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Re: [allthingshistory] Trivia 27 Feb

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  • Jeffrey Frantz
    I m at work and nowhere near my references. Would you be asking about the state of Franklin? IIRC, it was originally part of what s now Tennessee. Jeff
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 1, 2007
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      I'm at work and nowhere near my references.  Would you be asking about the state of Franklin?  IIRC, it was originally part of what's now Tennessee.
      Jeff
       

      Tristan <nitsirtthecommie@...> wrote:
      What was the fourteenth state? What was it before it became a state?



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    • nitsirt
      Unfortunetly, no. The 14th state was Vermont, which prior to joinging the US was the independent Republic of the Green Mountains. Thanks for mentioning
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 1, 2007
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        Unfortunetly, no. The 14th state was Vermont, which prior to joinging the US was the independent Republic of the Green Mountains. Thanks for mentioning Franklin though, I had never heard of it, so I will include its Wikipedia article as well.
         
        Vermont, from Wiki:
        In 1763, the Treaty of Paris ended the French and Indian War, giving the area to the British. Parts of the region were controlled by the Province of New York and the Province of New Hampshire, with overlap due to controversy surrounding the New Hampshire Grants, and George III's decision to make that part of New York.

        [edit] Founding

        Ethan Allen and his "Green Mountain Boys" became the militia, and fought against the British, then later against New York and New Hampshire, and on January 15, 1777 the rebels declared the region independent as the Republic of New Connecticut, although it was sometimes known colloquially as the Republic of the Green Mountains. On July 8 of that same year, the name of the fledgling nation was officially changed to Vermont (from the French for Green Mountains, les Verts Monts).

        [edit] Frame of government

        Thomas Chittenden, first governor of the Vermont Republic, he later served as governor of the U.S. state of Vermont.
        Thomas Chittenden, first governor of the Vermont Republic, he later served as governor of the U.S. state of Vermont.
        The Constitution of the Vermont Republic was drafted and ratified in 1777, and was the first written national constitution in North America. It was also the first constitution in the New World to outlaw slavery and allow all adult males to vote, regardless of property ownership. During the Vermont Republic, sometimes referred to as "the first republic", a veiled suggestion of future independence, the government issued its own coinage and currency, and operated a postal service. The general Assembly and Governor's Council adopted the infantry banner of the Green Mountain Boys as the national flag of the nascent republic. The Governor of the Republic, Thomas Chittenden, with consent of his council and the unicameral General Assembly, appointed ambassadors to France, the Netherlands, and the American government seated in Philadelphia. The Vermont Republic is sometimes referred to as a "reluctant republic" because many early citizens favored political union with the United States. The independent status held until 1791, when Vermont joined the Union, in part as a non-slaveholding counterweight to the slaveholding Kentucky. The admission of Vermont was supported by the North, the smaller states, and states concerned about the impact of the sea-to-sea grants held by other states. Thomas Chittenden served as head of state for Vermont for most of this period, and became its first governor as a member-state in the United States.
         
        Franklin, from Wiki:
        As the federal Congress was heavily in debt at the close of the Revolutionary War, the state of North Carolina voted, in April 1784, "to give Congress the 29,000,000 acres lying between the Allegheny Mountains and the Mississippi river."[1] This did not please the Watauga settlers who had gained an earnest foothold on the Cumberland River at Fort Nashborough. They feared Congress might in desperation sell the territory to a foreign power such as France or Spain. A few months later the legislature of North Carolina withdrew its gift, and again took charge of its western land because it feared the land would not be used to pay the debts of Congress. These North Carolina law makers also "ordered judges to hold court in the western counties, arranged to enroll a brigade of soldiers, and appointed John Sevier to command it."[2]

        [edit] Secessionist movement

        The spirit of the American Revolution was still very much a part of the frontier world view, and increasing dissatisfaction with the government of North Carolina by citizens in the territory west of the Alleghenies led to calls for the establishment of a separate state. On August 23, 1784, delegates from the North Carolina counties of Washington, Sullivan, Spencer (now Hawkins) and Greene — all counties in present-day Tennessee — convened in the town of Jonesborough and declared the lands independent of North Carolina.
        On May 16, 1785, a delegation from these counties submitted a petition for statehood to the United States Congress. Seven states voted to admit the tiny state under the proposed name Frankland. Though a majority, the number of states voting in favor fell short of the two-thirds majority required to admit a territory to statehood under the Articles of Confederation. In an attempt to curry favor for their cause, leaders changed the name to "Franklin" after Benjamin Franklin, and even initiated a correspondence with the patriot to sway him to support them. Franklin politely refused.
        Locally, a constitution that disallowed lawyers, doctors and preachers from election to the legislature was rejected by plebiscite. Thereafter, a constitution modeled on that of North Carolina was adopted with few changes, and the state was called Franklin.
        A temporary government was assembled at Greeneville. After a swift election, John Sevier became governor and David Campbell judge of the Superior Court. Greeneville was declared the permanent capital. The first legislature met in December 1785; Landon Carter was the Speaker of the Senate, and Thomas Talbot its clerk. William Gage was Speaker of the House, and Thomas Chapman served as House Clerk.
        The legislature made treaties with the Native American tribes in the area, opened courts, incorporated and annexed five new counties (see map above), and fixed taxes and officers' salaries. Barter was the economic system both de facto and de jure, and anything in common use among the people was allowed to be paid to settle debts, including foreign money, corn, tobacco, whiskey, and skins (Sevier himself was paid in deer hides). Citizens were granted a two-year reprieve on paying taxes, but this lack of currency and economic infrastructure slowed development and created confusion.
        The year 1786 was the beginning of the end of the small state. Franklin was placed in a precarious position by not being admitted to the United States. Because it shunned North Carolina's claims of sovereignty over it, Franklin did not have the benefit of the either the national army or the North Carolina militia. North Carolina offered to waive all back taxes if Franklin would reunite with its government. When this offer was not accepted, North Carolina moved in troops under the leadership of Col. John Tipton and established its own government in the region. The two rival administrations competed side by side for several months. Loyalties were divided among local residents. The only "battle" between Sevier's supporters and those of Tipton was fought in 1788 at Col. Tipton's farm which has been preserved as the Tipton-Haynes Historic Site in Johnson City, Tennessee.
        Sevier, becoming desperate over the Franklin government's inability to function due to economic problems, sought a loan from the Spanish government. The North Carolina government was absolutely opposed to any foreign nation gaining a foothold in Franklin and ordered its officials to arrest Sevier. Sevier's supporters freed him from a local jail but Sevier decided to turn himself in anyway in February 1788. North Carolina was lenient and the only punishment given Sevier was to require him to swear an oath of allegiance to North Carolina.
        In late March 1788, the Cherokee, Chickamauga and Chickasaw nations collectively began to attack white American settlements in Franklin with abandon. These Indian attacks led the short-lived state to settle its differences with North Carolina very quickly, so their militia might aid in driving out the Native American attackers.

        [edit] Transition to Tennessee

        As of 1790, the government of the State of Franklin had collapsed entirely and the territory was firmly back under the control of North Carolina. Sevier was elected to the North Carolina legislature to represent the region. Soon thereafter, the state once again ceded the area that would soon become Tennessee to the national government to form the Southwest Territory. John Sevier became Tennessee's first governor, and John Tipton signed the Tennessee Constitution as the representative from Washington County.

        Jeffrey Frantz <frantz90@...> wrote:
        I'm at work and nowhere near my references.  Would you be asking about the state of Franklin?  IIRC, it was originally part of what's now Tennessee.
        Jeff
         

        Tristan <nitsirtthecommie@ yahoo.com> wrote:
        What was the fourteenth state? What was it before it became a state?



        Access over 1 million songs - Yahoo! Music Unlimited.



        "Next time you think no one cares, go to Gethsemane."
      • Kim Noyes
        Was that similar to the idea of the State of Jefferson? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State_of_Jefferson and http://www.jeffersonstate.com/ ... -- Check out my
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 1, 2007
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          Was that similar to the idea of the State of Jefferson?
          On 3/1/07, Jeffrey Frantz <frantz90@...> wrote:

          I'm at work and nowhere near my references.  Would you be asking about the state of Franklin?  IIRC, it was originally part of what's now Tennessee.
           
          Jeff
           

          Tristan <nitsirtthecommie@yahoo.com> wrote:
          What was the fourteenth state? What was it before it became a state?

           


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