incadescent lighting?
          And does it work satisfactorially? Anything else I might want to know?>>

          OK i have my book out for you..the best guess is can give you is that
          tungsten film is color balanced for indoor electric lights. indoor lighting
          has a brown yellow or orangey cast to it. When you use outdoor balanced film
          you get the yellow cast on your film..a golden appearance if you have
          noticed when you take pictures of people indoors with your flash?
          There is a filter to compensate for that without using tungsten film.
          And with flourescent lighting there is a green cast..that is because of the
          gases that the flourescent emits..neat huh? again a filter for that too. I
          like to use my cokin filter catalog for reference.

          But if you use tungsten film in day light you get a blue cast. That is why
          there are so many different films out there to exactly suit your
          photographic needs.
          Sometimes it says T in the title of the film..but if it does not say
          tungsten then it is day light balanced. The dyes in the film react to
          certain wave lengths or temperatures of light ..and that is the technical
          part of how it works..


          Salatrel








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        • Daniel Smith
          All right. Can you tell me what filters to use? For both tungsten and fluorescent? Thanks. I m thinking of doing some photography for my church, and I
          Message 4 of 8 , Jan 2, 2001
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            All right. Can you tell me what filters to use? For both tungsten and
            fluorescent? Thanks. I'm thinking of doing some photography for my church,
            and I don't want a flash to go off in the middle of the pastor's sermon.
            Thanks.


            Daniel


            > Dan wrote:
            > <<I was wondering, how does tungsten balanced film work, and does it work
            in
            > daylight or with a flash? Or can you only use it with incadescent
            lighting?
            > And does it work satisfactorially? Anything else I might want to know?>>
            >
            > OK i have my book out for you..the best guess is can give you is that
            > tungsten film is color balanced for indoor electric lights. indoor
            lighting
            > has a brown yellow or orangey cast to it. When you use outdoor balanced
            film
            > you get the yellow cast on your film..a golden appearance if you have
            > noticed when you take pictures of people indoors with your flash?
            > There is a filter to compensate for that without using tungsten film.
            > And with flourescent lighting there is a green cast..that is because of
            the
            > gases that the flourescent emits..neat huh? again a filter for that too. I
            > like to use my cokin filter catalog for reference.
            >
            > But if you use tungsten film in day light you get a blue cast. That is why
            > there are so many different films out there to exactly suit your
            > photographic needs.
            > Sometimes it says T in the title of the film..but if it does not say
            > tungsten then it is day light balanced. The dyes in the film react to
            > certain wave lengths or temperatures of light ..and that is the technical
            > part of how it works..
            >
            >
            > Salatrel
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
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          • Salatrel
            Dan wrote:
            Message 5 of 8 , Jan 10, 2001
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              Dan wrote:
              <<All right. Can you tell me what filters to use? For both tungsten and
              fluorescent? Thanks. I'm thinking of doing some photography for my church,
              and I don't want a flash to go off in the middle of the pastor's sermon.
              Thanks.>>

              oh my goodness has it been a week since i have read my mail..i am so sorry
              how did it go? What speed film did you use? What kind? If you used 800 or
              more you may not have needed a flash..but then again with the long
              lens..light loss..Illford makes a blk and wht 1600 that can also go up to
              3200.Delta pro film it is called. I want to try that for fun..yea lots of
              grain but that can be used as a neat effect too.

              I am going to have to get back to you on your filter quetion because my
              cokin pamphlet is at my father-in-laws house!
              But dianne can tell us this the best..but tungsten lighting is used in the
              studios right? and the outdoor film we use is balanced for a flash lighting
              too right?

              Salatrel
              reemerging from lurkdom....










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            • Daniel Smith
              Don t worry about it. I was actually talking about just something for myself, whenever I feel like it. And I d probably use 160 (I love that film. Anyone
              Message 6 of 8 , Jan 11, 2001
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                Don't worry about it. I was actually talking about just something for
                myself, whenever I feel like it. And I'd probably use 160 (I love that
                film. Anyone got info on the Kodak Portra 160VC and NC?). I've heard a lot
                about Ilford films, too. Is it a film you have to hand develop?

                Daniel


                > oh my goodness has it been a week since i have read my mail..i am so sorry
                > how did it go? What speed film did you use? What kind? If you used 800 or
                > more you may not have needed a flash..but then again with the long
                > lens..light loss..Illford makes a blk and wht 1600 that can also go up to
                > 3200.Delta pro film it is called. I want to try that for fun..yea lots of
                > grain but that can be used as a neat effect too.
                >
                > I am going to have to get back to you on your filter quetion because my
                > cokin pamphlet is at my father-in-laws house!
                > But dianne can tell us this the best..but tungsten lighting is used in the
                > studios right? and the outdoor film we use is balanced for a flash
                lighting
                > too right?
                >
                > Salatrel
                > reemerging from lurkdom....
              • Salatrel
                Dianne would probably know a lot about portrait films since she is a pro wedding photographer..but the perk to the kodak portra is that is is supposed to be
                Message 7 of 8 , Jan 13, 2001
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                  Dianne would probably know a lot about portrait films since she is a pro
                  wedding photographer..but the perk to the kodak portra is that is is
                  supposed to be balanced to match the other format you use. So the 35mm looks
                  like the medium format 120. This is critical when you need a wedding album
                  where the skin tone and dress colors all match .right? the portra is made
                  for outdoor and indoor flash too i think..the all purpose portrait film..the
                  speed is true as well. so you set the asa to 160 and you are getting the
                  best at that setting. At least this is my understanding from my readings..

                  some films actually work better than the speeds that the manufacture
                  recommends..but the pros know those secrets..so when you are demandingthe
                  highest quality image..you are going to demand more from your
                  films..thus..the pro film..which is what the portra is..and why you can't
                  find it at wal-mart..wink..

                  agfa is trying to get in on that too. with their 160 portrait film.
                  Illford..is a black and white film. Fuji has it own version too. I
                  think..Dianne, you use Fuji in your work, right?

                  I am telling you Dan..you have got to get this magazine: Outdoor
                  photographer..check your library for it. It is a wealth of information..the
                  ads alone I learn all of this from!

                  Salatrel





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