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Re: I've found DB's Seattle address in 1928!

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  • Keith
    Good work Cadia!
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 24, 2010
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      Good work Cadia!





      --- In aloha-donblanding@yahoogroups.com, "Cadia" <duchess@...> wrote:
      >
      > Today is a great day! I was downloading some PDF files from the Seattle Times and stumbled across an item that gave the address of DB and Earl Cohan (Challenger) when they were in Seattle from July to December 1928.
      >
      > It is 432 Belmont Avenue North -- now "East" -- and is about 3 blocks from the apartment I've lived in nearly 20 years. It's described as an "old brown house" which probably has been replaced by an apartment house by now. I'll walk by there on my way home from the library tonight and see what I can see.
      >
      > Yes! Hi-5's all around!
      >
      > ~~Cadia
      >
    • Cadia
      Hello, all ... Finally got my scanner back in operation about 4:30 a.m. Friday (long night!) and just in time. In Friday s mail came the photo of 432 Belmont
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 6, 2010
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        Hello, all ...

        Finally got my scanner back in operation about 4:30 a.m. Friday (long night!) and just in time. In Friday's mail came the photo of 432 Belmont Avenue North (now East) that I ordered from the King County Archives.

        The photo is dated 1937 but the house probably looks pretty much the same as it did in 1928 when DB and Earl Cohan (Challenger) lived there in 1928:

        <a HREF="http://myglassduchess.freeyellow.com/images9/432belmont.jpg"> 432 Belmont Ave N</a>

        According to the data sheets that came with the photo, the house was built in 1883 and torn down about 1960 to make way for a parking lot across the street from the Corona Apartments, built about that time. Occupying the corner now is a large apartment building called Belmont Court, built in 2000 and encompassing the lots where Nos. 424-432
        once stood. Next door now is No. 422, a brick apartment building that probably dates from before 1928.

        No. 432 was 2-1/2 stories high, with single-story porches on front and back. I can imagine DB sitting on that front porch (6 ft x 22 ft) and watching the sunset over the Olympic Mountains. Inside there were 6 rooms, 3 upstairs and 3 downstairs, plus a full basement. The overall floor plan measured 31 ft x 22 ft, excluding the porches.

        The exterior was clapboard, apparently a shade of brown that closely matches the brownish-pink brick apartment building across Republican St., which is still there. The white area under the eaves was a mix of Victorian "fishscale" and two geometric designs. Note the chevron design beneath the porch railing. The roof was shingled. Besides the porch at the back of the house (east side), there was a "vacated street" area and a 20 ft x 18 ft double garage shared with No. 428. I don't know if the garage was present prior to 1937.

        The data sheets include a small photo of the house as it appeared in 1952, which I will try to scan later. It shows more of the houses to the south and a single-story 7 ft x 17 ft "addition" on the north side of the house that might not have been there when the 1937 photo was taken.

        Sometime this coming week, if the weather cooperates, I plan to take photos of the intersection as it appears today. I also want to investigate the building at 1117 Harvard Avenue North (East) -- if it still exists! -- where DB and Earl had their first Seattle show in the fall of 1928.

        So, that's it for now. I guess you could call No. 432 DB's first mainland "vagabond's house" -- which seems appropriate since his book was published while he lived there.

        Enjoy!

        ~~Cadia
      • Bev Leinbach
        Looks like the dogwood tree on the side of the house is in bloom as well as the camellia in front of the porch. So this photo was probable taken in the late
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 6, 2010
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          Looks like the dogwood tree on the side of the house is in bloom as well as
          the camellia in front of the porch.

          So this photo was probable taken in the late winter or early spring time.



          Bev.

          _____

          From: aloha-donblanding@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:aloha-donblanding@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Cadia
          Sent: Saturday, March 06, 2010 1:39 PM
          To: aloha-donblanding@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [aloha-donblanding] Re: I've found DB's Seattle address in 1928!





          Hello, all ...

          Finally got my scanner back in operation about 4:30 a.m. Friday (long
          night!) and just in time. In Friday's mail came the photo of 432 Belmont
          Avenue North (now East) that I ordered from the King County Archives.

          The photo is dated 1937 but the house probably looks pretty much the same as
          it did in 1928 when DB and Earl Cohan (Challenger) lived there in 1928:

          <a HREF="http://myglassduche
          <http://myglassduchess.freeyellow.com/images9/432belmont.jpg>
          ss.freeyellow.com/images9/432belmont.jpg"> 432 Belmont Ave N</a>

          According to the data sheets that came with the photo, the house was built
          in 1883 and torn down about 1960 to make way for a parking lot across the
          street from the Corona Apartments, built about that time. Occupying the
          corner now is a large apartment building called Belmont Court, built in 2000
          and encompassing the lots where Nos. 424-432
          once stood. Next door now is No. 422, a brick apartment building that
          probably dates from before 1928.

          No. 432 was 2-1/2 stories high, with single-story porches on front and back.
          I can imagine DB sitting on that front porch (6 ft x 22 ft) and watching the
          sunset over the Olympic Mountains. Inside there were 6 rooms, 3 upstairs and
          3 downstairs, plus a full basement. The overall floor plan measured 31 ft x
          22 ft, excluding the porches.

          The exterior was clapboard, apparently a shade of brown that closely matches
          the brownish-pink brick apartment building across Republican St., which is
          still there. The white area under the eaves was a mix of Victorian
          "fishscale" and two geometric designs. Note the chevron design beneath the
          porch railing. The roof was shingled. Besides the porch at the back of the
          house (east side), there was a "vacated street" area and a 20 ft x 18 ft
          double garage shared with No. 428. I don't know if the garage was present
          prior to 1937.

          The data sheets include a small photo of the house as it appeared in 1952,
          which I will try to scan later. It shows more of the houses to the south and
          a single-story 7 ft x 17 ft "addition" on the north side of the house that
          might not have been there when the 1937 photo was taken.

          Sometime this coming week, if the weather cooperates, I plan to take photos
          of the intersection as it appears today. I also want to investigate the
          building at 1117 Harvard Avenue North (East) -- if it still exists! -- where
          DB and Earl had their first Seattle show in the fall of 1928.

          So, that's it for now. I guess you could call No. 432 DB's first mainland
          "vagabond's house" -- which seems appropriate since his book was published
          while he lived there.

          Enjoy!

          ~~Cadia





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Cadia
          Good eye, Bev! Dogwood and camellia were my first choices, too, although perhaps it s a rhody in front of the porch. The assessor s report is dated June 24,
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 6, 2010
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            Good eye, Bev!

            Dogwood and camellia were my first choices, too, although perhaps it's a rhody in front of the porch. The assessor's report is dated June 24, 1937, which is about when the photo would have been taken. Dogwood doesn't bloom here until very late May and more likely June. There's a huge one just down the street from my apartment, and I wait for it to flower every year.

            Camellias bloom all year long, but rhodies are gone by mid-June. The tree foliage also suggests that time frame. Believe me, the trees at that intersection yesterday weren't even thinking "green!"

            ~~Cadia
          • Bev Leinbach
            Doesn t look full enough for a Rhody. Bev. _____ From: aloha-donblanding@yahoogroups.com [mailto:aloha-donblanding@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Cadia Sent:
            Message 5 of 7 , Mar 6, 2010
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              Doesn't look full enough for a Rhody.



              Bev.

              _____

              From: aloha-donblanding@yahoogroups.com
              [mailto:aloha-donblanding@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Cadia
              Sent: Saturday, March 06, 2010 4:40 PM
              To: aloha-donblanding@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [aloha-donblanding] Re: I've found DB's Seattle address in 1928!





              Good eye, Bev!

              Dogwood and camellia were my first choices, too, although perhaps it's a
              rhody in front of the porch. The assessor's report is dated June 24, 1937,
              which is about when the photo would have been taken. Dogwood doesn't bloom
              here until very late May and more likely June. There's a huge one just down
              the street from my apartment, and I wait for it to flower every year.

              Camellias bloom all year long, but rhodies are gone by mid-June. The tree
              foliage also suggests that time frame. Believe me, the trees at that
              intersection yesterday weren't even thinking "green!"

              ~~Cadia





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Cadia
              Hello, all ... Here s a view of the house taken in February 1952; by that time it had been converted from a single-family dwelling to a rooming house:
              Message 6 of 7 , Mar 9, 2010
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                Hello, all ...

                Here's a view of the house taken in February 1952; by that time it had been converted from a single-family dwelling to a rooming house:

                http://myglassduchess.freeyellow.com/images9/432belmont4.jpg

                The clapboard exterior has been replaced by shingles and the decorative "fishscale" and geometric designs have given way to plain clapboard under the eaves. It appears that the chevron design below the porch railing is covered. Notice, also, that the dogwood and camellia are gone.

                This later view shows 2 of the houses to the south. (There were at least 3 houses and a small apartment building according to a 1917 Sanborn map.) Also visible is the single-story addition on the north side of the house, which may have been there in 1928 but not in 1883. I can't determine if the low building at left belongs to the house up the hill or is the double garage shared by Nos. 432 and 428.

                Today, the main entrance to the Belmont Court apartments (424 Belmont East) is just about where the "addition" was, though somewhat closer to the sidewalk. The front corner of the building is actually its parking garage; it has a balcony that remarkably suggests the original front porch of No. 432!

                Side story: In 1987, I did some freelance work for a condo homeowners association located about a block north of the Belmont/Republican intersection. Quite often I walked this very block from my old apartment about 8 blocks south. I'm rather glad the site was a parking lot by then; I would have been very upset to learn all these years later that I could have lived there!

                ~~Cadia
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