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DONT Teach BUT PLAY the basics of Arithmetic.

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  • Chitra R
    Dear Mr.Malcom this link was posted earlier by a member. it is wonderful. http://donpotter.net please open the maths link. The books are very very simple,
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 10, 2010
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      Dear Mr.Malcom

      this link was posted earlier by a member. it is wonderful.
      http://donpotter.net
      please open the maths link. The books are very very simple, interesting and the exercises given are so much alike the real world.

      (AND A BIG THANK YOU FOR THE MEMBER WHO HAD POSTED THE ABOVE WEBSITE. Am sorry don't remember who it was.)

      I hope you are not anxious about her learning mathematics. Please go slow. There might be some inner difficulty in the child, which might get aggravated if you panic.
      Play maths, don't try to teach. My elder daughter is 9yrs now, and it is only a few days ago that i realized this!



      Warm regards
      Chitra

      --- On Wed, 10/2/10, Malcolm Printer <malcolmrprinter@...> wrote:

      From: Malcolm Printer <malcolmrprinter@...>
      Subject: [alt-ed-india] Teaching a child the basics of Arithmetic.
      To: alt-ed-india@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Wednesday, 10 February, 2010, 6:15 PM

       

      Dear friends,
       
      My 8 year old daughter is experiencing difficulties in learning multiplication, addition and subtraction. Can you advise me about creative methods to support her in learning these concepts well? Thank you!
       
      With love,
       
      Malcolm R. Printer



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    • Bhuvana Venkat
      check out www.makingmathmorefun.com Teresa Evans has a set of books making basic arithmetic fun. However well your child understands the concept of
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 10, 2010
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        check out
        www.makingmathmorefun.com
        Teresa Evans has a set of books making basic arithmetic fun.
        However well your child understands the concept of multiplication learning the tables is inevitable. To this end, http://www.bigbrainz.com/Download.html is a fun game.

         
        Check out http://www.homeschoolmath.net/online/addition_subtraction.php which is also an excellent source of math resources.
        regards
        bhuvana


        To: alt-ed-india@yahoogroups.com
        From: malcolmrprinter@...
        Date: Wed, 10 Feb 2010 04:45:28 -0800
        Subject: [alt-ed-india] Teaching a child the basics of Arithmetic.

         
        Dear friends,
         
        My 8 year old daughter is experiencing difficulties in learning multiplication, addition and subtraction. Can you advise me about creative methods to support her in learning these concepts well? Thank you!
         
        With love,
         
        Malcolm R. Printer




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      • lakshmi prabha
        Dear Malcolm, The best help you can ever get would be from Jodogyan.Its a non profit organisation situated in Delhi which runs a school for the slum children
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 11, 2010
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          Dear Malcolm,
          The best help you can ever get would be from Jodogyan.Its a non profit organisation situated in Delhi which runs a school for the slum children from the funds obtained from mathematical toys and conducting Maths workshops for teachers in schools all over the country.Its main objective is to make maths learning interesting and full of fun for each and every child.Please log in to www.jodogyan.org for further information.
          Regards,
          Lakshmi
        • krish_shesh
          Dear Malcolm, You could try the Trachtenberg system of basic math. It is simple, powerful and great fun. For an introductory article see
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 12, 2010
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            Dear Malcolm,

            You could try the Trachtenberg system of basic math. It is simple, powerful and great fun. For an introductory article see

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trachtenberg_system

            There is also an Indian edition of the book "The Trachtenberg Speed System of Basic Mathematics" by Ann Cutler and Rudolph McShane published by Rupa and Co; this a translation and adaptation of Trachtenberg's original book of 1960. Highly recommended, since I found that using it made a difference to my 9-year old son's attitude toward math.

            Hope this helps, Sheshadri.

            --- In alt-ed-india@yahoogroups.com, Malcolm Printer <malcolmrprinter@...> wrote:
            >
            > Dear friends,
            >  
            > My 8 year old daughter is experiencing difficulties in learning multiplication, addition and subtraction. Can you advise me about creative methods to support her in learning these concepts well? Thank you!
            >  
            > With love,
            >  
            > Malcolm R. Printer
            >
          • Lalita
            Hi all, I happen to be a weird person (according my daughter) who was not daunted by Maths, even as a child. I also have an older sister, who always failed
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 12, 2010
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              Hi all,

              I happen to be a 'weird person' (according my daughter) who was not daunted by Maths, even as a child. I also have an older sister, who always failed in maths during school days; but finds herself very comfortable with math calculations as an adult! I leave you to draw your own conclusions on how this could be possible!

              My personal opinion is that alternative methods as Vedic mathematics or this Trachtenberg system etc would be fun for those who can cross-check the fundas and see why they work in the first place and then apply them as short-cut methods, as informed individuals.

              Why confuse a child who is already grappling with the basic stuff by introducing random methodologies which would involve rote learning to a certain extent; while gaining no real insight into how we are arriving at the answer? Would it not be better to let them use the straight-forward methods only; in a fun way?

              Also, it is very important for the child to be NOT consider his/herself to be somehow inferior/worthless for the inability to get maths easily. We all know it ultimately boils down to which side of a person's brain is dominant in its use.

              Warm Regards,
              Lalita


            • Venugopal Maddukuri
              Hurray Lalitha ! Way to go ! Venugopal Maddukuri +91 9880 063 252
              Message 6 of 9 , Feb 13, 2010
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                Hurray Lalitha ! Way to go !


                Venugopal Maddukuri
                +91 9880 063 252


                On Sat, Feb 13, 2010 at 11:50 AM, Lalita <lalita.sv@gmail.com> wrote:
                 

                Hi all,

                I happen to be a 'weird person' (according my daughter) who was not daunted by Maths, even as a child. I also have an older sister, who always failed in maths during school days; but finds herself very comfortable with math calculations as an adult! I leave you to draw your own conclusions on how this could be possible!

                My personal opinion is that alternative methods as Vedic mathematics or this Trachtenberg system etc would be fun for those who can cross-check the fundas and see why they work in the first place and then apply them as short-cut methods, as informed individuals.

                Why confuse a child who is already grappling with the basic stuff by introducing random methodologies which would involve rote learning to a certain extent; while gaining no real insight into how we are arriving at the answer? Would it not be better to let them use the straight-forward methods only; in a fun way?

                Also, it is very important for the child to be NOT consider his/herself to be somehow inferior/worthless for the inability to get maths easily. We all know it ultimately boils down to which side of a person's brain is dominant in its use.

                Warm Regards,
                Lalita



              • Venugopal Maddukuri
                Oops.... Lalita Venugopal Maddukuri +91 9880 063 252
                Message 7 of 9 , Feb 13, 2010
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                  Oops.... Lalita


                  Venugopal Maddukuri
                  +91 9880 063 252


                  On Sat, Feb 13, 2010 at 5:21 PM, Venugopal Maddukuri <madvenu@...> wrote:
                  Hurray Lalitha ! Way to go !


                  Venugopal Maddukuri
                  +91 9880 063 252



                  On Sat, Feb 13, 2010 at 11:50 AM, Lalita <lalita.sv@gmail.com> wrote:
                   

                  Hi all,

                  I happen to be a 'weird person' (according my daughter) who was not daunted by Maths, even as a child. I also have an older sister, who always failed in maths during school days; but finds herself very comfortable with math calculations as an adult! I leave you to draw your own conclusions on how this could be possible!

                  My personal opinion is that alternative methods as Vedic mathematics or this Trachtenberg system etc would be fun for those who can cross-check the fundas and see why they work in the first place and then apply them as short-cut methods, as informed individuals.

                  Why confuse a child who is already grappling with the basic stuff by introducing random methodologies which would involve rote learning to a certain extent; while gaining no real insight into how we are arriving at the answer? Would it not be better to let them use the straight-forward methods only; in a fun way?

                  Also, it is very important for the child to be NOT consider his/herself to be somehow inferior/worthless for the inability to get maths easily. We all know it ultimately boils down to which side of a person's brain is dominant in its use.

                  Warm Regards,
                  Lalita




                • deeps@britindia.com
                  Appreciate the references provided by various members. But I would, in addition, look forward to methods tried with our children - so we know some newer ones.
                  Message 8 of 9 , Feb 16, 2010
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                    Appreciate the references provided by various members.
                    But I would, in addition, look forward to methods tried with our children -
                    so we know some newer ones.

                    Please share, freely, whatever you are doing at home.

                    Cheers, Deepa
                    Those who wish to sing always find a song !!!
                    visit www.britannia.co.in



                    Bhuvana Venkat
                    <bhuva78@hotmail.
                    com> To
                    Sent by: <alt-ed-india@yahoogroups.com>
                    alt-ed-india@yaho cc
                    ogroups.com
                    Subject
                    RE: [alt-ed-india] Teaching a child
                    11-02-10 10:53 AM the basics of Arithmetic.


                    Please respond to
                    alt-ed-india@yaho
                    ogroups.com






                    check out
                    www.makingmathmorefun.com
                    Teresa Evans has a set of books making basic arithmetic fun.
                    However well your child understands the concept of multiplication learning
                    the tables is inevitable. To this end,
                    http://www.bigbrainz.com/Download.html is a fun game.

                    Check out http://www.homeschoolmath.net/online/addition_subtraction.php
                    which is also an excellent source of math resources.
                    regards
                    bhuvana

                    To: alt-ed-india@yahoogroups.com
                    From: malcolmrprinter@...
                    Date: Wed, 10 Feb 2010 04:45:28 -0800
                    Subject: [alt-ed-india] Teaching a child the basics of Arithmetic.



                    Dear friends,

                    My 8 year old daughter is experiencing difficulties in learning multiplication, addition and subtraction. Can you
                    advise me about creative methods to support her in learning these concepts well? Thank you!

                    With love,

                    Malcolm R. Printer





                    Hotmail: Trusted email with Microsoft’s powerful SPAM protection. Sign up
                    now.



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