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PaleoIndian finds

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  • robert-blau@webtv.net
    Scientists unearth oldest site in Umpqua The News-Review [USA], November 24, 2009 The summer fire that charred the area along the North Umpqua Highway east of
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 30, 2009
      Scientists unearth oldest site in Umpqua The News-Review [USA], November
      24, 2009

      The summer fire that charred the area along the North Umpqua Highway
      east of Roseburg was just one of many events that have branded the
      Umpqua National Forest for millennia. Last week, in near-freezing
      weather, volunteers and scientists sifted rubble and layers of forest
      floor in search of artifacts that predate the Mount Mazama volcano blast
      â€" which occurred 6,600 years ago and later formed Crater Lake --
      and provide a record of the oldest evidence of humans in the Umpqua
      Basin. The firmest date linked to evidence found at the archaeological
      site near Williams Creek is 7,680 years ago, said Brian O'Neill, senior
      staff archaeologist with the University of Oregon's Museum of Natural
      and Cultural History and the Oregon State Museum of Anthropology.
      However, the depth and amount of obsidian arrowheads and other tools dug
      up lead O'Neill and others to believe the site may be older than 10,000
      years.

      http://snipr.com/tgqle

      10,000-year-old weapon found at site of new Ontario arena
      Windsor Star [Canada], November 27, 2009

      Archaeologists in Windsor, Ont., have discovered a 10,000-year-old stone
      weapon created by the first humans who lived in the province. Newmarket
      archaeologist Kim Slocki said she found a single "projectile point"
      in her pre-construction survey of the site of a
      new arena. "It's at least 10,000 years old," Slocki said. She said
      the artifact comes from Paleoindian hunters often called the "first
      people of Ontario." Other archeologists familiar with the area said
      her find is at least 7,000 years older than anything previously
      discovered there. Neal Ferris, former regional archaeologist and
      heritage planner for the province, said Slock's find is the first in the
      Windsor-area going back to the era of Paleoindians.

      http://snipr.com/tgp8o

      Ancient camp unearthed along Rideau River
      The Ottawa Citizen, November 27, 2009

      A team of archeologists working for the City of Ottawa has uncovered the
      oldest aboriginal camp yet found within the city limits, including stone
      tools and pieces of artfully decorated pottery dating from 300 BC to 700
      AD. Archeologists believe that the camp on the Rideau River was used
      periodically by Algonquin people because it was a good site for fishing,
      hunting and perhaps for gathering berries. The dig started in early
      November because a nearby construction project will disturb the site for
      about a year. The National Capital Commission and scientists working on
      the dig do not want the location disclosed because souvenir hunters
      might dig up the riverbank looking for artifacts.

      http://snipr.com/tgpkw
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