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Re: [allthingshistory] A little of the Odyssey (that horrible book!)

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  • Elena Vaccaro
    Sorry Josh, it has been years since I have read either one, but the memorization is quite possible. Most pre-literate societies practiced or endorsed some sort
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 1, 2011
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      Sorry Josh, it has been years since I have read either one, but the memorization is quite possible. Most pre-literate societies practiced or endorsed some sort of bard which is the Celtic word for storyteller and keeper of chronicles & genealogies.

      I have not studied the ancient Greeks as much as I have the ancient Celts whose tales were only written down after the majority had converted to Christianity or by Christian scribes. The tradition was for a Druid, be they a Bard, a Priest (also known as a Druid to cause further confusion), or a Sacrificer, whose name is self descriptive.

      From what I have been able to put together, both the Ancient Greeks and Celts came out of the same general area so there probably was some overlap in methodology in their belief systems prior to the natural evolution of the culture.

      Not sure if this helped or not. You will do well in your class and I just might have to pick the book up and read it. (It is on my hard drive so there is no excuse other than other interests.)

      Elena
      >^..^<
       

      --- On Tue, 8/30/11, Joshua Schmidt <jade4stone@...> wrote:

      From: Joshua Schmidt <jade4stone@...>
      Subject: [allthingshistory] A little of the Odyssey (that horrible book!)
      To: allthingshistory@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Tuesday, August 30, 2011, 10:59 PM

      Dear Group,

      I've read the Iliad before (a lot shorter), but the Odyssey, upon first reading, has a much more complex structure!  My college professors claim that bards had the capability of memorizing the entirety of these passages, divided into books; it is still debated whether Homer was original in his oral epic or if he ever existed.  Cadence, metaphor, simile, rhythm, and rhyme (at least in Greek) acted well as pneumonic devices.  In your opinion, which books of the Odyssey were easiest to recognize.  I think books IX through XII were the most fluid and the most narrative, lending to its methodical and pedagogical tendency of Odysseus's pains and adventures.  Remember, your well-acknowledged insight will help me further in earning a higher grade in my Honors Western Civilization course.

      Sincerely,

      Joshua Schmidt

      P.S.  Hopefully, this will ease your minds from Dale's bantering on trivial typos! (Don't you think about it, Dale!  I'm an innocent youth :P)

      Sent from my iPhone

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