Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [alt-ed-india] English

Expand Messages
  • S P Mathew
    Thank you George for your wise inputs! ________________________________ From: George Mangalath Thomas To: alt-ed
    Message 1 of 16 , Apr 17, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Thank you George for your wise inputs!



      From: George Mangalath Thomas <gt.crossfire@...>
      To: alt-ed <alt-ed-india@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, 15 April 2013 9:47 AM
      Subject: Re: [alt-ed-india] English

       
      Arun,

      I can - like the other parents - only make recommendations that worked in our case.

      My wife and I love books - we read voraciously and have very decided views on our favourite authors.

      My older child - my daughter - was independent minded enough to learn on her own and very early refused to let us read to her.

      My son was another story - he flatly refused to read and hated writing.

      I believe interest to be the key motivational factor in learning anything.

      We have a stack of Asterix and Tintin comics - we would read to him from them and often leave the story unfinished. He started reading a short while later. These days it takes dynamite to get a book out of his hands.

      Much older, he acquired an interest in strategy based computer games. A lot of these were based on Greek mythology. This piqued his interest and he devoured all he could find on the subject, including the Iliad and the Odyssey. He is now an expert on the subject - it is dangerous to ask him about any of the Greek gods as you are likely to receive an hour's lecture on the abilities and the relationship of the gods.

      He still hates writing. Largely because his fingers cannot keep pace with his mind.

      All children are born with imagination. As one who earns his living with the controlled use of my imagination, I can tell you that there is nothing worse than trying to steer that raw talent into an area that you believe it should grow. Leave your son to develop in his own way and his own pace. Deduce his interests and encourage them - no matter how inappropriate you may deem their direction.

      You have a great part to ply in your son's development. Make it enjoyable for him and yourself. Throw all the texts and the learners out, put an arm around him and chat about anything - monkey's ears, the shape of clouds and melting ice-cream on a hot day.

      You will both be the better for it.

      He may not get great marks, but who really wants a performing monkey?

      I envy you - you have a wonderful time ahead.

      Good luck...

      George
       




      On 14 April 2013 17:30, Arun Kumar Mahajan <arun.mahajan@...> wrote:
       
      Hi All,
       
      I have a son of 13 years old and studying in 7th standard in regular school. He is quite weak in English. Tried various options to improve his english but in vain. Till now I tried following options, which failed miserably:
       
      1.       Reading along with him a book chapter, English Newspaper. (Not able to inspire him to do it on his own)
      2.       Asking him to learn about 5 new words in a week. (He is inconsistent. Perhaps my fault. I can’t find ways to repeat those words. Just listening word meaning is a boring job)
      3.       Writing a paragraph. (Again failed as his imagination is quite limited and failed to make a story around a topic)
       
      I know the major failure is on my part. I need to learn a bit more. I’d be greatful if you can help me:
       
      1.       To understand some intersting ways to teach him language
      2.       To have some material on english langague.
      3.       To have some sort of interesting test material his caliber time to time.
      4.       Some online useful llinks.
      5.       Some other suggestion for me as well.
       
      With Warm Regards,
      Arun Mahajan



      This e-mail message and its attachments are for the sole use of the intended recipients. It may contain proprietary, confidential, privileged information or other information subject to legal restrictions. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please do not read, copy, use or disclose this message or its attachments. Please notify the sender immediately and destroy all copies of this message and any attachments.
      WARNING: This e-mail message including attachment(s), if any, is believed to be free of any virus. However, it is the responsibility of the recipient to ensure for absence of viruses. Aircel shall not be held responsible nor does it accept any liability for any damage arising in any way from its use.



      --
      George Mangalath Thomas
      Crossfire Films, Bombay INDIA

      skype: gt.mangalath

      crossfirefilms.com        Films: youtube.com/crossfirefilm



    • Sharla Chakravarthy Joseph
      Arun, An adaptation of paragraph writing that you could try: Give him a paragraph to read. It should be on a topic of interest to him and below his current
      Message 2 of 16 , Apr 17, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Arun,
        An adaptation of paragraph writing that you could try:

        Give him a paragraph to read.  It should be on a topic of interest to him and below his current reading level (something that will be easy for him to read).
        Show him how to outline the paragraph by choosing up to 3 key words for each sentence.
        Have him check his outline with you or someone else by reading his outline aloud while the other person looks at the paragraph. (Here it is important that he has the main ideas, not every point).
        Then, ask him to rewrite the paragraph in his own words, using only his outline.

        By rewriting, the problem of not knowing what to write is solved.
        Also, you can help him to write a second draft, by showing him where corrections are needed.  Be sure not to nit-pick about what he has written (content), but just make sure all the sentences are complete and words spelled correctly.  

        This technique is thought to aid both in writing and in reading comprehension.
        Sharla


        On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 5:16 PM, Sharla Chakravarthy Joseph <sharlachakravarthy@...> wrote:
        An anecdote:

        One of my relatives struggled with reading as a child.  Any number of special books and classes didn't seem to help.  But, in the teen years, he got interested in a game that involved reading manuals.  And he started reading, completed BSc and is still reading today.

        Another relative, with moderate dyslexia, was allowed to read their choice of easy story books, and over time, their reading fluency and comprehension improved.

        Some thoughts:

        First language skill and literacy are essential for academics and for life.  It is worthwhile to keep trying any strategy that can encourage children to read and write, listen and speak the language.  The great thing about language is that one can practice it by reading, writing, listening and speaking about any topic (including movies).

        It is worth asking why, for what purpose, a student is learning second and third languages.  Is it merely for exams or will there be some lasting benefit for knowing and using that language?

        In my ideal India, second language exams would focus more on communication skills in everyday life instead of 'high' language and classical literature.



        On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 4:28 PM, Nagesh Kolagani <nagesh333@...> wrote:
         

        Yes, into 13 seems to call for a different sort of parenting. In earlier years children run on our energies, and our passions. Past 13 they seem to need to find their passions and then their energies. And what inspires us need not inspire them ! In my wisdom, I may say good marks are important for the future. In their wisdom they may reject it. And at this age, their wisdom may be based on a very simple process of opposing parental wisdom. Anyway we were also once 13.
         
        As Hema said, if you drop your anxiety - they have extremely sensitive antennae - and simply create an environment of fun english (maybe even a lot of english movies), there is a better chance.
         
        Much easier to inculcate habits before 10 ! Manu says that after 16 a child is to be treated as afriend and an equal. In the Kaliyuga the age seems to have become 10-13 !
         
        Aparna
         

         
        On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 3:17 PM, Hema <hgopinathan@...> wrote:
         

        Dear Arun,

        You are failing to teach your son English the way I'm failing to teach my daughter Hindi. The language is a struggle for me as a Tamilian. It is not the spoken language at home and there isn't enough literature or speakers around for them to learn it naturally the way they learnt English, Marathi, Kumaoni etc.
        If your son is learning his other subjects in an English medium school, then he is learning English anyway. He is 13- you cannot force a child of that age to do anything they don't want to- they'll just put up their backs. What is your objective in teaching him the language? Is it to pass his exams, is it to engender a love for the language or are you ashamed, embarrassed, worried- you need to ask yourself those questions.
        If it is not the primary language of communication at home, he will be not great at it till he chooses to learn it for himself. In the meanwhile, can you not just back off? Leave lots of comics, popular music, movies around.
        After watching the movies, discuss it with him, but lightly, with genuine interest- not like a test. If he wishes to discuss it in the language of his choice, let him do so.
        Can you get him a penfriend of his age ( a girl preferably:)) from abroad- not emails, proper snail-mail letters?
        Can you invite a house-guest to stay for a bit, who will speak only in English and maybe your son can take him/her around?
        No language can be learnt in a short time. Patience is the key.

        Regards,

        Hema Sah

        --- In alt-ed-india@yahoogroups.com, Arun Kumar Mahajan <arun.mahajan@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi All,
        >
        > I have a son of 13 years old and studying in 7th standard in regular school. He is quite weak in English. Tried various options to improve his english but in vain. Till now I tried following options, which failed miserably:
        >
        >
        > 1. Reading along with him a book chapter, English Newspaper. (Not able to inspire him to do it on his own)
        >
        > 2. Asking him to learn about 5 new words in a week. (He is inconsistent. Perhaps my fault. I can't find ways to repeat those words. Just listening word meaning is a boring job)
        >
        > 3. Writing a paragraph. (Again failed as his imagination is quite limited and failed to make a story around a topic)
        >
        > I know the major failure is on my part. I need to learn a bit more. I'd be greatful if you can help me:
        >
        >
        > 1. To understand some intersting ways to teach him language
        >
        > 2. To have some material on english langague.
        >
        > 3. To have some sort of interesting test material his caliber time to time.
        >
        > 4. Some online useful llinks.
        >
        > 5. Some other suggestion for me as well.
        >
        > With Warm Regards,
        > Arun Mahajan
        >
        > ________________________________
        >
        > This e-mail message and its attachments are for the sole use of the intended recipients. It may contain proprietary, confidential, privileged information or other information subject to legal restrictions. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please do not read, copy, use or disclose this message or its attachments. Please notify the sender immediately and destroy all copies of this message and any attachments.
        > WARNING: This e-mail message including attachment(s), if any, is believed to be free of any virus. However, it is the responsibility of the recipient to ensure for absence of viruses. Aircel shall not be held responsible nor does it accept any liability for any damage arising in any way from its use.
        >





        --
        Sharla

        Life is full if you open your eyes:
        Take joy where you find it.



        --
        Sharla

        Life is full if you open your eyes:
        Take joy where you find it.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.