Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Moonstone ring

Expand Messages
  • tjmarkle@earthlink.net
    Well, I don t think this is DB s ring. It is a size 41/2 which would just fit my pinkie finger. It came out of Maryland at an estate sale. Well, got some
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 11, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      Well, I don't think this is DB's ring. It is a size 41/2 which would just fit my pinkie finger. It came out of Maryland at an estate sale. Well, got some excitement going anyway. tj
    • keith2draw
      Hi all. We just returned back from a three-week jaunt to South Africa, and I see you have an interesting thread going. In December I received the following
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 13, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi all. We just returned back from a three-week jaunt to South
        Africa, and I see you have an interesting thread going.

        In December I received the following email:


        My name is Judi (Nottleson) Woodard. Grace Nottleson Callahan was
        my father's sister, and close friend to Edythe H.G. We had my Aunt
        Grace, Edythe, and Don Blanding in our home one Christmas when I was
        a child. I remember him being a large, tall man. Edythe was also
        tall and very striking. Edythe and my Aunt shared Edythe's home in
        their latter days.

        Edythe died first and left her estate to my Aunt. When my Aunt died,
        my twin brother and I inherited her estate, along with what Edythe
        had left her. All of the jewelry was left to me--the rest was split
        50/50 with my brother. Among the jewelry was a moon stone ring
        (very beautiful and unique--one of a kind I'm told) that Don Blanding
        had specially designed for Edythe. With the ring is a tiny little
        note written by Don Blanding to Edythe. I have the ring and note in
        a safety deposit box for safe keeping.

        My Aunt shard with me when I became an adult that Edythe and Don
        Blanding were more than just working partners. They were
        romantically involved. Don adored her and among many gifts he gave
        her was this ring. It's set in 18 kt gold with gorgeous detailing
        around the large, oval shaped moon stone (from Hawaii). I've had
        several jewelers look at it and they all tell me it's priceless and
        probably one of a kind. I had a photo of Don Blanding wearing one
        that matched it, and also a photo of Edythe wearing the one I now
        have. Many of Don Blanding's things were sold to a gentleman who
        wanted to place them into a Don Blanding museum in Oklahoma (I can't
        remember the city).

        I have one box of his things that I kept, but it's stored somewhere
        in my garage. It would be a monumental task to find the box, but
        perhaps one day my husband and I will spend some time looking for
        it. I really regret getting rid of all the things we had. I had the
        shirts he wore in Hawaii, romantic letters he wrote to Edythe, and
        tons of photos--some of him with movie stars, some of him with
        Edythe, and lots of photos of Don Blanding himself.


        We still don't know where Don's moonstone ring is, but at least we
        have more to go on now....Keith
      • Karen Cotter
        This is really interesting, Keith! My mind boggles at the tiny details that reveal themselves...this has been a fruitful last couple of months for you and
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 13, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          This is really interesting, Keith! My mind boggles at the tiny details
          that reveal themselves...this has been a fruitful last couple of months for
          you and tj! I do follow all this stuff; have nothing to add myself as I
          told tj yesterday; I've been involved in a study of Kit Carson/John
          Fremont - their long association and all the interesting characters they
          knew and/or hired to go along on their explorations and expeditions as
          Indian fighters, artists, navigators, fellow adventurers, those with other
          knowledge to help the various expeditions...and so on. I'm finding that
          many of these men had homes scattered all about the West and many near my
          home here and even more astonishing, ranches and adobes all around my home
          in the mountains north of here.
          To my great dismay I read about an adobe built by one of Kit's closest
          friends and a worthy member of many of the expeditions, who owned
          surrounding ranchland only a short hop down the hills in the Frazier Park
          area from my other house. I immediately set out to find it. The local
          little Ridge Route historical society said there was even a remnant of the
          original adobe ranch house from around 1850 and after a good deal of
          research I found the property had just been purchased by someone with NO
          knowledge of local history, California history and zero interest in same who
          had, only 2 weeks before, brought in a bulldozer and leveled what was left
          of the adobe ranch house! I was ripping my hair out.

          Even the Historical Society had no foreknowledge and they were all in a
          age - but that's the history of California. Not much you can do about
          private property if steps aren't taken legally to declare something a
          historical treasure and that is tough to do with the prevailing philosophy
          about the primacy of "private property". I digress as usual.

          At any rate, I will be looking forward to reading your book someday and I
          can see you are going to have a lot of tidbits not revealed on the Blanding
          website, which is good thinking. Don't want to show your hand on all the
          goodies, otherwise there will be no surprises in the book! Nice of you to
          answer Pam...I told tj that reading her letter took me back to my
          "estate-saleing" days in the early '70s when my sister and I went out early
          every Saturday morning to all the estate sales in the Hollywood Hills. In
          those days, the little old ladies from the roaring '20s were dying like
          flies and the Hollywood Hills have always been full of eccentrics (just like
          in the Blanding days) and their houses were chock-a-block with interesting
          things. We'd be joined by many other estate sale addicts, all with
          cardboard boxes under our arms and when the doors were opened we were like
          ants at a picnic. My sister and I agreed that nothing has ever stirred our
          adrenaline like those estate sales up until eBay! :o)

          So many people who were selling off their old family member's things had NO
          idea of the worth of much of it and were all sweet and naive like
          Pam....like many of the eBay sellers say, "I am not a doll person"....or
          whatever, and offer some item that's worth hundreds for $9.99. So much the
          better for us collectors but sad that people don't take the time to do their
          homework before tossing old items like Pam did.

          NOTHING escapes in my family as I have told you we are generations of
          collectors and know fine things, either by value or by history but I could
          type pages about friends of mine who have tossed really valuable things in
          the trash barrels or given them away to charities....all through total
          ignorance and they get REALLY annoyed when you remonstrate with them. I
          suppose it's due to laziness as who doesn't want money or the realization of
          the intrinsic value of family things? At any rate, what sadness I feel at
          what was lost via Pam but also joy at knowing she has things that are going
          to bring a lot of pleasure to you, tj and the others who are genuinely
          working on this interesting trail.

          Well, shut up Karen....breakfast is in order - it's raining here and I've
          got a little fire in the fireplace and tons of work to do. Gotta get with
          the program! Hugs to the little sweetie , Karen

          ----- Original Message ----- e
          From: "keith2draw" <keith2draw@...>
          To: <aloha-donblanding@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Sunday, April 13, 2003 6:07 AM
          Subject: [aloha-donblanding] Moonstone rings


          > Hi all. We just returned back from a three-week jaunt to South
          > Africa, and I see you have an interesting thread going.
          >
          > In December I received the following email:
          >
          >
          > My name is Judi (Nottleson) Woodard. Grace Nottleson Callahan was
          > my father's sister, and close friend to Edythe H.G. We had my Aunt
          > Grace, Edythe, and Don Blanding in our home one Christmas when I was
          > a child. I remember him being a large, tall man. Edythe was also
          > tall and very striking. Edythe and my Aunt shared Edythe's home in
          > their latter days.
          >
          > Edythe died first and left her estate to my Aunt. When my Aunt died,
          > my twin brother and I inherited her estate, along with what Edythe
          > had left her. All of the jewelry was left to me--the rest was split
          > 50/50 with my brother. Among the jewelry was a moon stone ring
          > (very beautiful and unique--one of a kind I'm told) that Don Blanding
          > had specially designed for Edythe. With the ring is a tiny little
          > note written by Don Blanding to Edythe. I have the ring and note in
          > a safety deposit box for safe keeping.
          >
          > My Aunt shard with me when I became an adult that Edythe and Don
          > Blanding were more than just working partners. They were
          > romantically involved. Don adored her and among many gifts he gave
          > her was this ring. It's set in 18 kt gold with gorgeous detailing
          > around the large, oval shaped moon stone (from Hawaii). I've had
          > several jewelers look at it and they all tell me it's priceless and
          > probably one of a kind. I had a photo of Don Blanding wearing one
          > that matched it, and also a photo of Edythe wearing the one I now
          > have. Many of Don Blanding's things were sold to a gentleman who
          > wanted to place them into a Don Blanding museum in Oklahoma (I can't
          > remember the city).
          >
          > I have one box of his things that I kept, but it's stored somewhere
          > in my garage. It would be a monumental task to find the box, but
          > perhaps one day my husband and I will spend some time looking for
          > it. I really regret getting rid of all the things we had. I had the
          > shirts he wore in Hawaii, romantic letters he wrote to Edythe, and
          > tons of photos--some of him with movie stars, some of him with
          > Edythe, and lots of photos of Don Blanding himself.
          >
          >
          > We still don't know where Don's moonstone ring is, but at least we
          > have more to go on now....Keith
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > To Post a message, send it to: aloha-donblanding@...
          >
          > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
          aloha-donblanding-unsubscribe@...
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
          >
        • Cadia Los
          Karen.... From her note, Pam (Jeanne Wright s great-grandaughter) seems to have a great appreciation for the items handed down to her and wants to learn more.
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 13, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            Karen....

            From her note, Pam (Jeanne Wright's great-grandaughter) seems to have
            a great appreciation for the items handed down to her and wants to
            learn more. You refer, I think, to Judi, a niece of Grace Callahan,
            whose family sold or donated many Blanding artifacts to the Museum of
            the Great Plains in Lawton, Oklahoma. For that, we can all be
            grateful!

            Of course, as we know, DB himself gave away many of his belongings as
            he vagabonded through life. In a way, I'm glad he did; otherwise
            everything might have ended up in a museum vault to which we would
            not have access -- or the joy of the treasure hunt in which we now
            find ourselves.

            I share your dismay at the loss of the adobe dwelling. Perhaps only
            a tiny remnant of California's history, but precious nonetheless.

            ~~Cadia
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.