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How to sell 8080b??

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  • ssb73q
    Hi, I was surprised to find this group. I was involved in the microcomputer revolution during the 1970 s and built a few MITS 8080b and Sol Processor
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 15 5:05 PM
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      Hi, I was surprised to find this group. I was involved in the
      microcomputer revolution during the 1970's and built a few MITS
      8080b and Sol Processor Technology computers. Even developed the
      first micro based system used by my company (using a 4004). I'm now
      long retired.

      I still have 2 8080b (and 2 Sol Processor Technologies) in my
      basement collecting dust, my wife insists I throw them out. I also
      probably have at least 50 S100 boards (now without documentation),
      (memory, serial, speech recognition, etc.). I notice that on eBay
      people are buying these relics?

      Any advice on how I should prep these items for sale? Where is the
      best place to sell them? What can I expect them to go for?

      TIA

      Regards,
      Richard
    • Erik S. Klein
      Hello Richard, The things that contribute to the value of these old systems are condition, originality, completeness and documentation. Condition applies to
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 16 6:36 PM
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        Hello Richard,



        The things that contribute to the value of these old systems are
        condition, originality, completeness and documentation.



        Condition applies to both the cosmetics and the functionality. Clean
        working machines are the best. If yours are dusty or grimy you may want
        to spiff them up a bit. . . carefully.



        Original machines are built to the specs that they would have been when
        new (in and around 1977, in this case.) For an 8800B you're going to
        want to have the original switches and at least a MITS CPU card.
        Additional MITS cards will help as will other "period" cards. Date
        codes on the components should be around when the machine was produced.
        Yours with a black plastic 8080 dated in the mid-1980s would be less
        original, for instance.



        Complete machines will have everything needed to plug in and run.
        Drives (tape or disk), Paper Tape readers, terminals, etc. all
        contribute. An empty chassis sits on one end of the scale while a
        complete system with 48K of RAM, PROMS, drives, software, etc. sits on
        the other.



        Every part of the machine should, ideally, be documented. The original
        MITS binders with the assembly and operations manuals, manuals for any
        additional cards and whatever else exists are ideal. Other forms of
        documentation such as chip spec sheets, period magazines and the like
        also help.



        You've got several options to sell. EBay is always popular and the
        Vintage Computer Marketplace (marketplace.vintage.org) is dedicated to
        old computers and related items. You can also just advertise your gear
        to the appropriate lists (here, various newsgroups, forums like the
        Vintage Computer Forum (www.vintage-computer.com/vcforum - my favorite!)
        and mail lists) and select from the offers that come in from those.



        I've got some detailed records of eBay sales of Altair systems from the
        last couple of years. They fluctuate wildly, but there may be some
        useful information in there for you. Just ask if you want it.



        Best of luck with your sales. I'm interested in adding both types of
        machines to my collection so there's a chance I'll be a buyer. . .



        Erik Klein

        www.vintage-computer.com <http://www.vintage-computer.com/>

        www.vintage-computer.com/vcfourm

        The Vintage Computer Forum







        -----Original Message-----
        From: ssb73q [mailto:ssb73q@...]
        Sent: Sunday, August 15, 2004 5:06 PM
        To: altaircomputerclub@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Altair Computer Club] How to sell 8080b??



        Hi, I was surprised to find this group. I was involved in the
        microcomputer revolution during the 1970's and built a few MITS
        8080b and Sol Processor Technology computers. Even developed the
        first micro based system used by my company (using a 4004). I'm now
        long retired.

        I still have 2 8080b (and 2 Sol Processor Technologies) in my
        basement collecting dust, my wife insists I throw them out. I also
        probably have at least 50 S100 boards (now without documentation),
        (memory, serial, speech recognition, etc.). I notice that on eBay
        people are buying these relics?

        Any advice on how I should prep these items for sale? Where is the
        best place to sell them? What can I expect them to go for?

        TIA

        Regards,
        Richard




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      • Steve
        Richard, I would add one more point: If you plan to sell on ebay or another auction site, a good description and good, clear, detailed photos can affect the
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 17 11:35 AM
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          Richard,

          I would add one more point: If you plan to sell on ebay or another
          auction site, a good description and good, clear, detailed photos can
          affect the selling price as much as anything else. Considering what
          the computer could sell for, it's worth the extra effort to do it
          right.

          Everything Eric and Doug said is very important, but much of that can
          be negated by a lousy description. Personally, I don't bid much
          on "pigs in a poke" with one-line discriptions and blurry postage
          stamp photos (I think a lot of ebay auctions are written by people
          who view them as newspaper classified ads where they're charged for
          every word and picture. Ebay has no practical limits on the length
          of descriptions or the number or size of photos. If you host your
          own pictures, 5 pages of text with 20 photos costs exactly the same
          as a 1-line writeup with no pictures. Electrons are cheap).

          By the way, let me put in a plug for ebay's free auction-writing
          program called "TurboLister". It's very flexible and allows one to
          create a complete ad very easily, with pictures, text, and hyperlinks.

          If you decide to auction your items, you're welcome to post a link to
          the auctions here.

          Steve
          ===================

          --- In altaircomputerclub@yahoogroups.com, "Erik S. Klein"
          <Lifo@p...> wrote:
          > Hello Richard,
          >
          >
          >
          > The things that contribute to the value of these old systems are
          > condition, originality, completeness and documentation.
          >
          >
          >
          > Condition applies to both the cosmetics and the functionality.
          Clean
          > working machines are the best. If yours are dusty or grimy you may
          want
          > to spiff them up a bit. . . carefully.
          >
          >
          >
          > Original machines are built to the specs that they would have been
          when
          > new (in and around 1977, in this case.) For an 8800B you're going
          to
          > want to have the original switches and at least a MITS CPU card.
          > Additional MITS cards will help as will other "period" cards. Date
          > codes on the components should be around when the machine was
          produced.
          > Yours with a black plastic 8080 dated in the mid-1980s would be less
          > original, for instance.
          >
          >
          >
          > Complete machines will have everything needed to plug in and run.
          > Drives (tape or disk), Paper Tape readers, terminals, etc. all
          > contribute. An empty chassis sits on one end of the scale while a
          > complete system with 48K of RAM, PROMS, drives, software, etc. sits
          on
          > the other.
          >
          >
          >
          > Every part of the machine should, ideally, be documented. The
          original
          > MITS binders with the assembly and operations manuals, manuals for
          any
          > additional cards and whatever else exists are ideal. Other forms of
          > documentation such as chip spec sheets, period magazines and the
          like
          > also help.
          >
          >
          >
          > You've got several options to sell. EBay is always popular and the
          > Vintage Computer Marketplace (marketplace.vintage.org) is dedicated
          to
          > old computers and related items. You can also just advertise your
          gear
          > to the appropriate lists (here, various newsgroups, forums like the
          > Vintage Computer Forum (www.vintage-computer.com/vcforum - my
          favorite!)
          > and mail lists) and select from the offers that come in from those.
          >
          >
          >
          > I've got some detailed records of eBay sales of Altair systems from
          the
          > last couple of years. They fluctuate wildly, but there may be some
          > useful information in there for you. Just ask if you want it.
          >
          >
          >
          > Best of luck with your sales. I'm interested in adding both types
          of
          > machines to my collection so there's a chance I'll be a buyer. . .
          >
          >
          >
          > Erik Klein
          >
          > www.vintage-computer.com <http://www.vintage-computer.com/>
          >
          > www.vintage-computer.com/vcfourm
          >
          > The Vintage Computer Forum
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: ssb73q [mailto:ssb73q@r...]
          > Sent: Sunday, August 15, 2004 5:06 PM
          > To: altaircomputerclub@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [Altair Computer Club] How to sell 8080b??
          >
          >
          >
          > Hi, I was surprised to find this group. I was involved in the
          > microcomputer revolution during the 1970's and built a few MITS
          > 8080b and Sol Processor Technology computers. Even developed the
          > first micro based system used by my company (using a 4004). I'm now
          > long retired.
          >
          > I still have 2 8080b (and 2 Sol Processor Technologies) in my
          > basement collecting dust, my wife insists I throw them out. I also
          > probably have at least 50 S100 boards (now without documentation),
          > (memory, serial, speech recognition, etc.). I notice that on eBay
          > people are buying these relics?
          >
          > Any advice on how I should prep these items for sale? Where is the
          > best place to sell them? What can I expect them to go for?
          >
          > TIA
          >
          > Regards,
          > Richard
          >
          >
        • ssb73q
          Thank you all very much for your replies and the useful information. Looks like I ll have a very good winter project dusting old computers off and testing
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 29 4:56 PM
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            Thank you all very much for your replies and the useful information.
            Looks like I'll have a very good winter project dusting old computers
            off and testing them. I think I still have 8080 neumonics sheets
            somewhere. If the machines still work, I'm thinking of keeping them
            for sentimental value. However, my wife will have a different
            opinion. <VBG> I used to love those blinking lights. Thanks again.

            I may still have some ceramic 8080 chip sets (and other period ICs)
            around. Is there any value for them?

            Regards,
            Richard


            --- In altaircomputerclub@yahoogroups.com, "ssb73q" <ssb73q@r...>
            wrote:
            > Hi, I was surprised to find this group. I was involved in the
            > microcomputer revolution during the 1970's and built a few MITS
            > 8080b and Sol Processor Technology computers. Even developed the
            > first micro based system used by my company (using a 4004). I'm now
            > long retired.
            >
            > I still have 2 8080b (and 2 Sol Processor Technologies) in my
            > basement collecting dust, my wife insists I throw them out. I also
            > probably have at least 50 S100 boards (now without documentation),
            > (memory, serial, speech recognition, etc.). I notice that on eBay
            > people are buying these relics?
            >
            > Any advice on how I should prep these items for sale? Where is the
            > best place to sell them? What can I expect them to go for?
            >
            > TIA
            >
            > Regards,
            > Richard
          • Erik S. Klein
            The 8080 chips are still of value. Check the markings, though, an 8080A is worth a few bucks, an 8080 or an 8080-? are worth quite a bit more. Best of luck!
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 29 7:44 PM
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              The 8080 chips are still of value. Check the markings, though, an 8080A
              is worth a few bucks, an 8080 or an 8080-? are worth quite a bit more.



              Best of luck!



              Erik Klein

              www.vintage-computer.com <http://www.vintage-computer.com/>

              www.vintage-computer.com/vcforum

              The Vintage Computer Forum





              -----Original Message-----
              From: ssb73q [mailto:ssb73q@...]
              Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2004 4:56 PM
              To: altaircomputerclub@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [Altair Computer Club] Re: How to sell 8080b??



              Thank you all very much for your replies and the useful information.
              Looks like I'll have a very good winter project dusting old computers
              off and testing them. I think I still have 8080 neumonics sheets
              somewhere. If the machines still work, I'm thinking of keeping them
              for sentimental value. However, my wife will have a different
              opinion. <VBG> I used to love those blinking lights. Thanks again.

              I may still have some ceramic 8080 chip sets (and other period ICs)
              around. Is there any value for them?

              Regards,
              Richard


              --- In altaircomputerclub@yahoogroups.com, "ssb73q" <ssb73q@r...>
              wrote:
              > Hi, I was surprised to find this group. I was involved in the
              > microcomputer revolution during the 1970's and built a few MITS
              > 8080b and Sol Processor Technology computers. Even developed the
              > first micro based system used by my company (using a 4004). I'm now
              > long retired.
              >
              > I still have 2 8080b (and 2 Sol Processor Technologies) in my
              > basement collecting dust, my wife insists I throw them out. I also
              > probably have at least 50 S100 boards (now without documentation),
              > (memory, serial, speech recognition, etc.). I notice that on eBay
              > people are buying these relics?
              >
              > Any advice on how I should prep these items for sale? Where is the
              > best place to sell them? What can I expect them to go for?
              >
              > TIA
              >
              > Regards,
              > Richard






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              * To visit your group on the web, go to:
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              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Steve
              Richard, The easiest way to check the value of any old item is to visit eBay and look at the final selling price of COMPLETED auctions of similar items. I
              Message 6 of 6 , Aug 30 10:24 AM
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                Richard,

                The easiest way to check the value of any old item is to visit eBay
                and look at the final selling price of COMPLETED auctions of similar
                items. I think you have to be registered to view the completed
                auctions.

                It seems like almost any old chip with white ceramic and gold pins
                has collector appeal, so you certainly shouldn't throw those types
                away.

                steve
                ===========================

                --- In altaircomputerclub@yahoogroups.com, "Erik S. Klein"
                <Lifo@p...> wrote:
                > The 8080 chips are still of value. Check the markings, though, an
                8080A
                > is worth a few bucks, an 8080 or an 8080-? are worth quite a bit
                more.
                >
                >
                >
                > Best of luck!
                >
                >
                >
                > Erik Klein
                >
                > www.vintage-computer.com <http://www.vintage-computer.com/>
                >
                > www.vintage-computer.com/vcforum
                >
                > The Vintage Computer Forum
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: ssb73q [mailto:ssb73q@r...]
                > Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2004 4:56 PM
                > To: altaircomputerclub@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: [Altair Computer Club] Re: How to sell 8080b??
                >
                >
                >
                > Thank you all very much for your replies and the useful
                information.
                > Looks like I'll have a very good winter project dusting old
                computers
                > off and testing them. I think I still have 8080 neumonics sheets
                > somewhere. If the machines still work, I'm thinking of keeping them
                > for sentimental value. However, my wife will have a different
                > opinion. <VBG> I used to love those blinking lights. Thanks again.
                >
                > I may still have some ceramic 8080 chip sets (and other period ICs)
                > around. Is there any value for them?
                >
                > Regards,
                > Richard
                >
                >
                > --- In altaircomputerclub@yahoogroups.com, "ssb73q" <ssb73q@r...>
                > wrote:
                > > Hi, I was surprised to find this group. I was involved in the
                > > microcomputer revolution during the 1970's and built a few MITS
                > > 8080b and Sol Processor Technology computers. Even developed the
                > > first micro based system used by my company (using a 4004). I'm
                now
                > > long retired.
                > >
                > > I still have 2 8080b (and 2 Sol Processor Technologies) in my
                > > basement collecting dust, my wife insists I throw them out. I
                also
                > > probably have at least 50 S100 boards (now without
                documentation),
                > > (memory, serial, speech recognition, etc.). I notice that on
                eBay
                > > people are buying these relics?
                > >
                > > Any advice on how I should prep these items for sale? Where is
                the
                > > best place to sell them? What can I expect them to go for?
                > >
                > > TIA
                > >
                > > Regards,
                > > Richard
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