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[aloha-donblanding] Blanding/Joan Crawford connection

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  • TikiRoom18@aol.com
    Aloha Everybody I was reading a biography of Joan Crawford last night and I came across what MAY be a roundabout connection to DB. Joan Crawford was born in
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 30, 2000
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      Aloha Everybody

      I was reading a biography of Joan Crawford last night and I came across
      what MAY be a roundabout connection to DB. Joan Crawford was born in either
      1904 or 1908 ,depending on who you choose to believe, in or near San Antonio,
      Texas. Around the time she was six her mother married a second husband and
      moved to live with him in (ready?...) Lawton, Oklahoma. This new stepfather
      of Joan's was the operator of the local vaudeville theatre and, according to
      this book, each day after school Billie Cassin (Her name back then...) "ran
      to the theatre and stood in the wings, watching the comics and dancers
      perform". Apparently she was quite the theatre bug, and saw her first motion
      pictures in Lawton as well.
      At age eleven her family then moved on to Kansas City and her story moves
      on. The Internet Movie database (www.imdb.com) ,which is usually pretty
      reliable, places her birth at March 23, 1904. This said, this would place
      Joan in Lawton from 1910-1915. This begs the question... was Don in Lawton
      then? What makes this question all the more interesting is that Don dedicates
      a poem in "Memory Room" to her, "The Little Girl Across The Street". (Don't
      just glance over it, its a poem wotth reading...)

      "She was just the little girl who lived across the street;
      All legs and curls and great big eyes, and restless dancing feet;
      As vivid as a hummingbird, as bright and swift and gay;
      A child who played at make-believe throughout the livelong day
      With tattered old lace curtains and a battered feather fan
      She swept and preened, an "actress" with a grubby snub-nosed clan
      Of neighbor kids for audience enchanted with the play
      A prairie Bernhardt for awhile. And then she went away
      We missed her on the little street, her laughter and her fun
      Untill the dull years blurred her name as years have ever done

      A great premiere in Hollywood. . . the lights, the crowds, the cars,
      The frenzied noise of greeting to the famous movie stars,
      The jewels, the lace, the ermine coats, the ballyhoo and cries,
      The peacock women's promenade, the bright mascaraed eyes....
      The swift excited whisper as the limousine draws near,
      "Oh, look! It's Joan. It's Joan. It's Joan!" On every side I hear
      The chatter, gossip, envy. sighs, conjecture, wonder,praise,
      As memory races quickly back to early prairie days.
      The little girl across the street. . . the funny child I knew
      Who dared to dream her splendid dreams. . . and make her dreams come true.
      ```````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````
      NEWSFLASH!!!! NEWSFLASH!!!!! NEWSFLASH!!!!!
      Well, in the course of writing this post, I have answered my own question.
      I had thought about just deleting this post, but I figured somebody else
      MIGHT be interested in reading my discovery... I can hope anyway....
      I pulled out another Crawford Bio and looked in the index.. Lo and Behold!
      a direct reference to Don Blanding! This is in a book called "Joan Crawford,
      a biography by Bob Thomas" by, of course, Bob Thomas... on page 14 of the
      paperback edition, this is stated:
      "One day when Billie was six, she cut her foot. She had grown bored with her
      piano lessons and decided to play on the front lawn. She leaped off the porch
      and landed on the jagged piece of a bottle. The glass ripped through her
      tendon and artery, and the pain was so acute that she lost consciousness. Don
      Blanding, the boy across the street, was returning to his house for a package
      he had forgotten and discovered the small figure on the lawn. He carried her
      into the house and called the doctor."

      On page 16 of this book we read an aftermath of sorts....

      " The Lawton years exerted a profound influence over Joan Crawford. She never
      escaped the guilt that she alone may have caused the family's downfall by her
      discovery in the cellar. (Stepfather was a gold smuggler, Joan came across
      his loot in the cellar...). Fearful remembrances returned to her in later
      years: An unexpected surge of wind recalled the terror of waiting underground
      for an Oklahoma cyclone to pass over. During a dance for "Our Blushing
      Brides" she fell to the floor in excruciating pain, the same she had
      experienced after she had leapt off the porch in Lawton......
      Don Blanding, the Lawton boy who summoned a doctor when Billie Cassin
      slashed her foot, became a popular versifier, and he wrote of his onetime
      neighbor:

      She was just the little girl who lived across the street;
      All legs and curls and great big eyes, and restless dancing feet;
      As vivid as a hummingbird, as bright and swift and gay;
      A child who played at make-believe"

      I guess that Don's association with celebrity came very early on.. This
      episode with Joan Crawford came about when Don was about 16 years of age or
      so. Anyone else have any insights into this? Do you know if they ever met
      again? This poem sort of paints Don as an onlooker and not a participant in
      Joan's later years...
      I'd appreciate comments and further information on this interesting
      episode in Don's life...
      Am I the only person in the Western world NOT watching the Super-bowl????

      Aloha
      Larry
    • Bill McMurray
      Nay, not so friend Larry, Here I am at my post! This is a terrific find you just told you just told us about. I love it. Bill Also to Cadia, I really enjoyed
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 30, 2000
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        Nay, not so friend Larry,
        Here I am at my post!
        This is a terrific find you just told you just told us about. I love it.
        Bill

        Also to Cadia,

        I really enjoyed your candid story about you and Dave Ballard. That whole
        posting was most enjoyable. Thank you for sharing it with us.

        One point I would like to make , however, is that Paul Reid's show was on
        the air from 6:00PM till 11:00 PM, Monday to Friday. His "Poet's Gold"
        segment, which he did not use every night, would usually be inserted
        somewhere between 9:30 and 10:30.
        His show had the highest ratings in the area in that time slot so I don't
        think it was a question of filling dead air time. Certainly, if there was
        another program on the air now that could compare to his, I could sell my
        TV.

        Bill

        ----------
        > From: TikiRoom18@...
        > To: aloha-donblanding@egroups.com
        > Subject: [aloha-donblanding] Blanding/Joan Crawford connection
        > Date: Sunday, January 30, 2000 7:48 PM
        >
        > Aloha Everybody
        >
        > I was reading a biography of Joan Crawford last night and I came
        across
        > what MAY be a roundabout connection to DB. Joan Crawford was born in
        either
        > 1904 or 1908 ,depending on who you choose to believe, in or near San
        Antonio,
        > Texas. Around the time she was six her mother married a second husband
        and
        > moved to live with him in (ready?...) Lawton, Oklahoma. This new
        stepfather
        > of Joan's was the operator of the local vaudeville theatre and, according
        to
        > this book, each day after school Billie Cassin (Her name back then...)
        "ran
        > to the theatre and stood in the wings, watching the comics and dancers
        > perform". Apparently she was quite the theatre bug, and saw her first
        motion
        > pictures in Lawton as well.
        > At age eleven her family then moved on to Kansas City and her story
        moves
        > on. The Internet Movie database (www.imdb.com) ,which is usually pretty
        > reliable, places her birth at March 23, 1904. This said, this would
        place
        > Joan in Lawton from 1910-1915. This begs the question... was Don in
        Lawton
        > then? What makes this question all the more interesting is that Don
        dedicates
        > a poem in "Memory Room" to her, "The Little Girl Across The Street".
        (Don't
        > just glance over it, its a poem wotth reading...)
        >
        > "She was just the little girl who lived across the street;
        > All legs and curls and great big eyes, and restless dancing feet;
        > As vivid as a hummingbird, as bright and swift and gay;
        > A child who played at make-believe throughout the livelong day
        > With tattered old lace curtains and a battered feather fan
        > She swept and preened, an "actress" with a grubby snub-nosed clan
        > Of neighbor kids for audience enchanted with the play
        > A prairie Bernhardt for awhile. And then she went away
        > We missed her on the little street, her laughter and her fun
        > Untill the dull years blurred her name as years have ever done
        >
        > A great premiere in Hollywood. . . the lights, the crowds, the cars,
        > The frenzied noise of greeting to the famous movie stars,
        > The jewels, the lace, the ermine coats, the ballyhoo and cries,
        > The peacock women's promenade, the bright mascaraed eyes....
        > The swift excited whisper as the limousine draws near,
        > "Oh, look! It's Joan. It's Joan. It's Joan!" On every side I hear
        > The chatter, gossip, envy. sighs, conjecture, wonder,praise,
        > As memory races quickly back to early prairie days.
        > The little girl across the street. . . the funny child I knew
        > Who dared to dream her splendid dreams. . . and make her dreams come
        true.
        > ```````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````
        > NEWSFLASH!!!! NEWSFLASH!!!!! NEWSFLASH!!!!!
        > Well, in the course of writing this post, I have answered my own
        question.
        > I had thought about just deleting this post, but I figured somebody else
        > MIGHT be interested in reading my discovery... I can hope anyway....
        > I pulled out another Crawford Bio and looked in the index.. Lo and
        Behold!
        > a direct reference to Don Blanding! This is in a book called "Joan
        Crawford,
        > a biography by Bob Thomas" by, of course, Bob Thomas... on page 14 of the

        > paperback edition, this is stated:
        > "One day when Billie was six, she cut her foot. She had grown bored with
        her
        > piano lessons and decided to play on the front lawn. She leaped off the
        porch
        > and landed on the jagged piece of a bottle. The glass ripped through her
        > tendon and artery, and the pain was so acute that she lost consciousness.
        Don
        > Blanding, the boy across the street, was returning to his house for a
        package
        > he had forgotten and discovered the small figure on the lawn. He carried
        her
        > into the house and called the doctor."
        >
        > On page 16 of this book we read an aftermath of sorts....
        >
        > " The Lawton years exerted a profound influence over Joan Crawford. She
        never
        > escaped the guilt that she alone may have caused the family's downfall by
        her
        > discovery in the cellar. (Stepfather was a gold smuggler, Joan came
        across
        > his loot in the cellar...). Fearful remembrances returned to her in later

        > years: An unexpected surge of wind recalled the terror of waiting
        underground
        > for an Oklahoma cyclone to pass over. During a dance for "Our Blushing
        > Brides" she fell to the floor in excruciating pain, the same she had
        > experienced after she had leapt off the porch in Lawton......
        > Don Blanding, the Lawton boy who summoned a doctor when Billie Cassin
        > slashed her foot, became a popular versifier, and he wrote of his onetime

        > neighbor:
        >
        > She was just the little girl who lived across the street;
        > All legs and curls and great big eyes, and restless dancing feet;
        > As vivid as a hummingbird, as bright and swift and gay;
        > A child who played at make-believe"
        >
        > I guess that Don's association with celebrity came very early on..
        This
        > episode with Joan Crawford came about when Don was about 16 years of age
        or
        > so. Anyone else have any insights into this? Do you know if they ever
        met
        > again? This poem sort of paints Don as an onlooker and not a participant
        in
        > Joan's later years...
        > I'd appreciate comments and further information on this interesting
        > episode in Don's life...
        > Am I the only person in the Western world NOT watching the
        Super-bowl????
        >
        > Aloha
        > Larry
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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        aloha-donblanding-unsubscribe@...
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        >
      • Beverly Leinbach
        Reply on Joan Crawford, I have a copy of two articles that I would like to share from. 1. Aloha/92...by Charles Lovell Another interesting story about
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 30, 2000
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          Reply on Joan Crawford,

          I have a copy of two articles that I would like to share from.

          1. Aloha/92...by Charles Lovell
          "Another interesting story about Blanding's life concerns an
          experience he had when a student in Lawton, A young neighbor girl named
          Lucille Le Sueur had received a severe cut on her foot, and Blanding applied
          a tourniquet to stop the bleeding. Many years later in Hollywood, the
          "little girl from across the street" reintroduced herself to Blanding. By
          that time she was well known as actress Joan Crawford, and she thanked
          Blanding publicly for saving her life.

          2. Dreams (feb.23,82)...by Terence Barrow
          "Life in Lawton was colorful and rarely dull. One particular day
          Blanding jumped into a pool to save a neighbor's daughter from
          drowning. that girl became famous later as film star Joan Crawford and was
          a lifetime friend of Blandings."

          What should we belive now?
          Bev.


          From: TikiRoom18@...
          Reply-To: aloha-donblanding@egroups.com
          To: aloha-donblanding@egroups.com
          Subject: [aloha-donblanding] Blanding/Joan Crawford connection
          Date: Sun, 30 Jan 2000 19:48:01 EST


          Aloha Everybody

          I was reading a biography of Joan Crawford last night and I came across
          what MAY be a roundabout connection to DB. Joan Crawford was born in either
          1904 or 1908 ,depending on who you choose to believe, in or near San
          Antonio,
          Texas. Around the time she was six her mother married a second husband and
          moved to live with him in (ready?...) Lawton, Oklahoma. This new stepfather
          of Joan's was the operator of the local vaudeville theatre and, according to
          this book, each day after school Billie Cassin (Her name back then...)
          "ran
          to the theatre and stood in the wings, watching the comics and dancers
          perform". Apparently she was quite the theatre bug, and saw her first
          motion
          pictures in Lawton as well.
          At age eleven her family then moved on to Kansas City and her story
          moves
          on. The Internet Movie database (www.imdb.com) ,which is usually pretty
          reliable, places her birth at March 23, 1904. This said, this would place
          Joan in Lawton from 1910-1915. This begs the question... was Don in Lawton
          then? What makes this question all the more interesting is that Don
          dedicates
          a poem in "Memory Room" to her, "The Little Girl Across The Street". (Don't
          just glance over it, its a poem worth reading...)

          "She was just the little girl who lived across the street;
          All legs and curls and great big eyes, and restless dancing feet;
          As vivid as a hummingbird, as bright and swift and gay;
          A child who played at make-believe throughout the livelong day
          With tattered old lace curtains and a battered feather fan
          She swept and preened, an "actress" with a grubby snub-nosed clan
          Of neighbor kids for audience enchanted with the play
          A prairie Bernhardt for awhile. And then she went away
          We missed her on the little street, her laughter and her fun
          Until the dull years blurred her name as years have ever done

          A great premiere in Hollywood. . . the lights, the crowds, the cars,
          The frenzied noise of greeting to the famous movie stars,
          The jewels, the lace, the ermine coats, the ballyhoo and cries,
          The peacock women's promenade, the bright mascaraed eyes....
          The swift excited whisper as the limousine draws near,
          "Oh, look! It's Joan. It's Joan. It's Joan!" On every side I hear
          The chatter, gossip, envy. sighs, conjecture, wonder,praise,
          As memory races quickly back to early prairie days.
          The little girl across the street. . . the funny child I knew
          Who dared to dream her splendid dreams. . . and make her dreams come true.
          ```````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````
          NEWSFLASH!!!! NEWSFLASH!!!!! NEWSFLASH!!!!!
          Well, in the course of writing this post, I have answered my own
          question.
          I had thought about just deleting this post, but I figured somebody else
          MIGHT be interested in reading my discovery... I can hope anyway....
          I pulled out another Crawford Bio and looked in the index.. Lo and
          Behold!
          a direct reference to Don Blanding! This is in a book called "Joan
          Crawford,
          a biography by Bob Thomas" by, of course, Bob Thomas... on page 14 of the
          paperback edition, this is stated:
          "One day when Billie was six, she cut her foot. She had grown bored with her
          piano lessons and decided to play on the front lawn. She leaped off the
          porch
          and landed on the jagged piece of a bottle. The glass ripped through her
          tendon and artery, and the pain was so acute that she lost consciousness.
          Don
          Blanding, the boy across the street, was returning to his house for a
          package
          he had forgotten and discovered the small figure on the lawn. He carried her
          into the house and called the doctor."

          On page 16 of this book we read an aftermath of sorts....

          " The Lawton years exerted a profound influence over Joan Crawford. She
          never
          escaped the guilt that she alone may have caused the family's downfall by
          her
          discovery in the cellar. (Stepfather was a gold smuggler, Joan came across
          his loot in the cellar...). Fearful remembrances returned to her in later
          years: An unexpected surge of wind recalled the terror of waiting
          underground
          for an Oklahoma cyclone to pass over. During a dance for "Our Blushing
          Brides" she fell to the floor in excruciating pain, the same she had
          experienced after she had leapt off the porch in Lawton......
          Don Blanding, the Lawton boy who summoned a doctor when Billie Cassin
          slashed her foot, became a popular versifier, and he wrote of his onetime
          neighbor:

          She was just the little girl who lived across the street;
          All legs and curls and great big eyes, and restless dancing feet;
          As vivid as a hummingbird, as bright and swift and gay;
          A child who played at make-believe"

          I guess that Don's association with celebrity came very early on.. This
          episode with Joan Crawford came about when Don was about 16 years of age or
          so. Anyone else have any insights into this? Do you know if they ever met
          again? This poem sort of paints Don as an onlooker and not a participant in
          Joan's later years...
          I'd appreciate comments and further information on this interesting
          episode in Don's life...
          Am I the only person in the Western world NOT watching the
          Super-bowl????

          Aloha
          Larry




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        • TikiRoom18@aol.com
          In a message dated 00-01-30 22:41:03 EST, you write: I guess we can believe that the only two people who truly know the truth
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 30, 2000
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            In a message dated 00-01-30 22:41:03 EST, you write:

            << What should we belive now? >>


            I guess we can believe that the only two people who truly know the truth
            are unavailable for comment. . .


            Aloha
            larry
          • Keith Emmons
            Beverly and all, Charles Lovell s version is the correct one, not Terrence Barrow s. She was rescued by Blanding after jumping off her porch and severely
            Message 5 of 7 , Jan 30, 2000
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              Beverly and all,

              Charles Lovell's version is the correct one, not Terrence Barrow's. She
              was 'rescued' by Blanding after jumping off her porch and severely
              cutting her foot. She confirms this in her own book A PORTRAIT OF JOAN,
              which she co-wrote with Jane Kesner Ardmore in 1962. She says Donald
              was a senior in high school, which dates the accident to 1912. She also
              says she was six at the time, but we don't really know for certain,
              because she often lied about her true year of birth (at varying times
              1904, 1906 or 1908) but it seems she was being candid in this book, so
              maybe she was really six in 1912.

              Other books about Joan Crawford: the one refered to earlier, written by
              Bob Thomas in 1978, simply titled JOAN CRAWFORD; and JOAN CRAWFORD; THE
              LAST WORD by Fred Lawrence Guiles, 1995; and THE POWER OF GLAMOUR by
              Annette Tapert, 1998, which has some revealing insights into Joan's
              Lawton years.

              Joan Crawford describes her later meeting with Blanding in this way:
              The boy reponsible for my rescue was Don Blanding, a senior at
              Lawton High. He grew up to be a poet, and years later we met when he
              returned from the South Seas and the Orient and was doing celebrity
              interviews in Hollywood. When he arrived on the set of 'The Gorgeous
              Hussy' (1936), I said, "Hello, Don Blanding, do you know you once saved
              my life?"
              He looked blank.
              "I was Billie Cassin from..."
              "The little girl across the street!" and he wrote a poem that was
              published soon after.

              Fascinating, huh?
              Keith


              "beverly leinbach" <bevbac-@...> wrote:
              original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/aloha-donblanding/?start=
              179
              > Reply on Joan Crawford,
              >
              > I have a copy of two articles that I would like to share from.
              >
              > 1. Aloha/92...by Charles Lovell
              > "Another interesting story about Blanding's life concerns an
              > experience he had when a student in Lawton, A young neighbor girl
              named
              > Lucille Le Sueur had received a severe cut on her foot, and Blanding
              applied
              > a tourniquet to stop the bleeding. Many years later in Hollywood,
              the
              > "little girl from across the street" reintroduced herself to
              Blanding. By
              > that time she was well known as actress Joan Crawford, and she
              thanked
              > Blanding publicly for saving her life.
              >
              > 2. Dreams (feb.23,82)...by Terence Barrow
              > "Life in Lawton was colorful and rarely dull. One particular
              day
              > Blanding jumped into a pool to save a neighbor's daughter from
              > drowning. that girl became famous later as film star Joan Crawford
              and was
              > a lifetime friend of Blandings."
              >
              > What should we belive now?
              > Bev.
              >
              >
              > From: TikiRoom18@...
              > Reply-To: aloha-donblanding@egroups.com
              > To: aloha-donblanding@egroups.com
              > Subject: [aloha-donblanding] Blanding/Joan Crawford connection
              > Date: Sun, 30 Jan 2000 19:48:01 EST
              >
              >
              > Aloha Everybody
              >
              > I was reading a biography of Joan Crawford last night and I came
              across
              > what MAY be a roundabout connection to DB. Joan Crawford was born in
              either
              > 1904 or 1908 ,depending on who you choose to believe, in or near San
              > Antonio,
              > Texas. Around the time she was six her mother married a second
              husband and
              > moved to live with him in (ready?...) Lawton, Oklahoma. This new
              stepfather
              > of Joan's was the operator of the local vaudeville theatre and,
              according to
              > this book, each day after school Billie Cassin (Her name back
              then...)
              > "ran
              > to the theatre and stood in the wings, watching the comics and dancers
              > perform". Apparently she was quite the theatre bug, and saw her
              first
              > motion
              > pictures in Lawton as well.
              > At age eleven her family then moved on to Kansas City and her
              story
              > moves
              > on. The Internet Movie database (www.imdb.com) ,which is usually
              pretty
              > reliable, places her birth at March 23, 1904. This said, this would
              place
              > Joan in Lawton from 1910-1915. This begs the question... was Don in
              Lawton
              > then? What makes this question all the more interesting is that Don
              > dedicates
              > a poem in "Memory Room" to her, "The Little Girl Across The Street".
              (Don't
              > just glance over it, its a poem worth reading...)
              >
              > "She was just the little girl who lived across the street;
              > All legs and curls and great big eyes, and restless dancing feet;
              > As vivid as a hummingbird, as bright and swift and gay;
              > A child who played at make-believe throughout the livelong day
              > With tattered old lace curtains and a battered feather fan
              > She swept and preened, an "actress" with a grubby snub-nosed clan
              > Of neighbor kids for audience enchanted with the play
              > A prairie Bernhardt for awhile. And then she went away
              > We missed her on the little street, her laughter and her fun
              > Until the dull years blurred her name as years have ever done
              >
              > A great premiere in Hollywood. . . the lights, the crowds, the cars,
              > The frenzied noise of greeting to the famous movie stars,
              > The jewels, the lace, the ermine coats, the ballyhoo and cries,
              > The peacock women's promenade, the bright mascaraed eyes....
              > The swift excited whisper as the limousine draws near,
              > "Oh, look! It's Joan. It's Joan. It's Joan!" On every side I hear
              > The chatter, gossip, envy. sighs, conjecture, wonder,praise,
              > As memory races quickly back to early prairie days.
              > The little girl across the street. . . the funny child I knew
              > Who dared to dream her splendid dreams. . . and make her dreams come
              true.
              > `````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````
              ``
              > NEWSFLASH!!!! NEWSFLASH!!!!! NEWSFLASH!!!!!
              > Well, in the course of writing this post, I have answered my own
              > question.
              > I had thought about just deleting this post, but I figured somebody
              else
              > MIGHT be interested in reading my discovery... I can hope anyway....
              > I pulled out another Crawford Bio and looked in the index.. Lo
              and
              > Behold!
              > a direct reference to Don Blanding! This is in a book called "Joan
              > Crawford,
              > a biography by Bob Thomas" by, of course, Bob Thomas... on page 14 of
              the
              > paperback edition, this is stated:
              > "One day when Billie was six, she cut her foot. She had grown bored
              with her
              > piano lessons and decided to play on the front lawn. She leaped off
              the
              > porch
              > and landed on the jagged piece of a bottle. The glass ripped through
              her
              > tendon and artery, and the pain was so acute that she lost
              consciousness.
              > Don
              > Blanding, the boy across the street, was returning to his house for a
              > package
              > he had forgotten and discovered the small figure on the lawn. He
              carried her
              > into the house and called the doctor."
              >
              > On page 16 of this book we read an aftermath of sorts....
              >
              > " The Lawton years exerted a profound influence over Joan Crawford.
              She
              > never
              > escaped the guilt that she alone may have caused the family's
              downfall by
              > her
              > discovery in the cellar. (Stepfather was a gold smuggler, Joan came
              across
              > his loot in the cellar...). Fearful remembrances returned to her in
              later
              > years: An unexpected surge of wind recalled the terror of waiting
              > underground
              > for an Oklahoma cyclone to pass over. During a dance for "Our Blushing
              > Brides" she fell to the floor in excruciating pain, the same she had
              > experienced after she had leapt off the porch in Lawton......
              > Don Blanding, the Lawton boy who summoned a doctor when Billie
              Cassin
              > slashed her foot, became a popular versifier, and he wrote of his
              onetime
              > neighbor:
              >
              > She was just the little girl who lived across the street;
              > All legs and curls and great big eyes, and restless dancing feet;
              > As vivid as a hummingbird, as bright and swift and gay;
              > A child who played at make-believe"
              >
              > I guess that Don's association with celebrity came very early
              on.. This
              > episode with Joan Crawford came about when Don was about 16 years of
              age or
              > so. Anyone else have any insights into this? Do you know if they
              ever met
              > again? This poem sort of paints Don as an onlooker and not a
              participant in
              > Joan's later years...
              > I'd appreciate comments and further information on this
              interesting
              > episode in Don's life...
              > Am I the only person in the Western world NOT watching the
              > Super-bowl????
              >
              > Aloha
              > Larry
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ---------------------------------------------------------------------
              ---
              > To Post a message, send it to: aloha-donblanding@...
              > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
              > aloha-donblanding-unsubscribe@...
              >
            • TJMarkle@cs.com
              Re: Blanding/Crawford connection, it seems that most people who knew DB are gone now, and that the problem in researching him....lots of connections,
              Message 6 of 7 , Jan 30, 2000
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                Re: Blanding/Crawford connection, it seems that most people who knew DB are
                gone now, and that the problem in researching him....lots of connections,
                assumptions and interpretations, but isn't that like his poetry? Its just
                him, whatever spin you might put on it....
              • Gayle Harrington
                To Larry et al: I have also heard of the DB/Joan Crawford connection. One day I was driving home from work listening to Paul Harvey s The Rest of the Story
                Message 7 of 7 , Jan 30, 2000
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                  To Larry et al:

                  I have also heard of the DB/Joan Crawford connection. One day I was
                  driving home from work listening to Paul Harvey's "The Rest of the
                  Story" and the focus was on the story of a young girl who grew up to
                  become a famous Hollywood actress who lived across the street from
                  someone who would become a famous American poet. Of course he teased
                  at their names until the very end, as is his style with the program,
                  and then revealed that it was DB and Ms. Crawford. After hearing the
                  story I was determined to find a copy of Memory Room so that I could
                  read it again. (Happily I did.) He used the story of her cutting her
                  foot and him rescuing her, if that validates that version any. So
                  there is another vote for that one.

                  To answer the location question - I live near Redding, CA up near the
                  Oregon border. I would love to be able to wander through the libraries
                  in Carmel or Hawaii for that matter researching our favorite author
                  more. But my husband and I are happily busy raising 2 teenage
                  daughters at this time, so our time is totally consumed with sports
                  events, school dances, homework, etc. But I am content for now living
                  vicariously through everyone elses searches and ventures. So please
                  share with those of us who for now are "armchair vagabonds".

                  It has been brought up that DB did live in his Vagabond's House in
                  Carmel. Did he really get to build his dream house, and is this the
                  one he refers to in the story of the house burning? Yes/no - or what
                  happened to the house?

                  Gayle








                  tikiroom1-@... wrote:
                  original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/aloha-donblanding/?start=
                  175
                  > Aloha Everybody
                  >
                  > I was reading a biography of Joan Crawford last night and I came
                  across
                  > what MAY be a roundabout connection to DB. Joan Crawford was born in
                  either
                  > 1904 or 1908 ,depending on who you choose to believe, in or near San
                  Antonio,
                  > Texas. Around the time she was six her mother married a second
                  husband and
                  > moved to live with him in (ready?...) Lawton, Oklahoma. This new
                  stepfather
                  > of Joan's was the operator of the local vaudeville theatre and,
                  according to
                  > this book, each day after school Billie Cassin (Her name back
                  then...) "ran
                  > to the theatre and stood in the wings, watching the comics and
                  dancers
                  > perform". Apparently she was quite the theatre bug, and saw her
                  first motion
                  > pictures in Lawton as well.
                  > At age eleven her family then moved on to Kansas City and her
                  story moves
                  > on. The Internet Movie database (www.imdb.com) ,which is usually
                  pretty
                  > reliable, places her birth at March 23, 1904. This said, this would
                  place
                  > Joan in Lawton from 1910-1915. This begs the question... was Don in
                  Lawton
                  > then? What makes this question all the more interesting is that Don
                  dedicates
                  > a poem in "Memory Room" to her, "The Little Girl Across The Street".
                  (Don't
                  > just glance over it, its a poem wotth reading...)
                  >
                  > "She was just the little girl who lived across the street;
                  > All legs and curls and great big eyes, and restless dancing feet;
                  > As vivid as a hummingbird, as bright and swift and gay;
                  > A child who played at make-believe throughout the livelong day
                  > With tattered old lace curtains and a battered feather fan
                  > She swept and preened, an "actress" with a grubby snub-nosed clan
                  > Of neighbor kids for audience enchanted with the play
                  > A prairie Bernhardt for awhile. And then she went away
                  > We missed her on the little street, her laughter and her fun
                  > Untill the dull years blurred her name as years have ever done
                  >
                  > A great premiere in Hollywood. . . the lights, the crowds, the cars,
                  > The frenzied noise of greeting to the famous movie stars,
                  > The jewels, the lace, the ermine coats, the ballyhoo and cries,
                  > The peacock women's promenade, the bright mascaraed eyes....
                  > The swift excited whisper as the limousine draws near,
                  > "Oh, look! It's Joan. It's Joan. It's Joan!" On every side I hear
                  > The chatter, gossip, envy. sighs, conjecture, wonder,praise,
                  > As memory races quickly back to early prairie days.
                  > The little girl across the street. . . the funny child I knew
                  > Who dared to dream her splendid dreams. . . and make her dreams come
                  true.
                  > `````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````
                  ``
                  > NEWSFLASH!!!! NEWSFLASH!!!!! NEWSFLASH!!!!!
                  > Well, in the course of writing this post, I have answered my own
                  question.
                  > I had thought about just deleting this post, but I figured somebody
                  else
                  > MIGHT be interested in reading my discovery... I can hope anyway....
                  > I pulled out another Crawford Bio and looked in the index.. Lo and
                  Behold!
                  > a direct reference to Don Blanding! This is in a book called "Joan
                  Crawford,
                  > a biography by Bob Thomas" by, of course, Bob Thomas... on page 14 of
                  the
                  > paperback edition, this is stated:
                  > "One day when Billie was six, she cut her foot. She had grown bored
                  with her
                  > piano lessons and decided to play on the front lawn. She leaped off
                  the porch
                  > and landed on the jagged piece of a bottle. The glass ripped through
                  her
                  > tendon and artery, and the pain was so acute that she lost
                  consciousness. Don
                  > Blanding, the boy across the street, was returning to his house for a
                  package
                  > he had forgotten and discovered the small figure on the lawn. He
                  carried her
                  > into the house and called the doctor."
                  >
                  > On page 16 of this book we read an aftermath of sorts....
                  >
                  > " The Lawton years exerted a profound influence over Joan Crawford.
                  She never
                  > escaped the guilt that she alone may have caused the family's
                  downfall by her
                  > discovery in the cellar. (Stepfather was a gold smuggler, Joan came
                  across
                  > his loot in the cellar...). Fearful remembrances returned to her in
                  later
                  > years: An unexpected surge of wind recalled the terror of waiting
                  underground
                  > for an Oklahoma cyclone to pass over. During a dance for "Our
                  Blushing
                  > Brides" she fell to the floor in excruciating pain, the same she had
                  > experienced after she had leapt off the porch in Lawton......
                  > Don Blanding, the Lawton boy who summoned a doctor when Billie
                  Cassin
                  > slashed her foot, became a popular versifier, and he wrote of his
                  onetime
                  > neighbor:
                  >
                  > She was just the little girl who lived across the street;
                  > All legs and curls and great big eyes, and restless dancing feet;
                  > As vivid as a hummingbird, as bright and swift and gay;
                  > A child who played at make-believe"
                  >
                  > I guess that Don's association with celebrity came very early on..
                  This
                  > episode with Joan Crawford came about when Don was about 16 years of
                  age or
                  > so. Anyone else have any insights into this? Do you know if they
                  ever met
                  > again? This poem sort of paints Don as an onlooker and not a
                  participant in
                  > Joan's later years...
                  > I'd appreciate comments and further information on this
                  interesting
                  > episode in Don's life...
                  > Am I the only person in the Western world NOT watching the
                  Super-bowl????
                  >
                  > Aloha
                  > Larry
                  >
                  >
                  >
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