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Don Blanding film clip on YouTube

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  • keith2draw
    I have a treat for you guys. I discovered a 1934 color video of Don Blanding with sound a few years back and I had it converted to a digital file and included
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 1, 2007
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      I have a treat for you guys. I discovered a 1934 color video of Don Blanding with sound a few
      years back and I had it converted to a digital file and included it in my Blanding presentation
      last April in Kingfisher.

      I just uploaded the video to YouTube and I'm providing a link here:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l5A5irc8dWU

      Please watch th video and tell me what you think. It's quite weird to finally see Don "alive" and
      in the flesh. Maybe this will generate some conversation.

      Keith
    • Karen Cotter
      It opened for me but stopped halfway through. KittyKowKow ... From: keith2draw To: aloha-donblanding@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, February 01, 2007 6:51
      Message 2 of 10 , Feb 1, 2007
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        It opened for me but stopped halfway through. KittyKowKow

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: keith2draw
        To: aloha-donblanding@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, February 01, 2007 6:51 PM
        Subject: [aloha-donblanding] Re: Don Blanding film clip on YouTube


        Argh! The video is not accessable yet.

        Keith





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Allen
        I just logged on to the video. It played fine. Don was of course a bit older when he lived with us in the early 50 s but it was great to see and hear him
        Message 3 of 10 , Feb 1, 2007
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          I just logged on to the video. It played fine. Don was of course a bit older when he lived with us in the early 50's but it was great to see and hear him again. All you folks that can, hope you enjoy Mr. Pfeffer's collection. Allen Sawtelle

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: keith2draw
          To: aloha-donblanding@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, February 01, 2007 6:51 PM
          Subject: [aloha-donblanding] Re: Don Blanding film clip on YouTube


          Argh! The video is not accessable yet.

          Keith





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Cadia Los
          Keith, that s a neat find! On dial-up, the video hesitates about every 5 seconds, but I was finally able to get a complete run. Who is the woman? Of course,
          Message 4 of 10 , Feb 1, 2007
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            Keith, that's a neat find! On dial-up, the video hesitates about
            every 5 seconds, but I was finally able to get a complete run. Who is
            the woman?

            Of course, I have heard DB's voice before, but seeing him "live" just
            gives me goosebumps!

            Is this video related to any of the travelogues that DB made in the
            1930s? I know that 3 of the films have been transferred to VHS and
            are in the Bishop Museum's collection. The films are narrated by DB;
            not sure if he actually appears on screen. They run from 10 minutes
            to about 38 minutes.

            In 1934, DB was planning to return to Honolulu for Lei Day ... but
            cancelled the trip because he was "doing films in Hollywood."

            I wonder if there's any chance of obtaining copies of the
            travelogues ... for a price, of course.

            ~~C~~
          • Bev Leinbach
            Wow! His voice sound so familiar, like I have hear it often on the radio in my younger days. And to see him in person...what a great find. Mahalo ... From:
            Message 5 of 10 , Feb 1, 2007
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              Wow!

              His voice sound so familiar, like I have hear it often on the radio in my
              younger days. And to see him in person...what a great find.

              Mahalo


              -----Original Message-----
              From: aloha-donblanding@yahoogroups.com
              [mailto:aloha-donblanding@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of keith2draw
              Sent: Thursday, February 01, 2007 6:44 PM
              To: aloha-donblanding@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [aloha-donblanding] Don Blanding film clip on YouTube


              I have a treat for you guys. I discovered a 1934 color video of Don
              Blanding with sound a few
              years back and I had it converted to a digital file and included it in my
              Blanding presentation
              last April in Kingfisher.

              I just uploaded the video to YouTube and I'm providing a link here:

              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l5A5irc8dWU

              Please watch th video and tell me what you think. It's quite weird to
              finally see Don "alive" and
              in the flesh. Maybe this will generate some conversation.

              Keith






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • mauibandb@aol.com
              I hosted a showing of these films in late 80 s Ms Mossman the star in some of them attended. Desoto Brown provided and screened them. I don t remember Don
              Message 6 of 10 , Feb 1, 2007
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                I hosted a showing of these films in late 80's Ms Mossman the star in some
                of them attended. Desoto Brown provided and screened them. I don't remember
                Don being in them but I remember his voice over.

                aloha
                Tom


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • pgbusi@aol.com
                Fantastic Keith---like he is still alive and speaking with a marvelous voice. Did I miss who the lady is? Thanks Keith for finding this. Dean [Non-text
                Message 7 of 10 , Feb 2, 2007
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                  Fantastic Keith---like he is still alive and speaking with a marvelous
                  voice. Did I miss who the lady is?
                  Thanks Keith for finding this.
                  Dean


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • keith2draw
                  Here s a description of the movie that the film snipet is from: Song of the Islands, a Miller-Nagel Production, was a forty-minute drama made in 1934 and
                  Message 8 of 10 , Feb 2, 2007
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                    Here's a description of the movie that the film snipet is from:

                    Song of the Islands, a Miller-Nagel Production, was a forty-minute drama made in 1934
                    and screened in many mainland theatres and on cruise ships. Blanding wrote the
                    screenplay and provided narration, and the Hawaiian cast consisted of Sam Kapu, Pualani
                    Mokimana, James Kamakaiwi, and Joe Kamakau. Music was provided by Harry Owens and
                    his Royal Hawaiian Orchestra, Bob Cutter, the Hawaiian Girls Glee Club, Ray Kinney and his
                    Hawaiians, the Joe Kamakau Singers, and Minerva Patten.

                    As a steamer departs for the mainland, a woman asks Hawaiian resident Don Blanding to
                    explain the custom of throwing leis into the water. Blanding explains that its roots lay in a
                    story of Old Hawaii: Princess Pualani, whose name means "Flowers of Heaven," is an island
                    girl who loves Moku, a young native who is not of royal blood. Like all Hawaiians, Moku
                    and Pualani love the water. They spend their time together like happy children and Moku
                    makes a lei of shells for Pualani, a symbol of their eternal love. In those days, the
                    Hawaiians practiced the old crafts, including weaving, netting and carving cocoanuts. One
                    day, large canoes approach the island and Pualani's father, the chief of the village, greets a
                    prince traveling from a neighboring island. The prince, who is looking for a wife, and has
                    heard stories of Pualani's beauty, wants her for his bride. The chief accepts the prince's
                    gifts and tells his daughter that she must marry him. She does notwant to marry the prince
                    and leave her home, but her father insists that it is her duty. Even though Pualani knows
                    that she will one day be a queen, she still loves Moku. Though her heart is broken, Pualani
                    returns the lei to Moku. During a sumptuous wedding feast, traditional foods are served,
                    including fish and poi, which is made from Taro root and prepared by the men. The pig
                    brought by the prince has been wrapped in banana leaves and cooked in a pit for three
                    days. As Pualani dances the traditional Hula, Moku can no longer bear to watch the
                    ceremony and leaves. Later, he makes a special lei for her and gives it to her as she
                    departs in the prince's canoe. As the canoe goes further away from the island, Pualani
                    lovingly kisses the lei and places it in the water. For hours Moku sadly looks toward the
                    sea until the lei drifts onto the shore. Now knowing that Pualani still loves him, Moku
                    prays to the gods that, like the lei, Pualani will someday return to him. At the end of the
                    story, Blanding tells his companion that it explains the reason why tourists throw leis into
                    the water as they sail away from Hawaii, promising that someday they will return.

                    Keith
                  • Bev Leinbach
                    What a great story. I had never heard it before, did he make it up or was it a story told many times in the islands then? ... From:
                    Message 9 of 10 , Feb 2, 2007
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                      What a great story. I had never heard it before, did he make it up or was
                      it a story told many times in the islands then?


                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: aloha-donblanding@yahoogroups.com
                      [mailto:aloha-donblanding@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of keith2draw
                      Sent: Friday, February 02, 2007 5:58 PM
                      To: aloha-donblanding@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [aloha-donblanding] Re: Don Blanding film clip on YouTube


                      Here's a description of the movie that the film snipet is from:

                      Song of the Islands, a Miller-Nagel Production, was a forty-minute drama
                      made in 1934
                      and screened in many mainland theatres and on cruise ships. Blanding wrote
                      the
                      screenplay and provided narration, and the Hawaiian cast consisted of Sam
                      Kapu, Pualani
                      Mokimana, James Kamakaiwi, and Joe Kamakau. Music was provided by Harry
                      Owens and
                      his Royal Hawaiian Orchestra, Bob Cutter, the Hawaiian Girls Glee Club,
                      Ray Kinney and his
                      Hawaiians, the Joe Kamakau Singers, and Minerva Patten.

                      As a steamer departs for the mainland, a woman asks Hawaiian resident Don
                      Blanding to
                      explain the custom of throwing leis into the water. Blanding explains that
                      its roots lay in a
                      story of Old Hawaii: Princess Pualani, whose name means "Flowers of
                      Heaven," is an island
                      girl who loves Moku, a young native who is not of royal blood. Like all
                      Hawaiians, Moku
                      and Pualani love the water. They spend their time together like happy
                      children and Moku
                      makes a lei of shells for Pualani, a symbol of their eternal love. In
                      those days, the
                      Hawaiians practiced the old crafts, including weaving, netting and carving
                      cocoanuts. One
                      day, large canoes approach the island and Pualani's father, the chief of
                      the village, greets a
                      prince traveling from a neighboring island. The prince, who is looking for
                      a wife, and has
                      heard stories of Pualani's beauty, wants her for his bride. The chief
                      accepts the prince's
                      gifts and tells his daughter that she must marry him. She does notwant to
                      marry the prince
                      and leave her home, but her father insists that it is her duty. Even
                      though Pualani knows
                      that she will one day be a queen, she still loves Moku. Though her heart
                      is broken, Pualani
                      returns the lei to Moku. During a sumptuous wedding feast, traditional
                      foods are served,
                      including fish and poi, which is made from Taro root and prepared by the
                      men. The pig
                      brought by the prince has been wrapped in banana leaves and cooked in a
                      pit for three
                      days. As Pualani dances the traditional Hula, Moku can no longer bear to
                      watch the
                      ceremony and leaves. Later, he makes a special lei for her and gives it to
                      her as she
                      departs in the prince's canoe. As the canoe goes further away from the
                      island, Pualani
                      lovingly kisses the lei and places it in the water. For hours Moku sadly
                      looks toward the
                      sea until the lei drifts onto the shore. Now knowing that Pualani still
                      loves him, Moku
                      prays to the gods that, like the lei, Pualani will someday return to him.
                      At the end of the
                      story, Blanding tells his companion that it explains the reason why
                      tourists throw leis into
                      the water as they sail away from Hawaii, promising that someday they will
                      return.

                      Keith






                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • pgbusi@aol.com
                      Beautiful story Keith...thanks for sharing it. Dean [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      Message 10 of 10 , Feb 3, 2007
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                        Beautiful story Keith...thanks for sharing it.
                        Dean


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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