Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: "Leeteg, the Legend"

Expand Messages
  • tamsui1984
    ... I ... of ... OK Keith. We ll hold off discussing Michener until you ve read that chapter on Edgar Leeteg. (OOPs I wrote Leetag before.) He was a
    Message 1 of 13 , Dec 11, 2001
      > I have read a number of Michener's books, including 'Hawaii' - but
      I
      > have not read 'Rascals...' - I'll have to add it to my reading list.

      > At the moment I'm re-reading The Lord of the Rings in anticipation
      of
      > the movie. The Tolkien stories were a great source of escapism in my
      > high school days, and I'm finding it very nostalgic to revisit
      >middle earth.
      > Keith


      OK Keith. We'll hold off discussing Michener until you've read
      that chapter on Edgar Leeteg. (OOPs I wrote "Leetag" before.)
      He was a painter in the tropics, of course.

      It looks like Tolkien is going to be very hot for months. One of
      my hobbies it doing novel study with highschool and college students.
      I'm in the diffult position of having three requests to work with
      students on LORD OF THE RINGS, a trilogy I haven't read. So I
      purchased Lin Carter's book "TOLKIEN: A Look Behind the Lord of
      the Rings" (1969). I'm two thirds through Carter and I have to
      decide by the New Year if I want to tackle the novels or beg off.

      Merry Christmas to everyone on the Group.
      Ron Jack in Canada
    • luahiniwai
      Hello all, The dreaded wekeula from ebay has joined the fray. Alas, someone else has that handle on Yahoo, so I had to choose another Hawaiian name for this
      Message 2 of 13 , Dec 11, 2001
        Hello all,
        The dreaded "wekeula" from ebay has joined the fray. Alas, someone
        else has that handle on Yahoo, so I had to choose another Hawaiian
        name for this account. Oh well, it keeps it all interesting. Just
        wanted to throw my 2 cents in.

        I think that DB was more original than we give him credit for with
        his wood block prints and drawings. There really do not seem to have
        been many others doing similar work (although Huq Luquiens and
        Emerson come to mind). I think that he really captured the essence
        of the spirit of the islands in his prints and we can only guess at
        the impact that those images have had on motivating people to come to
        the islands to see it all for themselves. I also agree with Keith
        though, that it would have been great to see what he would have done
        had he focused less on poetry and the related prints and more on
        painting or even plain artistic print making.

        Much Aloha to all and Happy Holidays, Michael

        ps, I have a rather huge collection of his stuff so if anyone ever
        needs info in his pottery or books or whatever feel free to email
        me. . .


        --- In aloha-donblanding@y..., "keith2draw" <keith2draw@a...> wrote:
        > Ron
        >
        > I enjoyed reading your comments, and agree with you. I think Don
        was
        > heavily influenced by his artist friends in 1920s Hawaii (Frank N.
        > Moore, Howard H. Hitchcock & Kimo Wilder)...but his style never
        > really evolved very far from his commercial art roots.
        >
        > I have read a number of Michener's books, including 'Hawaii' - but
        I
        > have not read 'Rascals...' - I'll have to add it to my reading list.
        >
        > At the moment I'm re-reading The Lord of the Rings in anticipation
        of
        > the movie. The Tolkien stories were a great source of escapism in
        my
        > high school days, and I'm finding it very nostalgic to revisit
        middle
        > earth. I wonder if DB ever read the Hobbit?...probably not his cup
        of
        > tea.
        >
        > Keith
      • keith2draw
        Ron, I ve read Lin Carter s book...a long time ago, and seem to remember it being well written and insightful. But there s nothing like the real thing and I
        Message 3 of 13 , Dec 11, 2001
          Ron,

          I've read Lin Carter's book...a long time ago, and seem to remember
          it being well written and insightful. But there's nothing like the
          real thing and I would highly recommend you read the trilogy...you
          won't regret it.

          Keith
        • keith2draw
          We better switch back to Blanding topics, otherwise Cadia will scold us Welcome Michael! I agree with you that Blanding s illustration was very
          Message 4 of 13 , Dec 11, 2001
            We better switch back to Blanding topics, otherwise Cadia will scold
            us <smile>

            Welcome Michael!

            I agree with you that Blanding's illustration was very original...but
            I was refering to his earlier paintings, which were mainly fish and
            undersea panels and for the most part catered to tourists. I think
            once he had the success of Vagabond's House he was allowed to
            experiment more with his illustrative technique and it really took
            off. Blanding was good friends with several engravers in Honolulu,
            including John Poole, John Kelly and Juliette May Fraser...and I
            think he learned some of his technique (and eye for detail) from
            these artists. DBs adwork for the newspapers and the Charles R.
            Frazier advertising company was also good training for his later
            black & white work. Of course he also learned some of his technique
            from Chin Chong the candlemaker...as described in TODAY IS HERE.



            I'd be interested in obtaining an inventory list of your collection
            if you were willing to send it to me via private email.

            Keith
          • luahiniwai
            Keith, I had forgotten about Horatio Nelson Poole (more known for his Calif. paintings and hawaii paintings, but also quite an engraver) and John Poole, but
            Message 5 of 13 , Dec 11, 2001
              Keith,
              I had forgotten about Horatio Nelson Poole (more known for his Calif.
              paintings and hawaii paintings, but also quite an engraver) and John
              Poole, but they did some great work during that period. A friend of
              mine handled a huge lot of both brother's etchings a few years back
              and they were really incredible and now that you mention it I can see
              the influence on DB. Point well taken on the earlier stuff, but then
              again, there were a lot of "starving" artists working on the tourist
              trade in those days and even Hitchcock and other well known artists
              painted a lot for the trade.

              Anyway, hope all of you find a bit of blanding in your stockings this
              year--I am holding out for an orange 17 inch chop plate in coral reef
              <smile>

              aloha, michael


              --- In aloha-donblanding@y..., "keith2draw" <keith2draw@a...> wrote:
              > We better switch back to Blanding topics, otherwise Cadia will
              scold
              > us <smile>
              >
              > Welcome Michael!
              >
              > I agree with you that Blanding's illustration was very
              original...but
              > I was refering to his earlier paintings, which were mainly fish and
              > undersea panels and for the most part catered to tourists. I think
              > once he had the success of Vagabond's House he was allowed to
              > experiment more with his illustrative technique and it really took
              > off. Blanding was good friends with several engravers in Honolulu,
              > including John Poole, John Kelly and Juliette May Fraser...and I
              > think he learned some of his technique (and eye for detail) from
              > these artists. DBs adwork for the newspapers and the Charles R.
              > Frazier advertising company was also good training for his later
              > black & white work. Of course he also learned some of his technique
              > from Chin Chong the candlemaker...as described in TODAY IS HERE.
              >
              >
              >
              > I'd be interested in obtaining an inventory list of your collection
              > if you were willing to send it to me via private email.
              >
              > Keith
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.