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Requesting Contracted .NET OSS Bug Fixes from the Community

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  • Bobby Johnson
    I am a OSS enthusiast and want to use tools like nHibernate in my daily application development practices. What I am not is a CIO or Architect at my company.
    Message 1 of 14 , Mar 27, 2009
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      I am a OSS enthusiast and want to use tools like nHibernate in my daily application development practices. What I am not is a CIO or Architect at my company. There are several roadblocks, misconceptions and valid concerns that are raise when I suggest using an OSS tool in one of our projects. One of the biggest concerns I have heard is that of responsibility. The question usually is phrased like this:


      "When we encounter a blocking bug what do we do?"


      The overwhelming OSS response to this is: "Fix it yourself and submit a patch." And this is where I lose management. Management doesn't want to take on the responsibilities of fixing platform bugs. In their eyes it is much easier to purchase packages from vendors who take on those responsibilities. The role of tools like nHibernate, Ninject or even Prism in my environment is to allow me to focus on business value and functionality. We are not a platform company.


      I want to find a solution to this problem, and I think it falls down to money. My company is willing to pay good money to a vendor for a tool that allows us to deliver business value quickly. I wonder if that same cash flow relationship could be applied to OSS.

      Say, I have to make a choice between vendor Product X and nHibernate for ORM. Product X requires a license fee of $1000 per developer. I chose nHibernate and put my $1000 per developer in the bank as a emergency fund.

      Six months later, I encounter a bug or blocking problem in nHibernate that is going to prevent me from releasing my product. I can't fix it myself. I do not have the time or the skill needed to do so. I create a test case for the problem and submit it with a portion of my emergency fund to the community for a solution.

      My question is, do you think anyone would accept it? What if we wanted them to be contractually obligated to fix the bug upon acceptance? Is anyone out there currently doing this? Would any of the current developers want to do this? Is this a viable alternative to vendor software here?

      So here is a list of the OSS tools I would like to use. Anyone out there willing to commit to saying, "Yes, if you can provide me with a test case, I can provide you with a fix for that OSS tool. I charge $X amount per hour or this flat fee."

      • nHibernate
      • Fluent nHibernate
      • Castle Winsor
      • Ninject
      • Rhino.Security
      • Prism
      • MVC Contrib
      • Caliburn

      If your particular pet OSS project is not listed, I would still like to hear from you. This list came of the top of my head from what I am currently interested in.



      --
      "The explanation requiring the fewest assumptions is most likely to be correct."

      - Occam’s Razor
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occam's_Razor
    • Tuna Toksoz
      You should submit those to each dev list, there will be better response to your question. Tuna Toksöz Eternal sunshine of the open source mind.
      Message 2 of 14 , Mar 27, 2009
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        You should submit those to each dev list, there will be better response to your question.


        Tuna Toksöz
        Eternal sunshine of the open source mind.

        http://devlicio.us/blogs/tuna_toksoz
        http://tunatoksoz.com
        http://twitter.com/tehlike




        On Fri, Mar 27, 2009 at 9:18 PM, Bobby Johnson <bobby.johnson+altnetgroup@...> wrote:

        I am a OSS enthusiast and want to use tools like nHibernate in my daily application development practices. What I am not is a CIO or Architect at my company. There are several roadblocks, misconceptions and valid concerns that are raise when I suggest using an OSS tool in one of our projects. One of the biggest concerns I have heard is that of responsibility. The question usually is phrased like this:


        "When we encounter a blocking bug what do we do?"


        The overwhelming OSS response to this is: "Fix it yourself and submit a patch." And this is where I lose management. Management doesn't want to take on the responsibilities of fixing platform bugs. In their eyes it is much easier to purchase packages from vendors who take on those responsibilities. The role of tools like nHibernate, Ninject or even Prism in my environment is to allow me to focus on business value and functionality. We are not a platform company.


        I want to find a solution to this problem, and I think it falls down to money. My company is willing to pay good money to a vendor for a tool that allows us to deliver business value quickly. I wonder if that same cash flow relationship could be applied to OSS.

        Say, I have to make a choice between vendor Product X and nHibernate for ORM. Product X requires a license fee of $1000 per developer. I chose nHibernate and put my $1000 per developer in the bank as a emergency fund.

        Six months later, I encounter a bug or blocking problem in nHibernate that is going to prevent me from releasing my product. I can't fix it myself. I do not have the time or the skill needed to do so. I create a test case for the problem and submit it with a portion of my emergency fund to the community for a solution.

        My question is, do you think anyone would accept it? What if we wanted them to be contractually obligated to fix the bug upon acceptance? Is anyone out there currently doing this? Would any of the current developers want to do this? Is this a viable alternative to vendor software here?

        So here is a list of the OSS tools I would like to use. Anyone out there willing to commit to saying, "Yes, if you can provide me with a test case, I can provide you with a fix for that OSS tool. I charge $X amount per hour or this flat fee."

        • nHibernate
        • Fluent nHibernate
        • Castle Winsor
        • Ninject
        • Rhino.Security
        • Prism
        • MVC Contrib
        • Caliburn

        If your particular pet OSS project is not listed, I would still like to hear from you. This list came of the top of my head from what I am currently interested in.



        --
        "The explanation requiring the fewest assumptions is most likely to be correct."

        - Occam’s Razor
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occam's_Razor

      • Bobby Johnson
        Sure, if I were looking to actually contract someone to fix a bug for me that is exactly where I would start. I am more interested in this groups opinion and
        Message 3 of 14 , Mar 27, 2009
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          Sure, if I were looking to actually contract someone to fix a bug for me that is exactly where I would start. I am more interested in this groups opinion and thoughts on the problem I have described.

          I guess, my point is that there is a comfort level gap in organizations that make OSS seem nonviable. How can we bridge that gap.

          On Fri, Mar 27, 2009 at 12:29 PM, Tuna Toksoz <tehlike@...> wrote:
          You should submit those to each dev list, there will be better response to your question.


          Tuna Toksöz
          Eternal sunshine of the open source mind.

          http://devlicio.us/blogs/tuna_toksoz
          http://tunatoksoz.com
          http://twitter.com/tehlike





          On Fri, Mar 27, 2009 at 9:18 PM, Bobby Johnson <bobby.johnson+altnetgroup@...> wrote:

          I am a OSS enthusiast and want to use tools like nHibernate in my daily application development practices. What I am not is a CIO or Architect at my company. There are several roadblocks, misconceptions and valid concerns that are raise when I suggest using an OSS tool in one of our projects. One of the biggest concerns I have heard is that of responsibility. The question usually is phrased like this:


          "When we encounter a blocking bug what do we do?"


          The overwhelming OSS response to this is: "Fix it yourself and submit a patch." And this is where I lose management. Management doesn't want to take on the responsibilities of fixing platform bugs. In their eyes it is much easier to purchase packages from vendors who take on those responsibilities. The role of tools like nHibernate, Ninject or even Prism in my environment is to allow me to focus on business value and functionality. We are not a platform company.


          I want to find a solution to this problem, and I think it falls down to money. My company is willing to pay good money to a vendor for a tool that allows us to deliver business value quickly. I wonder if that same cash flow relationship could be applied to OSS.

          Say, I have to make a choice between vendor Product X and nHibernate for ORM. Product X requires a license fee of $1000 per developer. I chose nHibernate and put my $1000 per developer in the bank as a emergency fund.

          Six months later, I encounter a bug or blocking problem in nHibernate that is going to prevent me from releasing my product. I can't fix it myself. I do not have the time or the skill needed to do so. I create a test case for the problem and submit it with a portion of my emergency fund to the community for a solution.

          My question is, do you think anyone would accept it? What if we wanted them to be contractually obligated to fix the bug upon acceptance? Is anyone out there currently doing this? Would any of the current developers want to do this? Is this a viable alternative to vendor software here?

          So here is a list of the OSS tools I would like to use. Anyone out there willing to commit to saying, "Yes, if you can provide me with a test case, I can provide you with a fix for that OSS tool. I charge $X amount per hour or this flat fee."

          • nHibernate
          • Fluent nHibernate
          • Castle Winsor
          • Ninject
          • Rhino.Security
          • Prism
          • MVC Contrib
          • Caliburn

          If your particular pet OSS project is not listed, I would still like to hear from you. This list came of the top of my head from what I am currently interested in.



          --
          "The explanation requiring the fewest assumptions is most likely to be correct."

          - Occam’s Razor
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occam's_Razor






          --
          "The explanation requiring the fewest assumptions is most likely to be correct."

          - Occam’s Razor
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occam's_Razor
        • James Gregory
          For Castle, you should have a look at Castle Stronghold. As for NHibernate, there s pleanty of contributors and I m sure at least one of them would be
          Message 4 of 14 , Mar 27, 2009
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            For Castle, you should have a look at Castle Stronghold. As for NHibernate, there's pleanty of contributors and I'm sure at least one of them would be interested. I'd be willing to talk about Fluent NHibernate support. I bet Nate would be happy for Ninject too.

            In general, I think you're likely to find somebody on most projects that would be willing to accept money for fixes. Getting paid to do OSS work is certainly a dream of mine anyway.

            On Fri, Mar 27, 2009 at 7:39 PM, Bobby Johnson <bobby.johnson+altnetgroup@...> wrote:

            Sure, if I were looking to actually contract someone to fix a bug for me that is exactly where I would start. I am more interested in this groups opinion and thoughts on the problem I have described.

            I guess, my point is that there is a comfort level gap in organizations that make OSS seem nonviable. How can we bridge that gap.



            On Fri, Mar 27, 2009 at 12:29 PM, Tuna Toksoz <tehlike@...> wrote:
            You should submit those to each dev list, there will be better response to your question.


            Tuna Toksöz
            Eternal sunshine of the open source mind.

            http://devlicio.us/blogs/tuna_toksoz
            http://tunatoksoz.com
            http://twitter.com/tehlike





            On Fri, Mar 27, 2009 at 9:18 PM, Bobby Johnson <bobby.johnson+altnetgroup@...> wrote:

            I am a OSS enthusiast and want to use tools like nHibernate in my daily application development practices. What I am not is a CIO or Architect at my company. There are several roadblocks, misconceptions and valid concerns that are raise when I suggest using an OSS tool in one of our projects. One of the biggest concerns I have heard is that of responsibility. The question usually is phrased like this:


            "When we encounter a blocking bug what do we do?"


            The overwhelming OSS response to this is: "Fix it yourself and submit a patch." And this is where I lose management. Management doesn't want to take on the responsibilities of fixing platform bugs. In their eyes it is much easier to purchase packages from vendors who take on those responsibilities. The role of tools like nHibernate, Ninject or even Prism in my environment is to allow me to focus on business value and functionality. We are not a platform company.


            I want to find a solution to this problem, and I think it falls down to money. My company is willing to pay good money to a vendor for a tool that allows us to deliver business value quickly. I wonder if that same cash flow relationship could be applied to OSS.

            Say, I have to make a choice between vendor Product X and nHibernate for ORM. Product X requires a license fee of $1000 per developer. I chose nHibernate and put my $1000 per developer in the bank as a emergency fund.

            Six months later, I encounter a bug or blocking problem in nHibernate that is going to prevent me from releasing my product. I can't fix it myself. I do not have the time or the skill needed to do so. I create a test case for the problem and submit it with a portion of my emergency fund to the community for a solution.

            My question is, do you think anyone would accept it? What if we wanted them to be contractually obligated to fix the bug upon acceptance? Is anyone out there currently doing this? Would any of the current developers want to do this? Is this a viable alternative to vendor software here?

            So here is a list of the OSS tools I would like to use. Anyone out there willing to commit to saying, "Yes, if you can provide me with a test case, I can provide you with a fix for that OSS tool. I charge $X amount per hour or this flat fee."

            • nHibernate
            • Fluent nHibernate
            • Castle Winsor
            • Ninject
            • Rhino.Security
            • Prism
            • MVC Contrib
            • Caliburn

            If your particular pet OSS project is not listed, I would still like to hear from you. This list came of the top of my head from what I am currently interested in.



            --
            "The explanation requiring the fewest assumptions is most likely to be correct."

            - Occam’s Razor
            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occam's_Razor






            --
            "The explanation requiring the fewest assumptions is most likely to be correct."

            - Occam’s Razor
            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occam's_Razor


          • Tuna Toksoz
            There will be people interested in, but you should carefuly define what you need. For example, the scope of a bug is important, also what you consider a bug
            Message 5 of 14 , Mar 27, 2009
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              There will be people interested in, but you should carefuly define what you need.

              For example, the scope of a bug is important, also what you consider a bug may really not be a bug, but a design decision.

              If those are clear, people will be willing more to get paid for what they do.

              Tuna Toksöz
              Eternal sunshine of the open source mind.

              http://devlicio.us/blogs/tuna_toksoz
              http://tunatoksoz.com
              http://twitter.com/tehlike




              On Fri, Mar 27, 2009 at 9:39 PM, Bobby Johnson <bobby.johnson+altnetgroup@...> wrote:

              Sure, if I were looking to actually contract someone to fix a bug for me that is exactly where I would start. I am more interested in this groups opinion and thoughts on the problem I have described.

              I guess, my point is that there is a comfort level gap in organizations that make OSS seem nonviable. How can we bridge that gap.



              On Fri, Mar 27, 2009 at 12:29 PM, Tuna Toksoz <tehlike@...> wrote:
              You should submit those to each dev list, there will be better response to your question.


              Tuna Toksöz
              Eternal sunshine of the open source mind.

              http://devlicio.us/blogs/tuna_toksoz
              http://tunatoksoz.com
              http://twitter.com/tehlike





              On Fri, Mar 27, 2009 at 9:18 PM, Bobby Johnson <bobby.johnson+altnetgroup@...> wrote:

              I am a OSS enthusiast and want to use tools like nHibernate in my daily application development practices. What I am not is a CIO or Architect at my company. There are several roadblocks, misconceptions and valid concerns that are raise when I suggest using an OSS tool in one of our projects. One of the biggest concerns I have heard is that of responsibility. The question usually is phrased like this:


              "When we encounter a blocking bug what do we do?"


              The overwhelming OSS response to this is: "Fix it yourself and submit a patch." And this is where I lose management. Management doesn't want to take on the responsibilities of fixing platform bugs. In their eyes it is much easier to purchase packages from vendors who take on those responsibilities. The role of tools like nHibernate, Ninject or even Prism in my environment is to allow me to focus on business value and functionality. We are not a platform company.


              I want to find a solution to this problem, and I think it falls down to money. My company is willing to pay good money to a vendor for a tool that allows us to deliver business value quickly. I wonder if that same cash flow relationship could be applied to OSS.

              Say, I have to make a choice between vendor Product X and nHibernate for ORM. Product X requires a license fee of $1000 per developer. I chose nHibernate and put my $1000 per developer in the bank as a emergency fund.

              Six months later, I encounter a bug or blocking problem in nHibernate that is going to prevent me from releasing my product. I can't fix it myself. I do not have the time or the skill needed to do so. I create a test case for the problem and submit it with a portion of my emergency fund to the community for a solution.

              My question is, do you think anyone would accept it? What if we wanted them to be contractually obligated to fix the bug upon acceptance? Is anyone out there currently doing this? Would any of the current developers want to do this? Is this a viable alternative to vendor software here?

              So here is a list of the OSS tools I would like to use. Anyone out there willing to commit to saying, "Yes, if you can provide me with a test case, I can provide you with a fix for that OSS tool. I charge $X amount per hour or this flat fee."

              • nHibernate
              • Fluent nHibernate
              • Castle Winsor
              • Ninject
              • Rhino.Security
              • Prism
              • MVC Contrib
              • Caliburn

              If your particular pet OSS project is not listed, I would still like to hear from you. This list came of the top of my head from what I am currently interested in.



              --
              "The explanation requiring the fewest assumptions is most likely to be correct."

              - Occam’s Razor
              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occam's_Razor






              --
              "The explanation requiring the fewest assumptions is most likely to be correct."

              - Occam’s Razor
              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occam's_Razor

            • Mohamed Meligy
              Some open source projects (those run by companies) do this, but very few. It s very interesting that just after reading your message I found myself here:
              Message 6 of 14 , Mar 27, 2009
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                Some open source projects (those run by companies) do this, but very few.

                It's very interesting that just after reading your message I found myself here:
                "Don't Like It? Code it Yourself!"
                http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/archives/001247.html
                Which is basically discussing the same thing (read it, don't just guess from the title).


                Regards,

                --
                Mohamed Ahmed Meligy
                Information Analyst
                Injazat Data Systems

                E-mail: eng.meligy@...
                Weblog: http://weblogs.asp.net/meligy
                Mobile: +971 50 262 3624


                On Fri, Mar 27, 2009 at 11:29 PM, Tuna Toksoz <tehlike@...> wrote:

                You should submit those to each dev list, there will be better response to your question.


                Tuna Toksöz
                Eternal sunshine of the open source mind.

                http://devlicio.us/blogs/tuna_toksoz
                http://tunatoksoz.com
                http://twitter.com/tehlike






                On Fri, Mar 27, 2009 at 9:18 PM, Bobby Johnson <bobby.johnson+altnetgroup@...> wrote:

                I am a OSS enthusiast and want to use tools like nHibernate in my daily application development practices. What I am not is a CIO or Architect at my company. There are several roadblocks, misconceptions and valid concerns that are raise when I suggest using an OSS tool in one of our projects. One of the biggest concerns I have heard is that of responsibility. The question usually is phrased like this:


                "When we encounter a blocking bug what do we do?"


                The overwhelming OSS response to this is: "Fix it yourself and submit a patch." And this is where I lose management. Management doesn't want to take on the responsibilities of fixing platform bugs. In their eyes it is much easier to purchase packages from vendors who take on those responsibilities. The role of tools like nHibernate, Ninject or even Prism in my environment is to allow me to focus on business value and functionality. We are not a platform company.


                I want to find a solution to this problem, and I think it falls down to money. My company is willing to pay good money to a vendor for a tool that allows us to deliver business value quickly. I wonder if that same cash flow relationship could be applied to OSS.

                Say, I have to make a choice between vendor Product X and nHibernate for ORM. Product X requires a license fee of $1000 per developer. I chose nHibernate and put my $1000 per developer in the bank as a emergency fund.

                Six months later, I encounter a bug or blocking problem in nHibernate that is going to prevent me from releasing my product. I can't fix it myself. I do not have the time or the skill needed to do so. I create a test case for the problem and submit it with a portion of my emergency fund to the community for a solution.

                My question is, do you think anyone would accept it? What if we wanted them to be contractually obligated to fix the bug upon acceptance? Is anyone out there currently doing this? Would any of the current developers want to do this? Is this a viable alternative to vendor software here?

                So here is a list of the OSS tools I would like to use. Anyone out there willing to commit to saying, "Yes, if you can provide me with a test case, I can provide you with a fix for that OSS tool. I charge $X amount per hour or this flat fee."

                • nHibernate
                • Fluent nHibernate
                • Castle Winsor
                • Ninject
                • Rhino.Security
                • Prism
                • MVC Contrib
                • Caliburn

                If your particular pet OSS project is not listed, I would still like to hear from you. This list came of the top of my head from what I am currently interested in.



                --
                "The explanation requiring the fewest assumptions is most likely to be correct."

                - Occam’s Razor
                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occam's_Razor


              • Bobby Johnson
                Wow, looks like Jeff and I were on the same thought train recently. ... -- The explanation requiring the fewest assumptions is most likely to be correct. -
                Message 7 of 14 , Mar 27, 2009
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                  Wow, looks like Jeff and I were on the same thought train recently.

                  On Fri, Mar 27, 2009 at 12:48 PM, Mohamed Meligy <Eng.Meligy@...> wrote:
                  Some open source projects (those run by companies) do this, but very few.

                  It's very interesting that just after reading your message I found myself here:
                  "Don't Like It? Code it Yourself!"
                  http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/archives/001247.html
                  Which is basically discussing the same thing (read it, don't just guess from the title).


                  Regards,

                  --
                  Mohamed Ahmed Meligy
                  Information Analyst
                  Injazat Data Systems

                  E-mail: eng.meligy@...
                  Weblog: http://weblogs.asp.net/meligy
                  Mobile: +971 50 262 3624



                  On Fri, Mar 27, 2009 at 11:29 PM, Tuna Toksoz <tehlike@...> wrote:

                  You should submit those to each dev list, there will be better response to your question.


                  Tuna Toksöz
                  Eternal sunshine of the open source mind.

                  http://devlicio.us/blogs/tuna_toksoz
                  http://tunatoksoz.com
                  http://twitter.com/tehlike






                  On Fri, Mar 27, 2009 at 9:18 PM, Bobby Johnson <bobby.johnson+altnetgroup@...> wrote:

                  I am a OSS enthusiast and want to use tools like nHibernate in my daily application development practices. What I am not is a CIO or Architect at my company. There are several roadblocks, misconceptions and valid concerns that are raise when I suggest using an OSS tool in one of our projects. One of the biggest concerns I have heard is that of responsibility. The question usually is phrased like this:


                  "When we encounter a blocking bug what do we do?"


                  The overwhelming OSS response to this is: "Fix it yourself and submit a patch." And this is where I lose management. Management doesn't want to take on the responsibilities of fixing platform bugs. In their eyes it is much easier to purchase packages from vendors who take on those responsibilities. The role of tools like nHibernate, Ninject or even Prism in my environment is to allow me to focus on business value and functionality. We are not a platform company.


                  I want to find a solution to this problem, and I think it falls down to money. My company is willing to pay good money to a vendor for a tool that allows us to deliver business value quickly. I wonder if that same cash flow relationship could be applied to OSS.

                  Say, I have to make a choice between vendor Product X and nHibernate for ORM. Product X requires a license fee of $1000 per developer. I chose nHibernate and put my $1000 per developer in the bank as a emergency fund.

                  Six months later, I encounter a bug or blocking problem in nHibernate that is going to prevent me from releasing my product. I can't fix it myself. I do not have the time or the skill needed to do so. I create a test case for the problem and submit it with a portion of my emergency fund to the community for a solution.

                  My question is, do you think anyone would accept it? What if we wanted them to be contractually obligated to fix the bug upon acceptance? Is anyone out there currently doing this? Would any of the current developers want to do this? Is this a viable alternative to vendor software here?

                  So here is a list of the OSS tools I would like to use. Anyone out there willing to commit to saying, "Yes, if you can provide me with a test case, I can provide you with a fix for that OSS tool. I charge $X amount per hour or this flat fee."

                  • nHibernate
                  • Fluent nHibernate
                  • Castle Winsor
                  • Ninject
                  • Rhino.Security
                  • Prism
                  • MVC Contrib
                  • Caliburn

                  If your particular pet OSS project is not listed, I would still like to hear from you. This list came of the top of my head from what I am currently interested in.



                  --
                  "The explanation requiring the fewest assumptions is most likely to be correct."

                  - Occam’s Razor
                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occam's_Razor







                  --
                  "The explanation requiring the fewest assumptions is most likely to be correct."

                  - Occam’s Razor
                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occam's_Razor
                • Charlie Poole
                  Hi Bobby, Lots of projects do this, provided it s a true bug and not an attempt to use money to push the project in a direction it doesn t want to go. My guess
                  Message 8 of 14 , Mar 27, 2009
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                    Hi Bobby,
                     
                    Lots of projects do this, provided it's a true bug and not an attempt to
                    use money to push the project in a direction it doesn't want to go. My
                    guess is that it's less common in the .NET world simply because of
                    our relative lack of sophistication in Open Source.
                     
                    Charlie


                    From: altdotnet@yahoogroups.com [mailto:altdotnet@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bobby Johnson
                    Sent: Friday, March 27, 2009 12:18 PM
                    To: altdotnet@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [altdotnet] Requesting Contracted .NET OSS Bug Fixes from the Community

                    I am a OSS enthusiast and want to use tools like nHibernate in my daily application development practices. What I am not is a CIO or Architect at my company. There are several roadblocks, misconceptions and valid concerns that are raise when I suggest using an OSS tool in one of our projects. One of the biggest concerns I have heard is that of responsibility. The question usually is phrased like this:


                    "When we encounter a blocking bug what do we do?"


                    The overwhelming OSS response to this is: "Fix it yourself and submit a patch." And this is where I lose management. Management doesn't want to take on the responsibilities of fixing platform bugs. In their eyes it is much easier to purchase packages from vendors who take on those responsibilities. The role of tools like nHibernate, Ninject or even Prism in my environment is to allow me to focus on business value and functionality. We are not a platform company.


                    I want to find a solution to this problem, and I think it falls down to money. My company is willing to pay good money to a vendor for a tool that allows us to deliver business value quickly. I wonder if that same cash flow relationship could be applied to OSS.

                    Say, I have to make a choice between vendor Product X and nHibernate for ORM. Product X requires a license fee of $1000 per developer. I chose nHibernate and put my $1000 per developer in the bank as a emergency fund.

                    Six months later, I encounter a bug or blocking problem in nHibernate that is going to prevent me from releasing my product. I can't fix it myself. I do not have the time or the skill needed to do so. I create a test case for the problem and submit it with a portion of my emergency fund to the community for a solution.

                    My question is, do you think anyone would accept it? What if we wanted them to be contractually obligated to fix the bug upon acceptance? Is anyone out there currently doing this? Would any of the current developers want to do this? Is this a viable alternative to vendor software here?

                    So here is a list of the OSS tools I would like to use. Anyone out there willing to commit to saying, "Yes, if you can provide me with a test case, I can provide you with a fix for that OSS tool. I charge $X amount per hour or this flat fee."

                    • nHibernate
                    • Fluent nHibernate
                    • Castle Winsor
                    • Ninject
                    • Rhino.Security
                    • Prism
                    • MVC Contrib
                    • Caliburn

                    If your particular pet OSS project is not listed, I would still like to hear from you. This list came of the top of my head from what I am currently interested in.



                    --
                    "The explanation requiring the fewest assumptions is most likely to be correct."

                    - Occam’s Razor
                    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occam's_Razor
                  • Peter Morris
                    ... Management doesn t want to take on the responsibilities of fixing platform bugs. In their eyes it is much easier to purchase packages from vendors who take
                    Message 9 of 14 , Mar 27, 2009
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                      >
                      Management doesn't want to take
                      on the responsibilities of fixing platform bugs. In their eyes it is much
                      easier to purchase packages from vendors who take on those responsibilities.
                      <

                      Exactly. And it's not about money, it's about time. If you can save $5,000
                      in licenses but then spend a week fixing an unforseen bug you might cost the
                      company $100,000 in a penalty for a missed deadline or a lost contract.
                      With an OS project the people developing the project have their own
                      priorities and deadlines, with a commercial product the people creating the
                      product need your money and need you to keep coming back to them so they
                      need to impress you (companies may vary obviously).

                      The saying "You get what you pay for" does have credibility. When my
                      employer was commissioned to write a CRM for a very large multi-national
                      company there was no question of us using open-source software, for my ORM I
                      used ECO (from www.capableobjects.com). I encountered a couple of bugs and
                      in both cases they were fixed the same day, to be quite honest if I had had
                      to look at those bugs myself it would have taken me a week to find the bug
                      let alone fix it.


                      Pete
                      ====
                      http://mrpmorris.blogspot.com
                    • Adelle Hartley
                      ... In my experience, paying your development team for a day or a week to work around a bug is a much more common scenario. Adelle.
                      Message 10 of 14 , Mar 29, 2009
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                        Peter Morris wrote:
                        > Management doesn't want to take
                        > on the responsibilities of fixing platform bugs. In their eyes it is much
                        > easier to purchase packages from vendors who take on those responsibilities.
                        > <
                        >
                        > Exactly. And it's not about money, it's about time. If you can save $5,000
                        > in licenses but then spend a week fixing an unforseen bug you might cost the
                        > company $100,000 in a penalty for a missed deadline or a lost contract.
                        > With an OS project the people developing the project have their own
                        > priorities and deadlines, with a commercial product the people creating the
                        > product need your money and need you to keep coming back to them so they
                        > need to impress you (companies may vary obviously).

                        In my experience, paying your development team for a day or a week to
                        work around a bug is a much more common scenario.

                        Adelle.
                      • Eric Hexter
                        I think my company (Headspring) would offer support contacts for some of the OSS projects mentioned above. I know there are enough consulting companies that
                        Message 11 of 14 , Mar 29, 2009
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                          I think my company (Headspring) would offer support contacts for some of the OSS projects mentioned above.  I know there are enough consulting companies that in hard economic times, would be open to setting up similar set-ups.  Granted this is not necessarily a community provided solution, but realistically.  If your companies leadership wants to have a throat to choke if there is some sort of bug that the dev team does not have the bandwidth to deal with, than this would be a good solution.  

                          I am a co-founder of mvccontrib and I would be more than willing to fix a bug someone is having, but realistically it has to be on my schedule.  I have a full time job and small children at home, I cannot drop all of my responsibilities, even if there was a huge pay day.  To me, I want to help the community, but my family comes first.  I think there is a fine line of having some sort of guarantee to the lead time to fix a bug that needs to be part of this equation.  Community vs some sort of Support Contract through a 3rd party company.



                          On Sun, Mar 29, 2009 at 6:55 AM, Adelle Hartley <adelle@...> wrote:
                          Peter Morris wrote:
                          >  Management doesn't want to take
                          > on the responsibilities of fixing platform bugs. In their eyes it is much
                          > easier to purchase packages from vendors who take on those responsibilities.
                          > <
                          >
                          > Exactly.  And it's not about money, it's about time.  If you can save $5,000
                          > in licenses but then spend a week fixing an unforseen bug you might cost the
                          > company $100,000 in a penalty for a missed deadline or a lost contract.
                          > With an OS project the people developing the project have their own
                          > priorities and deadlines, with a commercial product the people creating the
                          > product need your money and need you to keep coming back to them so they
                          > need to impress you (companies may vary obviously).

                          In my experience, paying your development team for a day or a week to
                          work around a bug is a much more common scenario.

                          Adelle.


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                        • Peter Morris
                          ... A 3rd party bug? I have never experienced this. Every one I have worked for has always wanted the owner of the source to fix their own bug whilst I get
                          Message 12 of 14 , Mar 30, 2009
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                            > In my experience, paying your development team for a day or a week to
                            > work around a bug is a much more common scenario.

                            A 3rd party bug? I have never experienced this. Every one I have worked
                            for has always wanted the owner of the source to fix their own bug whilst I
                            get on with something else.



                            Pete
                            ====
                            http://mrpmorris.blogspot.com
                          • Bobby Johnson
                            Thank you for all the responses, especially from the folks who work on projects I mentioned. I wanted to point out that I am not actively looking for a
                            Message 13 of 14 , Apr 1 8:23 AM
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                              Thank you for all the responses, especially from the folks who work on projects I mentioned. I wanted to point out that I am not actively looking for a contract, more of a discussion of the problem at hand. After rereading my free from train of thought email, I can understand why the real question might have been missed.

                              My real question is how do you, the active alt.net developer, overcome management's perceived risk with OSS tools? Anyone have stories or guidance on how you were able to introduce say nHibenrate with managements buy off?

                              On Mon, Mar 30, 2009 at 12:39 AM, Peter Morris <mrpmorris@...> wrote:
                              > In my experience, paying your development team for a day or a week to
                              > work around a bug is a much more common scenario.

                              A 3rd party bug?  I have never experienced this.  Every one I have worked
                              for has always wanted the owner of the source to fix their own bug whilst I
                              get on with something else.



                              Pete
                              ====
                              http://mrpmorris.blogspot.com



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                            • DannyT
                              Ask management how many platform bugs they ve convinced vendors to fix without having to wait for the next point release and/or paying for the next
                              Message 14 of 14 , Apr 2 8:15 AM
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                                Ask 'management' how many 'platform' bugs they've convinced vendors to fix without having to wait for the next point release and/or paying for the next upgrade.

                                It's not uncommon on these projects to see bugs reported and fixed within the same day, for free.


                                2009/4/1 Bobby Johnson <bobby.johnson+altnetgroup@...>

                                Thank you for all the responses, especially from the folks who work on projects I mentioned. I wanted to point out that I am not actively looking for a contract, more of a discussion of the problem at hand. After rereading my free from train of thought email, I can understand why the real question might have been missed.

                                My real question is how do you, the active alt.net developer, overcome management's perceived risk with OSS tools? Anyone have stories or guidance on how you were able to introduce say nHibenrate with managements buy off?



                                On Mon, Mar 30, 2009 at 12:39 AM, Peter Morris <mrpmorris@...> wrote:
                                > In my experience, paying your development team for a day or a week to
                                > work around a bug is a much more common scenario.

                                A 3rd party bug?  I have never experienced this.  Every one I have worked
                                for has always wanted the owner of the source to fix their own bug whilst I
                                get on with something else.



                                Pete
                                ====
                                http://mrpmorris.blogspot.com



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