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Feb 1, 1861 KGC and Texas Secession

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  • CCC
    *** ALL TREASURE TALES USA ***Feb 1, 1861 KGC and Texas Secession http://knights-of-the-golden-circle.blogspot.com/2011/02/sam-houston-we-have-problem.html
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 1, 2011
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      *** ALL TREASURE TALES USA ***
      Feb 1, 1861 KGC and Texas Secession
       
       
      This article is on the Texas Secession Convention of Feb. 1, 1861.
       
      Excerps:
      "Texas became embroiled in the national politics of slavery from the beginning of its statehood process. John C. Calhoun once planned to divide Texas into six states to magnify the power of slave states in the Senate; his plan failed. The Democratic Party, which controlled most of the state’s political scene, pushed Texas further into the Deep South camp, and skepticism against the Republicans and Washington grew intense. The Knights of the Golden Circle, a secret society established by Kentucky plantation owners to promote slavery in the West, spread quickly through the state, establishing “castles,” or chapters, that encouraged talk of secession as the 1850s drew to a close and fear of a Republican win in 1860 rose."
       
      "It finally came on Feb. 1, 1861; as Houston sat in his office, upstairs the Secession Convention, led by Supreme Court Justice O.M. Roberts, demonstrated the full power of cotton and slavery interests. Each delegate had moved to Texas from a slaveholding state. Most were older and wealthier. Many were lawyers, and 70 percent were slave owners. A large number were members of the Knights of the Golden Circle. "
    • CCC
      *** ALL TREASURE TALES USA ***http://thesouthsdefender.blogspot.com/2011/02/150-years-ago-texas-gone-out.html Former Texas Ranger Ben McCulloch assembled a
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 1, 2011
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        *** ALL TREASURE TALES USA ***
         
        " Former Texas Ranger Ben McCulloch assembled a force of Texans, many who were members of the Knights of the Golden Circle, in San Antonio and took Twiggs (Gen. David E. Twiggs, commander of U.S. troops in the state) into custody on February 16, 1861. Twiggs, a native of Georgia with southern sympathies, agreed to surrender his troops and federal property to the state. The U.S. soldiers were allowed to retain their sidearms and exit the state with honor.
           Twiggs soon was dismissed from the U.S. Army and became a Confederate general in command of the troops forming at New Orleans. Twiggs died July  15, 1862 at age 72. McCulloch went on to become a Confederate general and was killed in action at the Battle of Elk Horn Tavern, Arkansas on March 7, 1862. Sam Houston died in 1863,"
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: CCC
        Sent: Tuesday, February 01, 2011 3:46 PM
        Subject: Feb 1, 1861 KGC and Texas Secession

        Feb 1, 1861 KGC and Texas Secession
         
         
        This article is on the Texas Secession Convention of Feb. 1, 1861.
         
        Excerps:
        "Texas became embroiled in the national politics of slavery from the beginning of its statehood process. John C. Calhoun once planned to divide Texas into six states to magnify the power of slave states in the Senate; his plan failed. The Democratic Party, which controlled most of the state’s political scene, pushed Texas further into the Deep South camp, and skepticism against the Republicans and Washington grew intense. The Knights of the Golden Circle, a secret society established by Kentucky plantation owners to promote slavery in the West, spread quickly through the state, establishing “castles,” or chapters, that encouraged talk of secession as the 1850s drew to a close and fear of a Republican win in 1860 rose."
         
        "It finally came on Feb. 1, 1861; as Houston sat in his office, upstairs the Secession Convention, led by Supreme Court Justice O.M. Roberts, demonstrated the full power of cotton and slavery interests. Each delegate had moved to Texas from a slaveholding state. Most were older and wealthier. Many were lawyers, and 70 percent were slave owners. A large number were members of the Knights of the Golden Circle. "
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